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Jill Davis

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NEWS
May 17, 1987 | Bruce Keppel
Four years ago at the age of 27, Jill Davis became the wine maker at 130-year-old Buena Vista Winery in Sonoma--an appointment notable both because of her youth and her gender in a field traditionally dominated by men.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2007 | Anne Boles Levy, Special to The Times
SOME protagonists suck us in with their personality flaws, becoming anti-heroes whose car wrecks of lives invite rubbernecking. Emily Rhode is more like the driver who cuts into your lane while preoccupied as she talks on a cellphone. Any cursory feeling we can muster can be summed up in a one-fingered wave. Which is a pity, because novelist Jill A.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2007 | Anne Boles Levy, Special to The Times
SOME protagonists suck us in with their personality flaws, becoming anti-heroes whose car wrecks of lives invite rubbernecking. Emily Rhode is more like the driver who cuts into your lane while preoccupied as she talks on a cellphone. Any cursory feeling we can muster can be summed up in a one-fingered wave. Which is a pity, because novelist Jill A.
NEWS
May 17, 1987 | Bruce Keppel
Four years ago at the age of 27, Jill Davis became the wine maker at 130-year-old Buena Vista Winery in Sonoma--an appointment notable both because of her youth and her gender in a field traditionally dominated by men.
SPORTS
April 23, 1985
Eileen Tell, a last-minute replacement for Kate Gompert, upset third-seeded Camille Benjamin 6-2, 7-5 Monday as the $75,000 Virginia Slims of San Diego women's professional tournament opened play at the San Diego Hilton Beach and Tennis Resort. Tell's victory moves her into second-round play against 22-year-old Hu Na, who downed Maeve Quinlan, 6-2, 7-5, in another first-round match Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2006 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Sid Davis, an educational filmmaker in the 1950s and '60s who specialized in dark, cautionary tales crafted to frighten captive classroom audiences away from even thinking about misbehaving, has died. He was 90. Davis died of lung cancer Oct. 16 at the Atria Hacienda senior residence in Palm Desert, said his daughter, Jill. Before John Wayne lent him seed money to start his production company, Davis was best known as Wayne's stand-in on movie sets.
MAGAZINE
October 4, 1987 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
FIVE SKY DIVERS in gray tuxedos dropped out of the sky above the Buena Vista Carneros vineyard where 80 guests were assembled for "the introduction of a commemorative bottling celebrating the winery's 130th anniversary." Looking up in amazement, the guests watched in awed silence as the aerialists made pinpoint landings only yards away, detached themselves from their parachutes and, walking forward, removed magnums of L'Annee from chest pouches and poured forth the celebration wine.
BOOKS
May 12, 2002 | MARK ROZZO
LAST YEAR'S JESUS By Ellen Slezak Theia/Hyperion: 256 pp., $22.95 "Detroit had become a city you leave." So writes Ellen Slezak in this impressive collection of stories whose common antihero is Detroit itself, with its endless grid of charmless suburbs and its hollowed-out center of crumbling apartment blocks. Staying and leaving are central preoccupations for Slezak's Detroit folk, who are mostly Polish and tend to punch the clock at Chrysler Forge and Axle or at GM's Hamtramck Assembly Plant.
FOOD
August 8, 1991 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
With wine sales sluggish nationally, marketing schemes become important. De Los Campos, for instance, is a line of light-styled wines targeted at Latin American and Southwestern cuisine restaurants. Charles Shaw Winery in the Napa Valley makes the two wines in the line, Chardonnay and Tinto. The latter is a Gamay Beaujolais--an excellent choice for drinking with Mexican food, if restaurateurs only knew it.
MAGAZINE
March 29, 1987 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
Some years ago, the longstanding American credo of "doing your own thing" swept through the world of fashion, and what you put on your body became a matter of mixing and matching. Now we've gone a step further, to mixing and matching what goes into the body as well. Nowhere has this trend been more provocative than in the pairing of food and wine. Not that this is a particularly novel phenomenon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1998 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As more African Americans ascend the socioeconomic ladder and move into affluent communities, they are increasingly joining local chapters of venerable organizations such as the NAACP and the National Council of Negro Women, as well as lesser known groups, to give them a sense of community where no traditional black neighborhood exists. Members of The Links, a black women's community service organization, tutor needy children on Saturday mornings.
FOOD
March 26, 1992 | DAN BERGER, TIMES WINE WRITER
I really like Oregon Pinot Noirs. I can imagine the skepticism of regular readers of this column, considering my past expressions of distaste for Oregon Pinots, but you'll just have to take my word. I'm a convert. Like most "trust me" requests, this one requires a load of explanation. It starts with the longstanding hype that Oregon makes Holy Grail Pinot Noirs that are nearly as good as Burgundy, that elevate one to nirvana, etc. I never bought any of that.
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