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Jill Elikann Barad

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BUSINESS
December 10, 1990 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These are the times that try toy makers' souls. Unless, that is, you're sitting on one of the hottest toys to hit--and quickly disappear from--retailer shelves. Jill Elikann Barad of Mattel has found herself in that position this Christmas. And last Christmas. And the one before that. Barad, who two months ago was named president of Mattel's domestic operations--a title she shares with former Tonka executive David M. Mauer--is the brains behind Mattel's latest hit, the Magic Nursery doll.
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NEWS
February 4, 2000 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jill E. Barad, the Mattel Inc. marketing whiz who made Barbie the world's best-selling toy and became an icon for working mothers, resigned under pressure Thursday after the company announced it had lost money during her last year as its chief executive. El Segundo-based Mattel disclosed that it lost $18.4 million during the fourth quarter's crucial holiday season, when toy retailers and manufacturers count on as much as half of their revenue.
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BUSINESS
July 24, 1992 | ANDREA MAIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mattel Inc. promoted Jill Elikann Barad to the posts of chief operating officer and president on Thursday, making her the highest-ranking woman executive in Southern California and one of the highest in the nation. The move was applauded by toy industry analysts, who credited the promotion of Barad, one of two presidents of Mattel USA, to the strong sales she has created for the company's Barbie doll and other girls' toys. "I think it's great," said Carol Palmer of Duff & Phelps.
NEWS
February 4, 2000 | NONA YATES
Jill Barad resigned Thursday as chairwoman and chief executive of Mattel Inc. She started at Mattel in 1981 as a product manager, held various positions and was named chairwoman and CEO in 1997. * Born: May 23, 1951, New York * Residence: Los Angeles * Education: Bachelor of Arts, English and psychology, Queens College, New York, 1973 * Career highlights: Mattel's Barbie doll sales soared under her leadership as marketing director for the brand.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1999 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mattel Inc. responded Friday to mounting criticism of Chief Executive Jill E. Barad by saying its board is still fully supportive of her. The move follows an announcement by the El Segundo-based toy maker earlier this week that its third-quarter earnings will fall short of expectations by as much as 55%. Some in the toy industry, however, questioned whether the statement is anything other than a perfunctory response. None of the directors would address the issue, a Mattel spokesman said.
NEWS
February 4, 2000 | NONA YATES
Jill Barad resigned Thursday as chairwoman and chief executive of Mattel Inc. She started at Mattel in 1981 as a product manager, held various positions and was named chairwoman and CEO in 1997. * Born: May 23, 1951, New York * Residence: Los Angeles * Education: Bachelor of Arts, English and psychology, Queens College, New York, 1973 * Career highlights: Mattel's Barbie doll sales soared under her leadership as marketing director for the brand.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1994
Jill E. Barad, president and chief operating officer at El Segundo-based Mattel Inc., was the highest-paid among California's 100 biggest public companies, pulling down nearly $5.5 million in 1993. Barad who gained distinction for reviving the Barbie doll, Mattel's top-selling product--is one of just two women in the Times' 1993 salary ranking. The other is Marion O. Sandler, co-chief executive of Golden West Financial, who earned $1.8 million.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2000 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN
Who will make big news in the business world this year? Who will emerge from relative obscurity to become a major player? To start the new year, Times business reporters selected people from their beats who they believe will be among those to watch in 2000--in Southern California, across the country and around the world. Some are well known, having made big news in previous years. Others are not exactly household names but nevertheless are likely to make a major impact in their fields.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1998 | George White
Mattel Inc. Chairwoman Jill E. Barad received a 1997 pay and stock options package that could reach a value of $26.2 million, the company said. The compensation included a salary of $1.1 million, compared with the $920,199 she received as president and chief executive in 1996. Barad was appointed chairwoman in October 1997. The El Segundo-based toy maker awarded Barad options to buy 4.9 million common shares, a package with a potential value of $23.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Judith Nelson graduated from law school in 1965, women made up only 4% of her graduating class. There were even fewer female partners at law firms. And there was a prevailing attitude that certain jobs were "women's work"--and law wasn't one of them. Now Nelson is among a small but growing number of women who have made it to the top ranks of California's biggest corporations. Women may still meet resistance in striving to make it into upper ranks, but many believe that the tide is turning.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2000 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN
