Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJill Clayburgh
IN THE NEWS

Jill Clayburgh

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is a classic Jill Clayburgh scene in Paul Mazursky's "An Unmarried Woman," the 1978 film the actress will be remembered for most in a career that kept her busy with work nearly until her death on Friday. She's walking down a crowded New York City sidewalk having just learned her husband is leaving her for someone half her age, the fresh wound visible only in those eyes, a soft cornflower blue gone stone cold. She stops to steady herself, throws up, shakes it off, then moves on. Clayburgh had a way of making moments like these so real she would break my heart.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is a classic Jill Clayburgh scene in Paul Mazursky's "An Unmarried Woman," the 1978 film the actress will be remembered for most in a career that kept her busy with work nearly until her death on Friday. She's walking down a crowded New York City sidewalk having just learned her husband is leaving her for someone half her age, the fresh wound visible only in those eyes, a soft cornflower blue gone stone cold. She stops to steady herself, throws up, shakes it off, then moves on. Clayburgh had a way of making moments like these so real she would break my heart.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1991 | NANCY MILLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jill Clayburgh seldom stirs from her cozy New York home these days unless the project is irresistible. She found one in "Reason for Living: The Jill Ireland Story," based on the memoir of the late actress. The story details Ireland's desperate attempts to rid her adopted son of his heroin addiction, all the while dealing with her own breast cancer and her father's deteriorating health. "Characters under duress are the most interesting," Clayburgh says.
NEWS
September 27, 2007
The twice-Oscar-nominated actress returned to series television this week in ABC's snarky soap "Dirty Sexy Money" on Wednesdays at 10 p.m. In it she plays Letitia "Tish" Darling, the matriarch of an impossibly wealthy Gotham clan and keeper of many secrets. Had you been looking to do a TV series when "Dirty Sexy Money" came along? I had done four plays in a row in New York, sort of back to back, and I thought it was time for me to get out of New York. I don't think they could have taken me doing one more play.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1999 | FRANK RIZZO, THE HARTFORD COURANT
In the early 1980s, after a string of hit movies and Oscar nominations, Jill Clayburgh, a feminist icon for her strong and sensitive portrayals of women in an age of great social change, decided to play a different role, one that she fell madly in love with and stayed with for an extended run: mother. At the time, she didn't see it as a career-altering casting change.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1988 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Vikki Baron, upscale housewife and mother, is married to a doctor named Buddy who emotionally abuses her. One afternoon, he announces he's leaving her--just after they've made love. Vikki, devastated, clinging and weeping, begs him to stay. Are you laughing yet? What, you don't think being forced to sell your home, having friends who choose sides and trying to find a job after being unemployed for 17 years is hilarious? CBS' "Who Gets the Friends?"
NEWS
September 27, 2007
The twice-Oscar-nominated actress returned to series television this week in ABC's snarky soap "Dirty Sexy Money" on Wednesdays at 10 p.m. In it she plays Letitia "Tish" Darling, the matriarch of an impossibly wealthy Gotham clan and keeper of many secrets. Had you been looking to do a TV series when "Dirty Sexy Money" came along? I had done four plays in a row in New York, sort of back to back, and I thought it was time for me to get out of New York. I don't think they could have taken me doing one more play.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2006 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
SOME actors need bells and whistles to stage their comebacks. Others do just fine with some dog kibble and a little baby oil. Academy Award-nominated actress Jill Clayburgh, who has spent the last two decades focusing mostly on her children and her family life, makes her first high-profile film appearance in nearly a decade in "Running With Scissors," the film adaptation of the 2002 bestselling memoir.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With "Never Again" New York independent filmmaker Eric Schaeffer successfully teams Jeffrey Tambor and Jill Clayburgh in a middle-aged romance between a pair of wary divorces, only to shoot them down with some of the most tasteless dialogue ever spoken in a mainstream movie. Since Schaeffer has among his credits the effective offbeat romantic comedies "Wirey Spindell" and "Fall," one has to wonder what he was thinking.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Rich in Spring: "Rich in Love," the next movie from the Oscar-winning "Driving Miss Daisy" team, will not open Oct. 23 as planned. In an effort to build more awareness of the movie, MGM announced that it will be released this spring. Richard D. Zanuck and Lili Fini Zanuck are the producers of Alred Uhry's adaptation of Josephine Humphreys' novel starring Albert Finney and Jill Clayburgh. MGM plans to revamp the film's marketing campaign.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2006 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
SOME actors need bells and whistles to stage their comebacks. Others do just fine with some dog kibble and a little baby oil. Academy Award-nominated actress Jill Clayburgh, who has spent the last two decades focusing mostly on her children and her family life, makes her first high-profile film appearance in nearly a decade in "Running With Scissors," the film adaptation of the 2002 bestselling memoir.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With "Never Again" New York independent filmmaker Eric Schaeffer successfully teams Jeffrey Tambor and Jill Clayburgh in a middle-aged romance between a pair of wary divorces, only to shoot them down with some of the most tasteless dialogue ever spoken in a mainstream movie. Since Schaeffer has among his credits the effective offbeat romantic comedies "Wirey Spindell" and "Fall," one has to wonder what he was thinking.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1999 | FRANK RIZZO, THE HARTFORD COURANT
In the early 1980s, after a string of hit movies and Oscar nominations, Jill Clayburgh, a feminist icon for her strong and sensitive portrayals of women in an age of great social change, decided to play a different role, one that she fell madly in love with and stayed with for an extended run: mother. At the time, she didn't see it as a career-altering casting change.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1991 | NANCY MILLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jill Clayburgh seldom stirs from her cozy New York home these days unless the project is irresistible. She found one in "Reason for Living: The Jill Ireland Story," based on the memoir of the late actress. The story details Ireland's desperate attempts to rid her adopted son of his heroin addiction, all the while dealing with her own breast cancer and her father's deteriorating health. "Characters under duress are the most interesting," Clayburgh says.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1988 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Vikki Baron, upscale housewife and mother, is married to a doctor named Buddy who emotionally abuses her. One afternoon, he announces he's leaving her--just after they've made love. Vikki, devastated, clinging and weeping, begs him to stay. Are you laughing yet? What, you don't think being forced to sell your home, having friends who choose sides and trying to find a job after being unemployed for 17 years is hilarious? CBS' "Who Gets the Friends?"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1994 | N.F. MENDOZA
Memorial Day music fare can be heard Sunday night when PBS offers the "National Memorial Day Concert" with Erich Kunzel conducting the National Symphony Orchestra on the lawn of the Capitol building in Washington. The show, hosted by Ossie Davis, features Clint Black, Maureen McGovern, Jill Clayburgh, Mary McDonnell and Colin Powell, retired Army general, at 7:30 p.m. on Channel 28; 4:30 on Channel 15, and 5:30 on Channel 24.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2008 | Sherry Stern
Richard Greenberg, who has written eight plays for Costa Mesa's South Coast Repertory Theatre, including his Pulitzer Prize-winning "Three Days of Rain," will continue the relationship next year with the world premiere of "Our Mother's Brief Affair." The SCR faithful will remember a laugh-so-hard-you-cry reading of the play at the theater's 2007 Pacific Playwrights Festival, starring Jill Clayburgh and Adam Arkin doing their best Jewish mother and son. So it's fitting that the play will premiere at the 12th annual festival, with a run April 3 to May 3 on the Segerstrom Stage.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|