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Jill Barad

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NEWS
February 4, 2000 | NONA YATES
Jill Barad resigned Thursday as chairwoman and chief executive of Mattel Inc. She started at Mattel in 1981 as a product manager, held various positions and was named chairwoman and CEO in 1997. * Born: May 23, 1951, New York * Residence: Los Angeles * Education: Bachelor of Arts, English and psychology, Queens College, New York, 1973 * Career highlights: Mattel's Barbie doll sales soared under her leadership as marketing director for the brand.
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BUSINESS
December 6, 2002 | Abigail Goldman, Times Staff Writer
Mattel Inc. on Thursday closed the books on what has been called one of the worst acquisitions in corporate history, announcing a $122-million settlement with shareholders over its ill-fated purchase of Learning Co. The El Segundo-based toy maker said it would take a $25.5-million pretax charge in the fourth quarter to cover legal fees and an uninsured portion of the settlement, with the balance to be paid by insurers. Mattel's settlement ranks No.
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MAGAZINE
December 4, 1988
FIVE YEARS AGO, Jill Elikann Barad was in the delivery room, about to give birth to her second child, when she remembered a detail she had to tell one of her product managers at Mattel Toys for an upcoming presentation. She asked for a telephone and called her office. Then, after making a second business call, she promptly went into surgery, where her son Justin was delivered by Caesarean section.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Mattel Inc. revised its policy on severance awards after shareholder criticism of a $50-million send-off that the toy company gave to former top officer Jill Barad. Under the new rules, Mattel in most cases won't grant a departing executive severance benefits that "significantly exceed" the requirements of the officer's employment contract, according to a proxy statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1990 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These are the times that try toy makers' souls. Unless, that is, you're sitting on one of the hottest toys to hit--and quickly disappear from--retailer shelves. Jill Elikann Barad of Mattel has found herself in that position this Christmas. And last Christmas. And the one before that. Barad, who two months ago was named president of Mattel's domestic operations--a title she shares with former Tonka executive David M. Mauer--is the brains behind Mattel's latest hit, the Magic Nursery doll.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2000
I was appalled by the details of the deal that Mattel cut with Jill Barad ["Ex-CEO Given $40-Million Exit Deal by Mattel," April 29]. It appears the "good old boy" network is alive and well, and she will surely sit on the boards of the current directors' companies (scratch your back). Only in America do we reward the people at the top for poor performance. We make them rich on the way in and richer on the way out. Every time some grunt gets a 10-cent-an-hour raise, the Fed wants to yell inflation and raise interest rates, but it's OK to give away the store to the top executives of major corporations.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2000 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN
Who will make big news in the business world this year? Who will emerge from relative obscurity to become a major player? To start the new year, Times business reporters selected people from their beats who they believe will be among those to watch in 2000--in Southern California, across the country and around the world. Some are well known, having made big news in previous years. Others are not exactly household names but nevertheless are likely to make a major impact in their fields.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Mattel Inc. revised its policy on severance awards after shareholder criticism of a $50-million send-off that the toy company gave to former top officer Jill Barad. Under the new rules, Mattel in most cases won't grant a departing executive severance benefits that "significantly exceed" the requirements of the officer's employment contract, according to a proxy statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five candidates for Los Angeles' 5th City Council District called Friday for Police Chief Bernard C. Parks to be replaced as part of an effort to restore the credibility of the department. Other candidates, including former state Sen. Tom Hayden and former federal prosecutor Jack Weiss, also criticized the chief but did not call for his replacement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 11 candidates competing for the 5th District seat on the Los Angeles City Council reported Friday they have spent $1.4 million in total, shattering the record for a council race since the Ethics Commission began tracking campaign finances. The previous spending mark for a council race, according to Ethics Commission records going back to 1989, was also in the 5th District, when a field of four candidates spent $1.1 million in the 1995 