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Jill Halverson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1987
The Downtown Women's Center, a daytime haven for the women of Skid Row, has focused public attention and private money on the concerns of the homeless and the mentally ill since it opened in 1978. Now the center may provide still another example for others in the matter of restoring programs and homes for the homeless after the Oct. 1 earthquake. When director Jill Halverson arrived at the center soon after the quake, she saw that the brick wall in the back of the building had buckled.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1987
The Downtown Women's Center, a daytime haven for the women of Skid Row, has focused public attention and private money on the concerns of the homeless and the mentally ill since it opened in 1978. Now the center may provide still another example for others in the matter of restoring programs and homes for the homeless after the Oct. 1 earthquake. When director Jill Halverson arrived at the center soon after the quake, she saw that the brick wall in the back of the building had buckled.
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NEWS
May 5, 1986 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
Of the first four women to move into the Downtown Women's Center Residence that opened officially last week, one was 75 years old and had been spending her nights at the all-night movies; one transferred from a Skid Row hotel where she had been living in terror ever since all her belongings, including her treasured television, were stolen, and two were essentially homeless, taking temporary shelter with friends.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1987 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Staff Writer
J.R. Murphy was once a Delaware legislator. Hard times left him homeless. But when he drifted into Phoenix, he found a new start--in the country's only officially sanctioned outdoor camp for the homeless. Rehabilitated in this desert setting, Murphy is now a champion of the project, which has gained nationwide attention. One night last fall, a man bearing the identification of a former Delaware state legislator drifted into a camp for the homeless here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1987 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Staff Writer
J.R. Murphy was once a Delaware legislator. Hard times left him homeless. But when he drifted into Phoenix, he found a new start--in the country's only officially sanctioned outdoor camp for the homeless. Rehabilitated in this desert setting, Murphy is now a champion of the project, which has gained nationwide attention. One night last fall, a man bearing the identification of a former Delaware state legislator drifted into a camp for the homeless here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1998
Re "A Milestone at Haven for Homeless Women," Oct. 31: Perhaps it was appropriate that on the 20th anniversary of the Downtown Women's Center your article paid tribute to the vision and perseverance of founder Jill Halverson and to long-term resident Rose. Today, however, the center is more than a safe place for mentally ill women living on the street and 47 elderly, mentally ill residents. It is a facility which, thanks to the vision and perseverance of Caroline McColl, the present director, deals effectively and compassionately with a very different and ever-growing number of younger homeless women--victims of domestic violence, drug abuse and drastic changes in the welfare system.
MAGAZINE
December 15, 1991
While I applaud the efforts of Alice Callaghan and her organization, I think there are other women who have also had a positive impact on the Skid Row area and the people who inhabit it. Tanya Tull, the founder of Para Los Ninos and Beyond Shelter, has created programs that help families with children. Maxene Johnston is president of the Weingart Center, which houses a number of programs, including Skid Row Mental Health and an alcohol recovery program. The Los Angeles Men's Place has Molly Lawry as its executive director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1985
The streets of downtown Los Angeles often resemble an open-air asylum, with obviously ill people shouting at the world or sitting in door-ways, retreating into themselves. Too few of them have a place to go for food, showers or counseling. That is starting to change, with existing programs for women and now with the opening of the Los Angeles Men's Place at 627 San Julian St.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | BETTY GOODWIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Even though there were moments when it felt suspiciously like a peace rally, Tuesday night's fund-raiser for the Shelter Partnership was no '60s flashback. Joan Baez, who provided the evening's entertainment, couldn't resist a chance to to speak out against war. "I'm always grateful to have a platform," she said. But otherwise, the evening's focus was Los Angeles' growing homeless population.
NEWS
April 19, 1987 | Zan Thompson
There is usually a tone, a flavor to every big dinner. At too many of them people are just fulfilling obligations, occupying a chair in the banquet room of the big hotel just long enough to make an unseen exit between the angel food cake with hot fudge sauce and the first speaker. I know people who have been going to big dinners all their lives and who have never made it through to the dinner chairman's last good-night. It's all timing.
NEWS
May 5, 1986 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
Of the first four women to move into the Downtown Women's Center Residence that opened officially last week, one was 75 years old and had been spending her nights at the all-night movies; one transferred from a Skid Row hotel where she had been living in terror ever since all her belongings, including her treasured television, were stolen, and two were essentially homeless, taking temporary shelter with friends.
NEWS
May 3, 1985 | SAM HALL KAPLAN, Times Urban Design Critic
The Downtown Breakfast Club once again has raised a collective critical eyebrow, bestowing its annual "roses & lemons" awards at a gathering Thursday. And once again receiving a lemon was the Beaudry Center, ajarring office and parking complex hovering like some megalith at 3rd City Review Street just west of the Harbor Freeway. Last year, the center received the dubious recognition for its bulky 29-story office tower.
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | BEA MAXWELL
* Betty Clooney Foundation for Persons With Brain Injury raised $550,000 at its sixth annual "Singers' Salute to the Songwriter" benefit concert April 29 at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Ray Charles, Bob Hope, Peggy Lee and Carol Channing were among the performers who volunteered their time to aid the facility and its patients. * Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Community Services Center's national art exhibit and sale held May 3, 4 and 5 netted nearly $300,000.
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