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Jill Giegerich

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September 9, 1990 | WILLIAM WILSON
Jill Giegerich has got it but she does not flaunt it. She is among the most gifted and applauded of a younger generation of Los Angeles artists that emerged from the California Institute of the Arts in the '70s and went on to make waves in the international mainstream. At 38, Giegerich is distinctly a hatched talent, but bits of eggshell cling to her as they do to such classmates as Lari Pittman and Mike Kelley.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1990 | WILLIAM WILSON
Jill Giegerich has got it but she does not flaunt it. She is among the most gifted and applauded of a younger generation of Los Angeles artists that emerged from the California Institute of the Arts in the '70s and went on to make waves in the international mainstream. At 38, Giegerich is distinctly a hatched talent, but bits of eggshell cling to her as they do to such classmates as Lari Pittman and Mike Kelley.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
Jill Giegerich forged among the most convincing Post-Mod hybrids of any artist hereabouts. Her meld of Neo-Cubo-Dada is smart, open-ended and fun to look at. The fact that her current show gains virtually nothing but suavity and aplomb is probably not a cause for alarm; the work retains its vigorous and amused sense of metamorphosis.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1987 | CATHY CURTIS
Jill Giegerich was driving screws into a piece of plywood when the buzzer rang to announce a visitor to her downtown Los Angeles studio. After leading the way upstairs, she went back to finish the task, giving her visitor time to take in stacks of wood, trestle tables, a tool chest and neatly organized rows of sketches, one of them labeled "Lenin's Brain."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1987 | CATHY CURTIS
Jill Giegerich was driving screws into a piece of plywood when the buzzer rang to announce a visitor to her downtown Los Angeles studio. After leading the way upstairs, she went back to finish the task, giving her visitor time to take in stacks of wood, trestle tables, a tool chest and neatly organized rows of sketches, one of them labeled "Lenin's Brain."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Staff Writer
If the Museum of Contemporary Art's Temporary Contemporary facility is Los Angeles' Big Top, its new batch of shows is a nine-ring circus--actually 10, if you count the continuing exhibition of the Panza collection. Not that "Summer 1985: Nine Artists"--opening today to museum founders and Sunday to members--is geared to entertainment. There are no dancing bears or tightrope walkers, just nine separate art shows installed as simultaneous attractions.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1987 | ROBERT McDONALD
UCSD's Mandeville Gallery, under the general title "Sculpture Arenas," is presenting the works of six artists based in Southern California. Three of them live in San Diego-- Kenneth Capps, Mathieu Gregoire and Margaret Honda--and three in Los Angeles--Chris Burden, Jill Giegerich and Mark Lere. The most famous with an international reputation is Burden, whose works have often involved elements of personal risk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1997
Re "Boy, 3, Shows Police Father's Marijuana," Dec. 18: Is it just me or is this a scary thing? I believe possession of marijuana should be legalized. Still, what are the future psychological ramifications of decorating as a hero a 3-year-old who turns in his dad? Couldn't this help provoke a lifetime of guilt? This seems like a situation in which discretion and sensitivity would be in order, not a big media hype in which the enormous finger of authority points this kid out to all the world: See, Johnny is a good citizen.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1987
The sixth annual "Awards in the Visual Arts" exhibition, at the Newport Harbor Art Museum through Jan. 3., challenges the notion that New York is the only breeding ground for significant U.S. artists. Administered by the Winston-Salem-based Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, the program honors 10 artists representing 10 areas of the United States, designated according to the density of the artist population.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1987 | HERMAN WONG, Times Staff Writer
Works by 57 California Institute of the Arts alumni, including those based in New York and Los Angeles, are scheduled to be presented Jan. 22 to March 20 at the Newport Harbor Art Museum, museum officials said Wednesday. The survey, "CalArts: Skeptical Belief(s)," was organized by the University of Chicago's Renaissance Society gallery, where the show ran May 6-June 27.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1987 | ROBERT McDONALD
UCSD's Mandeville Gallery, under the general title "Sculpture Arenas," is presenting the works of six artists based in Southern California. Three of them live in San Diego-- Kenneth Capps, Mathieu Gregoire and Margaret Honda--and three in Los Angeles--Chris Burden, Jill Giegerich and Mark Lere. The most famous with an international reputation is Burden, whose works have often involved elements of personal risk.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
Jill Giegerich forged among the most convincing Post-Mod hybrids of any artist hereabouts. Her meld of Neo-Cubo-Dada is smart, open-ended and fun to look at. The fact that her current show gains virtually nothing but suavity and aplomb is probably not a cause for alarm; the work retains its vigorous and amused sense of metamorphosis.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Staff Writer
If the Museum of Contemporary Art's Temporary Contemporary facility is Los Angeles' Big Top, its new batch of shows is a nine-ring circus--actually 10, if you count the continuing exhibition of the Panza collection. Not that "Summer 1985: Nine Artists"--opening today to museum founders and Sunday to members--is geared to entertainment. There are no dancing bears or tightrope walkers, just nine separate art shows installed as simultaneous attractions.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1990
Thanks to William Wilson for a flattering profile (Sept. 9), but I would like to correct a few items that are somewhat embarrassing. He wrote I was dyslexic. I am not and I never said such a thing. While it's true that I do not read French theory, it is not true that I don't know anyone who does. Most of my friends do. What I said was I could think of no one who directly applied art and or social theory to their work, except some feminist artists. Time after time when I am interviewed, no matter how much I stress the influence of my husband (John Mandel)
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