primary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 11 candidates competing for the 5th District seat on the Los Angeles City Council reported Friday they have spent $1.4 million in total, shattering the record for a council race since the Ethics Commission began tracking campaign finances. The previous spending mark for a council race, according to Ethics Commission records going back to 1989, was also in the 5th District, when a field of four candidates spent $1.1 million in the 1995 primary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 11 candidates competing for the 5th District seat on the Los Angeles City Council reported Friday that they have spent $1.4 million so far, shattering the record for a council seat since the Los Angeles Ethics Commission began tracking campaign finances. The previous spending mark for a council race, according to Ethics Commission records going back to 1989, was also in the 5th District, when a field of four candidates spent $1.1 million in the 1995 primary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five candidates for Los Angeles City Council on Friday called for LAPD Chief Bernard Parks to be replaced, but two top candidates seeking the 5th District seat disagreed. At a forum, Ken Gerston, Jill Barad, Robyn Ritter Simon, Laura Lake and Joe Connolly said removing Parks is essential to restoring the credibility of the Los Angeles Police Department in the wake of the Rampart Division corruption scandal and plummeting officer morale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five candidates for Los Angeles' 5th City Council District called Friday for Police Chief Bernard C. Parks to be replaced as part of an effort to restore the credibility of the department. Other candidates, including former state Sen. Tom Hayden and former federal prosecutor Jack Weiss, also criticized the chief but did not call for his replacement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As home to many of Los Angeles' most affluent neighborhoods and vibrant cultural institutions, the 5th Council District has lived up to its reputation for political activism by producing the largest field of candidates running for any council seat in the April 10 election. Voters in the district, which extends from Westwood through Bel-Air to Van Nuys, will pick from among 11 candidates--twice the average for other council seats--including former state Sen.
BUSINESS
May 17, 2000 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mattel Inc. is expected to announce today that Robert A. Eckert, president and chief executive of Kraft Foods Inc., is the new chairman and chief executive of the troubled toy manufacturer. Eckert, 45, spent 22 years at Kraft, where he is known for marketing innovations and an ability to turn around poorly performing brands--skills that will be critical at Mattel.
MAGAZINE
August 1, 1999
"Forever Barbie?" (by Debra J. Hotaling, June 27), about Jill Barad, Barbie's "mother" and CEO of Mattel, was quite interesting as it recorded the ups and downs of Barbie over the years and lauded Barad's marketing skills. But I waited for a paragraph or two about the ill-fated decision to offer a tattooed Barbie. That product was apparently quickly withdrawn when parents were faced with the prospect of their 10-year-old daughters wanting to get tattoos like Barbie. I assume that Barad was behind the tattooed Barbie or it would not have been produced.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2002 | Abigail Goldman, Times Staff Writer
Mattel Inc. on Thursday closed the books on what has been called one of the worst acquisitions in corporate history, announcing a $122-million settlement with shareholders over its ill-fated purchase of Learning Co. The El Segundo-based toy maker said it would take a $25.5-million pretax charge in the fourth quarter to cover legal fees and an uninsured portion of the settlement, with the balance to be paid by insurers. Mattel's settlement ranks No.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2000
I was appalled by the details of the deal that Mattel cut with Jill Barad ["Ex-CEO Given $40-Million Exit Deal by Mattel," April 29]. It appears the "good old boy" network is alive and well, and she will surely sit on the boards of the current directors' companies (scratch your back). Only in America do we reward the people at the top for poor performance. We make them rich on the way in and richer on the way out. Every time some grunt gets a 10-cent-an-hour raise, the Fed wants to yell inflation and raise interest rates, but it's OK to give away the store to the top executives of major corporations.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2000 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Toy icon Barbie once complained that "math class is tough," but her former boss is proving adept with a calculator. Troubled toy maker Mattel Inc. disclosed Friday that it paid former Chief Executive Jill Barad a severance package exceeding $40 million. The payout, disclosed in the company's annual proxy statement filed Friday with the Securities and Exchange Commission, comes as the El Segundo-based firm is bleeding red ink and its stock price hovers near historical lows.
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