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Jill Krementz

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NEWS
October 23, 1985 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
The big trouble, in Kurt Vonnegut's view, is our big brains. "Our brains are much too large," Vonnegut said. "We are much too busy. Our brains have proved to be terribly destructive." Big brains, Vonnegut said, invent nuclear weapons. Big brains terrify the planet into worrying about when those weapons will be used. Big brains are restless. Big brains demand constant amusement.
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NEWS
October 6, 1989 | JAMES A. REVSON, Newsday
Last December, Jill Krementz, the well-known photographer, sat quietly in the back seat of a taxicab. Nothing unusual in that, except that the entire East Side was crazed and cranky over "Gorbylock." All around her, cabbies and truckers, pedestrians and passengers fumed and growled over the immovable traffic stalled by the departure of Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. Krementz just sat there and hummed to herself.
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NEWS
October 6, 1989 | JAMES A. REVSON, Newsday
Last December, Jill Krementz, the well-known photographer, sat quietly in the back seat of a taxicab. Nothing unusual in that, except that the entire East Side was crazed and cranky over "Gorbylock." All around her, cabbies and truckers, pedestrians and passengers fumed and growled over the immovable traffic stalled by the departure of Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. Krementz just sat there and hummed to herself.
BOOKS
May 4, 1986 | KRISTIANA GREGORY
Babies are merciless product testers, particularly when it comes to books, which they chew, read upside down, throw, stomp, then offer to the dog. Most likely to survive this affectionate abuse are board books, those sturdy little things with round corners and spongeable pages that are readable even through tooth marks. Now for the child who has outgrown baby themes but still acts like a Sherman tank on maneuvers, is a series of large format (8X10) board books.
BOOKS
May 4, 1986 | KRISTIANA GREGORY
Babies are merciless product testers, particularly when it comes to books, which they chew, read upside down, throw, stomp, then offer to the dog. Most likely to survive this affectionate abuse are board books, those sturdy little things with round corners and spongeable pages that are readable even through tooth marks. Now for the child who has outgrown baby themes but still acts like a Sherman tank on maneuvers, is a series of large format (8X10) board books.
BOOKS
December 22, 1996 | From the introduction by John Updike
THE WRITER'S DESK by Jill Krementz, introduction by John Updike (Random House: 114 pp., $35). I look at these photographs with a prurient interest, the way that I might look at the beds of notorious courtesans. Except that the beds would tell me less than these desks do. Here the intimacy of the literary act is caught in flagrante delicto: At these desks characters are spawned, plots are spun, imaginative distances are spanned. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dean Brelis, 82, a journalist who worked as a foreign correspondent for NBC, CBS and Time magazine and wrote novels and nonfiction books, died Friday of complications from throat cancer at his daughter's home in Santa Monica. Born Constantinos Christos Brelis on April 1, 1924, to Greek immigrants in Newport, R.I., he enlisted in the Army in 1942 and was soon assigned to work in military intelligence for the Office of Strategic Services. While stationed in Burma, he received a Bronze Star.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1989 | LIBBY SLATE
For most of her 20 years, Katherine Healy has led a double life. In 1983 at age 14, she became the first U.S.-born ballerina and the youngest dancer ever to win a Gold Medal at the prestigious International Ballet Competition of Varna, Bulgaria. She has performed extensively in Europe and Japan, and even before her victory had worked with such greats as George Balanchine and Jacques D'Amboise.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | MARY YARBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Mary Yarber teaches English and journalism at Santa Monica High School. She writes a weekly column on education for The Times
Coping with parents' divorce can be the most traumatic experience in youth and, most teachers agree, it often hurts the child's schoolwork. I've seen a few students maintain their performance during a family breakup, but most show common reactions such as inattention, lack of interest, unpredictable misbehavior and frequent truancy. Why do some kids survive a divorce better than others?
NEWS
October 23, 1985 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
The big trouble, in Kurt Vonnegut's view, is our big brains. "Our brains are much too large," Vonnegut said. "We are much too busy. Our brains have proved to be terribly destructive." Big brains, Vonnegut said, invent nuclear weapons. Big brains terrify the planet into worrying about when those weapons will be used. Big brains are restless. Big brains demand constant amusement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1991 | MARY YARBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Mary Yarber teaches English and journalism at an area high school. She writes an occasional column on education for The Times
The death of a close family member is a profoundly upsetting event in the life of a child or a teen-ager, and it is almost certain to seriously affect the child's performance in school. In the classroom, grieving children often show disinterest, misbehavior and, eventually, poor grades. But, as I discussed last week in a column dealing with parental divorce, it's possible for a parent, another family member or a close friend to help a student handle grieving.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1992 | MARY LAINE YARBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Mary Laine Yarber teaches English at an area high school
The traditional family--consisting of two biological parents and their offspring living under one roof--has become less common. In its place are families made up of various combinations of adults and children. Although this trend is not new, living in a family that is different from others can sometimes cause problems for children. The pain and confusion often affect children's confidence, concentration and ability to communicate and form bonds with peers. And most learning materials don't help.
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