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Jill Sprecher

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"13 Conversations About One Thing" is about as far removed from a Hollywood movie as a film can be and still have familiar stars and a traditional narrative form--albeit with some deft shifts back and forth in time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sister screenwriting team of Jill and Karen Sprecher put their hearts, souls, experiences and much of their life savings into their new film, "13 Conversations About One Thing"--a movie whose genesis was a devastating event in Jill's life. One character in the film, which opened Friday, suffers a severe brain injury after she's the victim of a hit-and-run auto accident.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sister screenwriting team of Jill and Karen Sprecher put their hearts, souls, experiences and much of their life savings into their new film, "13 Conversations About One Thing"--a movie whose genesis was a devastating event in Jill's life. One character in the film, which opened Friday, suffers a severe brain injury after she's the victim of a hit-and-run auto accident.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"13 Conversations About One Thing" is about as far removed from a Hollywood movie as a film can be and still have familiar stars and a traditional narrative form--albeit with some deft shifts back and forth in time.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1998 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Clockwatchers," which premiered at the 1997 Sundance Film Festival, is the estrogen version of a celebrated alumnus of that year's festival, "In the Company of Men." It explores how the soulless machinery of the workplace can destroy the spirit and reduce worker drones to, if not exactly the amoral monsters of Neil LaBute's scabrous work, then at least unpleasantly petty bickerers.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2001 | BRIAN WINGFIELD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The 58th edition of the Venice Film Festival kicks off today with 146 films and a new twist on one of the world's oldest festivals: two competitions instead of one. Both competitions will award a Golden Lion prize when the festival ends Sept. 8. Twenty films will screen in the Venice 58 competition, and 21 films in Cinema of the Present, a new section promoting cutting-edge movies.
NEWS
December 12, 2002 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
Films about women searching for meaning in their lives dominated the top nominations for the 2003 IFP Independent Spirit Awards announced Wednesday morning. "Lovely and Amazing," "Far From Heaven," and "The Good Girl," each starring female leads in complex, emotional performances, received the most nominations. In addition to those films, best picture nominees were "Secretary" and "Tully."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1996
MOVIES Let the Games Erupt: Fanning the flames of the dueling volcano movies, Universal Pictures announced that the release date of "Dante's Peak" would be moved up from March 7 to Feb. 7. Twentieth Century Fox's "Volcano" is scheduled to surface on Feb. 28. "This comes as no surprise," said Fox senior executive vice president Tom Sherak. "They've been trying to make this happen for awhile--spending a fortune to get their special effects done."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2001 | JOHN CLARK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This year's Toronto International Film Festival is the morning after--not to be confused with a hangover--following last year's 25th anniversary festivities. Unlike last year's mega-bash, this year's festival reverts to form--a non-flashy, never vulgar, pleasantly innocuous venue for a staggering number of films (326 this year, 175 of which are making their world or North American premieres).
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2001 | JOHN CLARK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The movies went on, after a day's delay, but the feeling was anything but business-as-usual at the film festival here as filmmakers, actors, publicists and journalists grappled with the surreal mixture of make-believe entertainment and real-world tragedy. The terrorist attacks left hundreds here frantically trying to reach friends and relatives in New York and figure out a way to get back home, buying train tickets and renting cars for the 12-hour drive back to the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2002 | JOHN CLARK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There's a documentary in competition at this year's Sundance Film Festival, titled "Sister Helen," that features a 69-year-old Benedictine nun who epitomizes everything many non-New Yorkers feel about New York. Sister Helen runs a residence for substance abusers in the worst part of the Bronx, and she's crusty, sarcastic, overbearing, foul-mouthed and generally not interested in social niceties. She's the spiritual equivalent of the classic New York cabdriver.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2005 | Carina Chocano
MOVIES with realistic, nuanced portrayals of women are so rare that when they do appear they can seem like revelations. My top picks include films both new and old whose female characters are portrayed in a humanistic light. Whether they are funny, sad, romantic or wry, what the films have in common is female characters who are complicated, flawed and, above all, recognizably human.
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