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Jill Carroll

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OPINION
February 15, 2006 | Peter Singer, PETER SINGER is a professor of bioethics at Princeton University and the author of "Rethinking Life and Death: The Collapse of Our Traditional Ethics."
JILL CARROLL, the 28-year-old freelance reporter for the Christian Science Monitor who has been held by kidnappers in Iraq since Jan. 7, appeared on a video last week. "Please just do whatever they want," she said. "Give them whatever they want as quickly as possible. There is a very short time. Please do it fast. That's all." What the kidnappers want is for the United States to free the female prisoners it is holding in Iraq, and they have made it clear that if the U.S.
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WORLD
August 10, 2006 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
Marines have arrested four men suspected of kidnapping American journalist Jill Carroll and holding her captive for 82 days early this year, a U.S. military spokesman said Wednesday. The four suspects were detained in Al Anbar province at least a month ago, another officer said. The military decided to release details about the arrests in advance of Carroll's upcoming 11-part series in the Christian Science Monitor detailing her kidnapping and captivity, Army Maj. Gen. William B.
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NATIONAL
April 1, 2006 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
For 82 days, a "FREE JILL" poster hung on the door of the journalism department at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Jill Carroll's alma mater. On Friday, the words were changed to: "JILL IS FREE." Friends, family and colleagues of the 28-year-old freelance journalist, who was kidnapped in Iraq on Jan. 7, finally were able to share their joy the day after she was released. Carroll arrived in Germany early today on a U.S. military flight from Iraq.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Jill Carroll, the journalist held hostage in Iraq for 82 days, arrived at Boston's Logan International Airport. She was reunited with her parents and twin sister a short time later at the headquarters of her employer, the Christian Science Monitor. Carroll, 28, didn't step into public view. Monitor colleagues accompanied her on the commercial flight from Frankfurt, Germany.
WORLD
January 31, 2006 | Solomon Moore, Times Staff Writer
Abducted American journalist Jill Carroll appeared in a video aired by the Al Jazeera satellite TV channel Monday, tearfully pleading for the release of all female detainees in Iraq, an announcer said. The images were the first to be broadcast since her captors issued a video after her Jan. 7 kidnapping. Looking wan and distraught, the freelance reporter for the Christian Science Monitor spoke into the camera, although most of what she said was unintelligible.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2006 | Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writer
Jill Carroll, the American journalist who was held in captivity for 82 days in Iraq, on Saturday sharply disavowed comments she had made as a hostage that were critical of the United States and sympathetic to Islamist rebels. The remarks were made under extreme duress, said Carroll, 28, a freelance journalist who was working for the Christian Science Monitor in Baghdad when she was kidnapped Jan. 7.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Jill Carroll, the journalist held hostage in Iraq for 82 days, arrived at Boston's Logan International Airport. She was reunited with her parents and twin sister a short time later at the headquarters of her employer, the Christian Science Monitor. Carroll, 28, didn't step into public view. Monitor colleagues accompanied her on the commercial flight from Frankfurt, Germany.
WORLD
January 22, 2006 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
On a day that members of a U.S. Islamic group arrived in Baghdad to plead for the release of a kidnapped reporter, the U.S. military announced that two Marines were killed by a suicide car bomber while on a combat mission near Ramadi, a hotbed of insurgent violence. The identities of the Marines killed Friday were being withheld pending notification of next of kin. According to an Associated Press tally, their deaths bring to 2,222 the total U.S. military personnel lost since the U.S.
WORLD
February 11, 2006 | From Associated Press
Kidnappers of American journalist Jill Carroll have threatened to kill her if their demands are not met by Feb. 26, the owner of a Kuwaiti TV channel that aired a new tape of the hostage said Friday. Jassem Boudai, owner of Al Rai satellite channel, said the kidnappers had set "more specific" demands than the release of all Iraqi women from prison, which the group laid down in the first videotape, aired in mid-January by Al Jazeera satellite channel. He refused to elaborate.
