Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJigme Singye Wangchuck
IN THE NEWS

Jigme Singye Wangchuck

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When this nation's monarch next holds court, he may be wearing sneakers. Husband to four beautiful women (all sisters), a knowledgeable fan of the National Basketball Assn. and occupant of a hillside log cabin, Jigme Singye Wangchuck, head of the last surviving Buddhist kingdom in the Himalayas, is no ordinary absolute ruler.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 25, 2007 | Barbara Crossette, BARBARA CROSSETTE, a former New York Times correspondent in Asia, is the author of "So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas."
IT OFTEN COMES as a bewildering surprise to Americans that not all people think democracy is the best system of government, even when they value its ideals. Often, a fear of insecurity or a preference for well-being over free-for-all politics is at the heart of this.
Advertisement
OPINION
April 25, 2007 | Barbara Crossette, BARBARA CROSSETTE, a former New York Times correspondent in Asia, is the author of "So Close to Heaven: The Vanishing Buddhist Kingdoms of the Himalayas."
IT OFTEN COMES as a bewildering surprise to Americans that not all people think democracy is the best system of government, even when they value its ideals. Often, a fear of insecurity or a preference for well-being over free-for-all politics is at the heart of this.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Jigme Singye Wangchuck, leader of the Himalayas' last Buddhist monarchy, boasts four wives, a passion for basketball and a gilded throne. His latest infatuation is democracy. In a series of dramatic moves, the king has charted a course aimed at preparing this fabled land of myth and magic for the tedious realities of self-rule.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
King Jigme Singye Wangchuck, leader of the Himalayas' last Buddhist monarchy, boasts four wives, a passion for basketball and a gilded throne. His latest infatuation is democracy. In a series of dramatic moves, the king has charted a course aimed at preparing this fabled land of myth and magic for the tedious realities of self-rule.
WORLD
March 28, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Bhutan's king is circulating a draft constitution aimed at establishing a democracy that would end almost 100 years of monarchical rule, the editor of a state-run newspaper said. The constitution would provide for two houses of parliament -- a 75-member National Assembly and a 25-member National Council. King Jigme Singye Wangchuck would become head of state, but parliament could impeach him by a two-thirds vote, said Kinley Dorji, editor of the Kuensel newspaper.
WORLD
December 17, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
King Jigme Singye Wangchuck abdicated and announced that he would hand power to his Western-educated son, who is expected to usher in a parliamentary democracy for the isolated Himalayan kingdom. The king, who assumed the throne in 1972 when he was 17, said a year ago that he would abdicate in favor of 26-year-old Crown Prince Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck in 2008 as part of the Buddhist country's transformation from an absolute monarchy.
NEWS
April 29, 1998 | Associated Press
Bhutan's most revered monastery will be rebuilt after sacred relics and icons are removed from the burned ruins on the side of a cliff, officials said Tuesday. King Jigme Singye Wangchuck ordered the reconstruction of the Taktsang Monastery, where an April 19 fire consumed much of the wood and stone structure built in the 17th century. The original site dates back 1,200 years.
NEWS
October 31, 1988 | United Press International
King Jigme Singye Wangchuck of Bhutan today publicly formalized a marriage to four sisters he wed in private nine years ago and named the eldest of his eight children heir to the throne of the tiny Himalayan nation, a Bhutan Embassy official said. The official said the traditional hourlong Buddhist ceremony was performed as scheduled at an ancient monastery in Punakha, the former capital of the isolated nation of 1.3 million people located between India and Tibet in the eastern Himalayas.
WORLD
March 25, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A royalist political party swept the first parliamentary elections ever held in this secluded Himalayan kingdom, the election commissioner said Monday. The Bhutan Peace and Prosperity Party took 44 of the 47 seats in the new parliament, Election Commissioner Kunzang Wangdi said. The People's Democratic Party won the remaining three seats. Both parties say they will follow the government's latest five-year plan, which they call "his majesty's vision."
NEWS
October 15, 1995 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When this nation's monarch next holds court, he may be wearing sneakers. Husband to four beautiful women (all sisters), a knowledgeable fan of the National Basketball Assn. and occupant of a hillside log cabin, Jigme Singye Wangchuck, head of the last surviving Buddhist kingdom in the Himalayas, is no ordinary absolute ruler.
NEWS
November 17, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Two kings, three presidents and two prime ministers representing a billion people in South Asia met here Sunday to discuss ways of raising living standards in the region and other issues. The leaders of Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, which form the fledgling South Asian Assn. for Regional Cooperation (SAARC), met at the ornate Parliament building in Bangalore under tight security.
WORLD
December 21, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
At least 130 rebels have been killed and 500 have surrendered as Bhutan presses its campaign to flush out Indian guerrillas holed up in the tiny Himalayan kingdom, officials said Saturday. King Jigme Singye Wangchuck and his son are personally "leading the troops" on the offensive, which began last week, a Bhutanese official said. "The king and his son are leading the troops in flushing Indian rebels out of Bhutanese soil," said the government official, who did not want to be identified.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|