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Jill Esmond

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NEWS
August 1, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jill Esmond, the comely film and stage actress of the 1930s and '40s whose divorce from Sir Laurence Olivier made possible his marriage to Vivien Leigh, has died. Her family told the Associated Press on Tuesday that Miss Esmond, who never remarried, had died Saturday at her home in Wimbledon in southwest London. She was 82 and no cause of death was given. Born Jill Esmond-Moore in London, she was the daughter of dramatist Henry Vernon Esmond and actress Eva Moore.
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NEWS
August 1, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jill Esmond, the comely film and stage actress of the 1930s and '40s whose divorce from Sir Laurence Olivier made possible his marriage to Vivien Leigh, has died. Her family told the Associated Press on Tuesday that Miss Esmond, who never remarried, had died Saturday at her home in Wimbledon in southwest London. She was 82 and no cause of death was given. Born Jill Esmond-Moore in London, she was the daughter of dramatist Henry Vernon Esmond and actress Eva Moore.
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NEWS
October 21, 1989 | Washington Post
It was Laurence Olivier's last production, and it was played at noon Friday by an all-star cast in a grand setting--the stately Westminster Abbey, where the ashes of the late king of the British theater will be buried next year near a bust of Shakespeare. Hundreds of England's best-known performers gathered for a memorial service for Olivier, who died three months ago at age 82.
NEWS
February 25, 1992 | CONSTANCE CASEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Included among the photographs of Laurence Olivier that appear in these pages is this intriguing one: "Aged fourteen, as Katharine in 'The Taming of the Shrew.' " It might be worth the price of the book just to have a look at that picture. The grand English actress Sybil Thorndike, whose children went to the same school, saw young Laurence perform as Kate and found him to be "a perfect little bitch." Olivier would go on to assume 121 stage roles and appear in 58 movies before his death at 82.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2013 | By Susan King
British actress Vivien Leigh had that undefinable star quality. For 30 years, the exquisitely beautiful Leigh captivated film and theater audiences with her well-crafted, magnetic performances. In fact, Leigh won lead actress Oscars for creating two of the most indelible characters in screen history - the strong-willed, manipulative Southern belle Scarlett O'Hara in the beloved 1939 Civil War epic, "Gone With the Wind," and Tennessee Williams' fragile, faded Southern beauty Blanche DuBois in 1951's "A Streetcar Named Desire.
BOOKS
April 10, 1988 | Kenneth Turan, Turan is film critic for Gentlemen's Quarterly
The next sound you hear will be Douglas Fairbanks Jr. dropping a name. And another. And another. And another. And another. Give up yet? Young Doug isn't even breathing hard. If who you knew was a criteria for literary excellence, these agreeable memoirs would be right up there with Caesar's commentaries. When Fairbanks confesses to the habit of "throwing names about like grains of rice at a wedding," he is not kidding. Fairbanks came by the name-dropping habit honestly.
NEWS
September 26, 1997 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Toward the end of 1994, the editor of the London Daily Telegraph persuaded Alec Guinness to begin a diary for publication. This beguiling book is the result. The contents of "My Name Escapes Me" were written between January 1995 and June 1996. "I have been unable to disguise [in the diary] my phobias, irritations, prejudices (though the latter are often short-lived) and my childishness and frivolity," Guinness writes in a brief preface. "Sometimes, I hope, my occasional enthusiasms emerge."
NEWS
July 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
Laurence Olivier, acclaimed as the greatest actor of his generation and the 20th-Century giant of the Shakespearean theater, died today. He was 82. The triple Oscar winner died "peacefully in his sleep," surrounded by friends and relatives at his home south of London, said his agent, Laurence Evans. The cause of death was not given. "His last few days were very peaceful," said Richard Olivier, the actor's 27-year-old son. "He died in his sleep at noon."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
He was first knighted to Sir Laurence and then elevated to a life peerage as Baron Olivier of Brighton, complete with ermine robe (which I believe he rented for his investiture). But Laurence Olivier, who died Tuesday at the age of 82 after a long and courageous battle with crippling illness, thought of himself always and above all else as a working actor.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1994 | Charles Champlin, Charles Champlin is The Times' arts editor emeritus.
No two star actors are alike, of course, and it is far more than a matter of appearances. The survivors are separated from the also-rans because the camera, and the audiences, perceive something beyond the parts and the lines--some internal quality of menace, charm, intensity, wit, sexuality or simply the scars and strengths of real-life experience that are uncommonly interesting. Survive long enough and you become an icon. Hollywood no longer creates icons as numerously as once it did.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1991 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Charles Champlin is the former arts editor of The Times.
The New England mill owner whose factory and thus whose life's work is under siege by the Wall Street marauder played by Danny DeVito in "Other People's Money" is an All-American prototype. He's a standing symbol of an earlier, self-reliant time, stalwart, hickory hard but compassionate, the Golden Rule and the Ten Commandments rolled into one. He is as out of place in the cutthroat world of modern high finance as Ralph Waldo Emerson would be at a disco.
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