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Jiang Qing

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NEWS
June 5, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jiang Qing, widow of Mao Tse-tung and fiery leader of radical leftists during China's chaotic Cultural Revolution, committed suicide at home last month, the government announced Tuesday. Jiang, 77, nearly achieved supreme power in 1976 while Chairman Mao lay on his deathbed. But she was arrested by political rivals just one month after his death and never regained real freedom.
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OPINION
March 8, 1998 | Ross Terrill, Ross Terrill, a visiting professor at the University of Texas, is the author of the biographies "Mao" and "Madame Mao."
As sex and politics danced a pas de deux in the Beijing of Mao Tse-tung, the self-indulgence of the top leader spanned the personal and the political, and private excesses had consequences for bystanders and public policy. Despite enormous differences in the Chinese and U.S. political systems, Mao's conduct may provide some insights into President Bill Clinton's alleged problem. Jiang Qing, like Hillary Rodham Clinton, had a career (stage and screen) that she gave up for her husband's sake.
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OPINION
June 9, 1991 | LIU BINYAN, Liu Binyan, one of China's leading dissidents, is living in exile in Princeton, N.J. This article was translated from the Chinese by Perry Link
One of the most fervent hopes of Chinese people today, at least in the cities, is that the old-guard Communist leadership will die off quickly. Young people in Beijing comment sarcastically that, "I've been in a bad mood for a long time, and just realized that it's because the radio hasn't been carrying much funeral music recently." But the death of Mao Tse-tung's widow, Jiang Qing, is certainly not going to get the Chinese people excited.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1994 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Calendar
If politics makes strange bedfellows, theater can make stranger ones still. Soft-spoken writer Henry Ong sits amid the tan Southwestern decor of his Silver Lake home. He is as subtle as the color scheme in this hillside sanctuary, a man with much regard for fact but little for sensationalism. Jiang Qing, the woman whose life Ong portrays in his one-woman play "Madame Mao's Memories," is another matter entirely.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1994 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Calendar
If politics makes strange bedfellows, theater can make stranger ones still. Soft-spoken writer Henry Ong sits amid the tan Southwestern decor of his Silver Lake home. He is as subtle as the color scheme in this hillside sanctuary, a man with much regard for fact but little for sensationalism. Jiang Qing, the woman whose life Ong portrays in his one-woman play "Madame Mao's Memories," is another matter entirely.
OPINION
March 8, 1998 | Ross Terrill, Ross Terrill, a visiting professor at the University of Texas, is the author of the biographies "Mao" and "Madame Mao."
As sex and politics danced a pas de deux in the Beijing of Mao Tse-tung, the self-indulgence of the top leader spanned the personal and the political, and private excesses had consequences for bystanders and public policy. Despite enormous differences in the Chinese and U.S. political systems, Mao's conduct may provide some insights into President Bill Clinton's alleged problem. Jiang Qing, like Hillary Rodham Clinton, had a career (stage and screen) that she gave up for her husband's sake.
NEWS
December 29, 1988
Chinese authorities denied a report in a Chinese newspaper, the China Daily, that Jiang Qing, widow of Mao Tse-tung, is critically ill. "Jiang Qing is suffering from ordinary diseases of old age. She is not in danger," a Ministry of Justice spokesman said. The spokesman also denied a Chinese publication's report earlier that Jiang, 74, was no longer in custody and was being treated in a Beijing hospital for throat cancer.
NEWS
June 10, 1991 | Reuters
Jiang Qing was a Hitler, and the suicide last month of the widow of the late Communist Party Chairman Mao Tse-tung was well-deserved, said an official newspaper commentary on her death. "The witch has committed suicide," said Shanghai's Liberation Daily. "But it goes without saying that death cannot expiate her crimes." The death May 14 of the former Shanghai actress who ruthlessly wielded power to push the ultra-leftist cause was announced officially last week.
NEWS
January 12, 1987 | United Press International
Jiang Qing, Mao Tse-tung's widow and leader of the Gang of Four that presided over purges during the 1966-76 Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, is suffering from cancer and near death, according to a newspaper that reached Peking today. "Jiang Qing, serving a jail term on charges she took part in a counterrevolutionary organization, is undergoing treatment for cancer of the throat in a high-grade individual ward in a Peking hospital," said a report in the Dec.
