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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2002 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the first scenes of "Road to Perdition," the taciturn mob enforcer Michael Sullivan, played by Tom Hanks, wends his car down the snowy driveway to his house. Seamlessly, as if the audience were seeing Sullivan's wife and two boys as he would see them through the windshield, the camera captures their reactions to his arrival. In one cut, Sullivan's wife, played by Jennifer Jason Leigh, smiles shyly.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2002 | DANA CALVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the first scenes of "Road to Perdition," the taciturn mob enforcer Michael Sullivan, played by Tom Hanks, wends his car down the snowy driveway to his house. Seamlessly, as if the audience were seeing Sullivan's wife and two boys as he would see them through the windshield, the camera captures their reactions to his arrival. In one cut, Sullivan's wife, played by Jennifer Jason Leigh, smiles shyly.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
For those who have not had the experience, watching Baz Luhrmann's brash take on "William Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet" simulates having a teenager in the house. Like flaming youth everywhere, this film is loud, exuberant and excessive, but it has enough positive energy and dizzying high spirits to make it irresistible.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The witty, steamy and audacious "Erotique" is composed of three deft, sexy tales from three of today's most venturesome female filmmakers--the U.S.' Lizzie Borden, Germany's Monika Treut and Hong Kong's Clara Law. Although the film has been rated NC-17 for explicit sex, "Erotique" is not actually hard-core. The filmmakers' clear intent is not pornographic but rather to express a woman's bemused, often complex, view of sexuality.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
In the decade since "Muriel's Wedding," Australia's Toni Collette has emerged as one of cinema's most beguiling and versatile actresses. Her latest picture, "Japanese Story," a compelling and edgy love story with a twist, offers her a gutsy all-stops-out role worthy of Barbara Stanwyck, and she makes the absolute most of it in one of the year's best screen performances. This stunning film should put its director, Sue Brooks, and writer, Alison Tilson, on the map. With cropped blond hair, Collette's tanned and lean Sandy Edwards is a dynamic take-charge type, a geologist partnered in a Perth, Australia, firm that designs software for the mining industry with Matthew Dyktynski's more laid-back Bill Baird.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I.Q." has one good idea: to cast Walter Matthau as Albert Einstein. Put a shuffling, German-accented Matthau in a sweat shirt, a silvery mustache and lion's mane, and you've got an amusingly convincing take on the man who devised the theory of relativity. Matthau's Einstein, however, dotes on a relative, his pretty mathematician niece Catherine (Meg Ryan), not relativity. Alas, it's writers Andy Breckman and Michael Leeson's notion to have Einstein play matchmaker for Catherine.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2005 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
If you don't know what a libertine is, you could look it up in the Oxford English Dictionary ("a man who is not restrained by morality, esp. in sexual relations") or watch Johnny Depp live the definition in "The Libertine." Believe it or not, you're better off with the OED.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Etonne-moi"--astonish me--ballet impresario Sergei Diaghilev famously encouraged poet Jean Cocteau, and "Moulin Rouge" follows his advice. Most of the time. A fever dream of musical spectacle, its dizzying visual and melodic panache is operatic by intention and excessive by design. This is a flabbergasting piece of work, nakedly out there, willing to risk looking foolish because it is so in love with the head-turning possibilities of the film medium.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Half a century ago, James Stewart, at that point the most beloved of American leading men, decided it was time for something completely different. In a series of bitter, disturbing, early-1950s westerns directed by Anthony Mann--"Winchester '73," "The Naked Spur" and "The Man From Laramie"--Stewart began playing ruthless loners bent on revenge, men capable of rages so terrifying that to experience them is to forget that the sentimental Stewart of "Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Strictly Ballroom" is close to irresistible. Shamelessly derivative but told with unflagging energy and style, it is so awash in good spirits that audiences hungry for pure entertainment will be nibbling on it for some time to come. Sly and sure-footed, "Ballroom" was shot in Australia, made its reputation at Cannes and has already played successfully from Japan to Iceland.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Dish" does a wonderful job of evoking the awesome effect ofthe Apollo 11 mission, which culminated with Neil Armstrong taking, in his own famous words, "one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind," becoming the first person to set foot on the moon on July 20, 1969. It reminds us of how transcendent an event it was, lifting us up for a moment above the petty and mundane affairs of everyday life.
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