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Jibjab Com

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OPINION
January 16, 2005
Gregg and Evan Spiridellis of Santa Monica, a.k.a. the JibJab brothers, disrupted many office environments last summer when their election parody "This Land!" sang and danced across computer screens. For reasons that made sense at the time, Opinion asked them to apply their perspective to the section's cover in advance of President Bush's inauguration. www.jibjab.com
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2007 | Claire Zulkey, Special to The Times
Fox's "So You Think You Can Dance," which just wrapped up its third installment, might be the best competition show on prime-time television. On what other program are viewers treated to a pool of talented contestants working as hard as they can on a beautiful art form, knowledgeable and caring judges, and noteworthy performances each and every week? This season's winner, crowned at the end of Thursday night's results show, Sabra Johnson typified everything that is wonderful about the show.
NEWS
July 22, 2004 | Gayle Pollard-Terry, Times Staff Writer
Ever since the online launch of their wildly popular animated political parody at JibJab.com -- one that's equally insulting to President Bush and his presumptive Democratic challenger, Sen. John F. Kerry -- life hasn't been the same for the Spiridellis brothers, the site's creators. Set to the tune of Woody Guthrie's "This Land Is Your Land," the two-minute cartoon lambastes "the right-wing nut job" (Bush) and the "liberal wiener" (Kerry) with amusing animation and slightly off-color lyrics.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2005 | Steve Johnson, Chicago Tribune
In lampooning a sitting president chosen, apparently, by half of the Americans who cared enough to vote, the cartoonists at JibJab take on a challenging task. Making fun of the year George W. Bush had in "2-0-5" -- the new JibJab video's title, derived from the lead character's name for the current 12 months -- isn't difficult. Enough went wrong for the president this year to fuel an entire Capitol Steps revue, not just a two-minute Internet video. But in "This Land" and "Good to Be in D.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2000 | ERIKA MILVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Letterman, Leno and Maher are shaking behind their coffee mugs. The era of no-brainer political humor is coming to a close. For eight years now, President Clinton's shenanigans ensured that comedy fodder was easy as pie. Or Big Macs. Or KFC and Pizza Hut. Stand-ups had their pick of G-rated fast-food one-liners or the saucier stuff. But just when it seemed we might have nothing to gossip about except, gasp, the issues, technology comes to our aid, once again.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2004 | Ashley Powers and Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writers
It's not unusual for people to look for political laughs during a combative presidential campaign. What is unusual about the 2004 race is where they looked -- the Internet. From the commander in chief cartwheeling with a pink bow on his head to Sens. John F. Kerry and John Edwards exchanging teen-lust glances, satiric images of both candidates on the Internet clogged millions of e-mail inboxes this campaign season.
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