NEWS
June 4, 1991 | United Press International
Jiang Qing, widow of China's Chairman Mao Tse-tung and ringleader of the infamous Gang of Four, reportedly committed suicide last month in the suburban Beijing villa where she had been under house arrest for 10 years, Time magazine reported Monday. The magazine said that Jiang, 77, a well-known actress before marrying Mao in the late 1930s, was known to have throat cancer and may have wished to shorten her suffering.
NEWS
June 10, 1991 | Reuters
Jiang Qing was a Hitler, and the suicide last month of the widow of the late Communist Party Chairman Mao Tse-tung was well-deserved, said an official newspaper commentary on her death. "The witch has committed suicide," said Shanghai's Liberation Daily. "But it goes without saying that death cannot expiate her crimes." The death May 14 of the former Shanghai actress who ruthlessly wielded power to push the ultra-leftist cause was announced officially last week.
OPINION
June 9, 1991 | LIU BINYAN, Liu Binyan, one of China's leading dissidents, is living in exile in Princeton, N.J. This article was translated from the Chinese by Perry Link
One of the most fervent hopes of Chinese people today, at least in the cities, is that the old-guard Communist leadership will die off quickly. Young people in Beijing comment sarcastically that, "I've been in a bad mood for a long time, and just realized that it's because the radio hasn't been carrying much funeral music recently." But the death of Mao Tse-tung's widow, Jiang Qing, is certainly not going to get the Chinese people excited.
NEWS
June 5, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jiang Qing, widow of Mao Tse-tung and fiery leader of radical leftists during China's chaotic Cultural Revolution, committed suicide at home last month, the government announced Tuesday. Jiang, 77, nearly achieved supreme power in 1976 while Chairman Mao lay on his deathbed. But she was arrested by political rivals just one month after his death and never regained real freedom.
NEWS
June 4, 1991 | United Press International
Jiang Qing, widow of China's Chairman Mao Tse-tung and ringleader of the infamous Gang of Four, reportedly committed suicide last month in the suburban Beijing villa where she had been under house arrest for 10 years, Time magazine reported Monday. The magazine said that Jiang, 77, a well-known actress before marrying Mao in the late 1930s, was known to have throat cancer and may have wished to shorten her suffering.
NEWS
December 29, 1988
Chinese authorities denied a report in a Chinese newspaper, the China Daily, that Jiang Qing, widow of Mao Tse-tung, is critically ill. "Jiang Qing is suffering from ordinary diseases of old age. She is not in danger," a Ministry of Justice spokesman said. The spokesman also denied a Chinese publication's report earlier that Jiang, 74, was no longer in custody and was being treated in a Beijing hospital for throat cancer.
NEWS
December 20, 1988
Mao Tse-tung's widow, Jiang Qing, has been freed from prison and is being treated for throat cancer at a Beijing hospital, an official magazine reported. Chinese Youth, a monthly publication of the Communist Youth League, made the disclosure in its latest edition in reply to a letter. It gave no further details. Jiang, 74, a former Shanghai actress, and three radical allies, known as the Gang of Four, were arrested soon after the death of Mao in 1976.
NEWS
December 20, 1988
Mao Tse-tung's widow, Jiang Qing, has been freed from prison and is being treated for throat cancer at a Beijing hospital, an official magazine reported. Chinese Youth, a monthly publication of the Communist Youth League, made the disclosure in its latest edition in reply to a letter. It gave no further details. Jiang, 74, a former Shanghai actress, and three radical allies, known as the Gang of Four, were arrested soon after the death of Mao in 1976.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Mao Tse-tung's widow, Jiang Qing, has throat cancer but is refusing an operation because it would leave her voiceless, a pro-Beijing newspaper in Hong Kong reported Saturday. Jiang, 74, was last seen in public Jan. 25, 1981, when a show trial ended and she was removed screaming from a Beijing courtroom, shouting revolutionary slogans and cursing her judges and China's current leaders as "fascists, renegades, traitors."
NEWS
December 29, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Mao Tse-tung's widow is still in prison, a Justice Ministry spokesman said Monday, denying foreign reports Jiang Qing had been freed. "She is still in prison. She is still serving her (life) sentence," the spokesman said. The Hong Kong-based Far Eastern Economic Review reported last week, without citing sources, that Jiang had been released and was living in a Beijing villa in poor health. Rumors of a release have been circulating here.
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