Who will make big news in the business world this year? Who will emerge from relative obscurity to become a major player? To start the new year, Times business reporters selected people from their beats who they believe will be among those to watch in 2000--in Southern California, across the country and around the world. Some are well known, having made big news in previous years. Others are not exactly household names but nevertheless are likely to make a major impact in their fields.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1999 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mattel Inc. responded Friday to mounting criticism of Chief Executive Jill E. Barad by saying its board is still fully supportive of her. The move follows an announcement by the El Segundo-based toy maker earlier this week that its third-quarter earnings will fall short of expectations by as much as 55%. Some in the toy industry, however, questioned whether the statement is anything other than a perfunctory response. None of the directors would address the issue, a Mattel spokesman said.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1998 | George White
Mattel Inc. Chairwoman Jill E. Barad received a 1997 pay and stock options package that could reach a value of $26.2 million, the company said. The compensation included a salary of $1.1 million, compared with the $920,199 she received as president and chief executive in 1996. Barad was appointed chairwoman in October 1997. The El Segundo-based toy maker awarded Barad options to buy 4.9 million common shares, a package with a potential value of $23.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1997 | From Reuters
Mattel Inc. President and Chief Executive Jill Elikann Barad, one of only two women to head a Fortune 500 company, will succeed John W. Amerman as chairman of Mattel's board of directors, the toy maker said Wednesday. Barad, 46, made her mark at Mattel by leading the effort that helped the Barbie doll achieve astronomical sales growth. She was named president and chief executive of Mattel in January.
BUSINESS
May 29, 1994
Jill E. Barad, president and chief operating officer at El Segundo-based Mattel Inc., was the highest-paid among California's 100 biggest public companies, pulling down nearly $5.5 million in 1993. Barad who gained distinction for reviving the Barbie doll, Mattel's top-selling product--is one of just two women in the Times' 1993 salary ranking. The other is Marion O. Sandler, co-chief executive of Golden West Financial, who earned $1.8 million.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1992 | ANDREA MAIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mattel Inc. promoted Jill Elikann Barad to the posts of chief operating officer and president on Thursday, making her the highest-ranking woman executive in Southern California and one of the highest in the nation. The move was applauded by toy industry analysts, who credited the promotion of Barad, one of two presidents of Mattel USA, to the strong sales she has created for the company's Barbie doll and other girls' toys. "I think it's great," said Carol Palmer of Duff & Phelps.
NEWS
February 4, 2000 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jill E. Barad, the Mattel Inc. marketing whiz who made Barbie the world's best-selling toy and became an icon for working mothers, resigned under pressure Thursday after the company announced it had lost money during her last year as its chief executive. El Segundo-based Mattel disclosed that it lost $18.4 million during the fourth quarter's crucial holiday season, when toy retailers and manufacturers count on as much as half of their revenue.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1997 | From Reuters
Mattel Inc. President and Chief Executive Jill Elikann Barad, one of only two women to head a Fortune 500 company, will succeed John W. Amerman as chairman of Mattel's board of directors, the toy maker said Wednesday. Barad, 46, made her mark at Mattel by leading the effort that helped the Barbie doll achieve astronomical sales growth. She was named president and chief executive of Mattel in January.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1991 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Judith Nelson graduated from law school in 1965, women made up only 4% of her graduating class. There were even fewer female partners at law firms. And there was a prevailing attitude that certain jobs were "women's work"--and law wasn't one of them. Now Nelson is among a small but growing number of women who have made it to the top ranks of California's biggest corporations. Women may still meet resistance in striving to make it into upper ranks, but many believe that the tide is turning.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1990 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
These are the times that try toy makers' souls. Unless, that is, you're sitting on one of the hottest toys to hit--and quickly disappear from--retailer shelves. Jill Elikann Barad of Mattel has found herself in that position this Christmas. And last Christmas. And the one before that. Barad, who two months ago was named president of Mattel's domestic operations--a title she shares with former Tonka executive David M. Mauer--is the brains behind Mattel's latest hit, the Magic Nursery doll.
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