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Jill Ireland

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NEWS
July 29, 1988 | Associated Press
Actress Jill Ireland, who lost her right breast to cancer four years ago, said today the illness has returned but she will fight it with radiation therapy and will power. Ireland, 52, said she learned this week she has a localized malignancy in her lymph nodes, but it is not spreading. She will undergo five weeks of radiation treatment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is a classic Jill Clayburgh scene in Paul Mazursky's "An Unmarried Woman," the 1978 film the actress will be remembered for most in a career that kept her busy with work nearly until her death on Friday. She's walking down a crowded New York City sidewalk having just learned her husband is leaving her for someone half her age, the fresh wound visible only in those eyes, a soft cornflower blue gone stone cold. She stops to steady herself, throws up, shakes it off, then moves on. Clayburgh had a way of making moments like these so real she would break my heart.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1991 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
By all accounts, the late actress Jill Ireland possessed extraordinary courage. To help others, she made public in two books her struggle with breast cancer and her adopted son's drug addiction. "Reason for Living: The Jill Ireland Story," at 9 tonight on Channels 4, 36 and 39, is based on the second book, "Life Lines." Starring Jill Clayburgh, it leans more toward memorial than compelling drama.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1991 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
By all accounts, the late actress Jill Ireland possessed extraordinary courage. To help others, she made public in two books her struggle with breast cancer and her adopted son's drug addiction. "Reason for Living: The Jill Ireland Story," at 9 tonight on Channels 4, 36 and 39, is based on the second book, "Life Lines." Starring Jill Clayburgh, it leans more toward memorial than compelling drama.
NEWS
May 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
Jill Ireland, the British actress whose courageous five-year battle against breast cancer brought hope and inspiration to the ailing and the healthy, died today from the disease. She was 54. Ireland, the wife of her frequent action movie co-star Charles Bronson, died at her Malibu home at 11:30 a.m. Her husband, mother Dorothy, brother John, sons Paul and Valentine McCallum and daughter Zulieka Bronson were with her, said publicist Lori Jonas.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Jason McCallum, adopted son of actor David McCallum and actress Jill Ireland, was found dead in his Laurel Canyon home, police said today. He was 27. McCallum, whose long battle with drug addiction was the subject of a book by Ireland that was published earlier this year, had been undergoing a series of medical treatments at the time of his death, said his personal physician, Dr. Howard Mark.
NEWS
May 3, 1989 | JONATHAN KIRSCH
Life Lines by Jill Ireland (Warner Books: $19.95; 352 pages) By now, you've probably seen a lot of ink about actress Jill Ireland and her new book, "Life Lines," an account of her son's struggle with drug addiction. In these very pages, we've learned that Ireland is again battling for her life against cancer--a once-successful battle that was the subject of her 1984 best seller, "Life Wish." Even so, she is making plans to play herself in a movie based on "Life Lines." Now, after all the hype, comes the chance to actually read the book itself.
NEWS
May 19, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jill Ireland, the British-born actress who bore her private agonies publicly in order to help others, succumbed Friday at her Malibu home to the spreading cancer she had fought for six years. She was 54. She slipped into a coma early Friday and died at 11:30 a.m.
NEWS
November 13, 1989 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since February, Jill Ireland, her husband, Charles Bronson, and their seven children had lived with the specter of death. That was when Ireland's doctor had delivered the chilling news: Her cancer, which had come back after three years, had metastasized. Now there were tumors in her lungs. The prognosis: Two years to live, possibly three. Ireland had sworn, she had cried, then she had done what she had to do if she wanted those precious years.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1991 | NANCY MILLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jill Clayburgh seldom stirs from her cozy New York home these days unless the project is irresistible. She found one in "Reason for Living: The Jill Ireland Story," based on the memoir of the late actress. The story details Ireland's desperate attempts to rid her adopted son of his heroin addiction, all the while dealing with her own breast cancer and her father's deteriorating health. "Characters under duress are the most interesting," Clayburgh says.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1991 | NANCY MILLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jill Clayburgh seldom stirs from her cozy New York home these days unless the project is irresistible. She found one in "Reason for Living: The Jill Ireland Story," based on the memoir of the late actress. The story details Ireland's desperate attempts to rid her adopted son of his heroin addiction, all the while dealing with her own breast cancer and her father's deteriorating health. "Characters under duress are the most interesting," Clayburgh says.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1990
Sammy Davis and Jim Henson, I will miss you. I find it very difficult to think of a world without Davis and Henson--two great men whose talent and imagination gave so much to all of us. I remember the first time I saw Davis in person. It was many years ago, but I was so impressed with how such a big voice could come out of such a little man. Many years later I thought he was wonderful in "Tap," even though the critics didn't like the movie much. In many ways, he left some "big" shoes to fill.
NEWS
April 14, 1989 | BETH ANN KRIER, Times Staff Writer
Call her a cancer patient with an attitude. After being diagnosed with breast cancer in 1984, actress Jill Ireland would sometimes introduce herself to audiences saying, "Hi. My name is Jill. I'm the girl who had everything, including cancer." Now the cancer's back--in her lungs--and Ireland doesn't hesitate to reveal how angry she feels. "Cancer's a (expletive) bore," she insists, explaining that for six days a month she wears a bra with a catheter "leading into my heart down which they pour massive amounts of chemotherapy" to treat the new outbreak of the disease diagnosed this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is a classic Jill Clayburgh scene in Paul Mazursky's "An Unmarried Woman," the 1978 film the actress will be remembered for most in a career that kept her busy with work nearly until her death on Friday. She's walking down a crowded New York City sidewalk having just learned her husband is leaving her for someone half her age, the fresh wound visible only in those eyes, a soft cornflower blue gone stone cold. She stops to steady herself, throws up, shakes it off, then moves on. Clayburgh had a way of making moments like these so real she would break my heart.
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