WORLD
January 18, 2006 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
An Arab television channel ran a video Tuesday showing kidnapped journalist Jill Carroll with the message from her unnamed captors that she would be killed unless the United States freed all female prisoners in Iraq within 72 hours. The group holding Carroll captive was not identified in the tape broadcast by Al Jazeera. Although the 28-year-old freelance reporter for the Christian Science Monitor appeared to be talking on the tape, her words were inaudible. Carroll was kidnapped Jan.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2006 | Jonathan Peterson, Times Staff Writer
Jill Carroll, the American journalist who was held in captivity for 82 days in Iraq, on Saturday sharply disavowed comments she had made as a hostage that were critical of the United States and sympathetic to Islamist rebels. The remarks were made under extreme duress, said Carroll, 28, a freelance journalist who was working for the Christian Science Monitor in Baghdad when she was kidnapped Jan. 7.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2006 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
For 82 days, a "FREE JILL" poster hung on the door of the journalism department at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Jill Carroll's alma mater. On Friday, the words were changed to: "JILL IS FREE." Friends, family and colleagues of the 28-year-old freelance journalist, who was kidnapped in Iraq on Jan. 7, finally were able to share their joy the day after she was released. Carroll arrived in Germany early today on a U.S. military flight from Iraq.
WORLD
February 27, 2006 | From Associated Press
Iraqi police failed to find kidnapped American journalist Jill Carroll during raids Sunday, as the deadline set for the United States to meet her captors' demands passed with no word on her fate. The 28-year-old freelancer working for the Christian Science Monitor was kidnapped Jan. 7 in Baghdad and was last seen in a videotape broadcast Feb. 9 by the private Kuwaiti television station Al Rai. Station owner Jassem Boudai said then that the kidnappers had set Feb. 26 as the deadline for U.S.
OPINION
February 15, 2006 | Peter Singer, PETER SINGER is a professor of bioethics at Princeton University and the author of "Rethinking Life and Death: The Collapse of Our Traditional Ethics."
JILL CARROLL, the 28-year-old freelance reporter for the Christian Science Monitor who has been held by kidnappers in Iraq since Jan. 7, appeared on a video last week. "Please just do whatever they want," she said. "Give them whatever they want as quickly as possible. There is a very short time. Please do it fast. That's all." What the kidnappers want is for the United States to free the female prisoners it is holding in Iraq, and they have made it clear that if the U.S.
WORLD
February 11, 2006 | From Associated Press
Kidnappers of American journalist Jill Carroll have threatened to kill her if their demands are not met by Feb. 26, the owner of a Kuwaiti TV channel that aired a new tape of the hostage said Friday. Jassem Boudai, owner of Al Rai satellite channel, said the kidnappers had set "more specific" demands than the release of all Iraqi women from prison, which the group laid down in the first videotape, aired in mid-January by Al Jazeera satellite channel. He refused to elaborate.
WORLD
February 10, 2006 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
Jill Carroll, the American reporter kidnapped in Iraq last month, appeared on a new videotape aired by an Arabic-language television channel Thursday night, urging her supporters to do whatever is necessary to obtain her release. Looking more healthy and composed than in her previous appearance, on Jan. 30, the 28-year-old freelancer asked an unnamed third party to quickly comply with the kidnappers' demands.
WORLD
February 10, 2006 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
Jill Carroll, the American reporter kidnapped in Iraq last month, appeared on a new videotape aired by an Arabic-language television channel Thursday night, urging her supporters to do whatever is necessary to obtain her release. Looking more healthy and composed than in her previous appearance, on Jan. 30, the 28-year-old freelancer asked an unnamed third party to quickly comply with the kidnappers' demands.
WORLD
August 10, 2006 | Louise Roug, Times Staff Writer
Marines have arrested four men suspected of kidnapping American journalist Jill Carroll and holding her captive for 82 days early this year, a U.S. military spokesman said Wednesday. The four suspects were detained in Al Anbar province at least a month ago, another officer said. The military decided to release details about the arrests in advance of Carroll's upcoming 11-part series in the Christian Science Monitor detailing her kidnapping and captivity, Army Maj. Gen. William B.
WORLD
January 31, 2006 | Solomon Moore, Times Staff Writer
Abducted American journalist Jill Carroll appeared in a video aired by the Al Jazeera satellite TV channel Monday, tearfully pleading for the release of all female detainees in Iraq, an announcer said. The images were the first to be broadcast since her captors issued a video after her Jan. 7 kidnapping. Looking wan and distraught, the freelance reporter for the Christian Science Monitor spoke into the camera, although most of what she said was unintelligible.
WORLD
January 26, 2006 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
When Jill Carroll was kidnapped, other journalists in Iraq were aghast that something so horrible had happened to someone they knew. But many insisted privately that it never would have happened to them. They would have traveled in an armored car. They would have taken two vehicles so the second, the chase car, could have scared off the gunmen. They never would have gone to that neighborhood. Maybe, maybe not.
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