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Jim Abbott

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SPORTS
June 1, 1989 | MIKE PENNER, Times Staff Writer
The tighter the camera zooms in on Jim Abbott, the more of the story it loses, for no portrait of Abbott can be considered complete without considering the people around him. Take a look at the little one-handed boy in the Angel cap, sprinting alongside a practice field at the Angel training camp because he spotted Abbott warming up at the other end. Watch the youngster growing up across the street from Abbott's home in Flint, Mich.,...
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SPORTS
March 19, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter, Los Angeles Times
TEMPE, Ariz. - Bill Lachemann was on the same Dorsey High baseball team as legendary manager Sparky Anderson. He played his first professional game five years before Angels rising star Mike Trout's father was born and caught former Angels pitcher Jim Abbott's first bullpen session four years after qualifying for an AARP card. He turns 79 next month, and he is 27 years older than the team that employs him, the Angels. And what he does now is what he's been doing for decades: produce major league ballplayers.
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SPORTS
November 15, 1992 | JON HEYMAN, NEWSDAY
The Yankees rejected a proposed trade for Angel left-hander Jim Abbott last weekend, although both sides say a deal is still possible. It is believed the declined proposal featured Yankees first base prospect J.T. Snow plus one of their top three pitching prospects: Mark Hutton, Sterling Hitchcock or Sam Militello.
SPORTS
August 3, 2012 | By Chris Foster
The Angels acquired Zack Greinke from Milwaukee to shore up their rotation. He has already delivered a strong outing in his local debut Sunday, though he probably wished he'd packed power hitter Ryan Braun in his carry-on luggage after a 2-0 loss to Tampa Bay. The right-hander makes his second Angels start Friday in Chicago against the White Sox. The deal for the 2009 American League Cy Young Award winner marked the eighth time the Angels have...
SPORTS
March 21, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
Jim Abbott made a lasting impression not only on Angels fans, but also those who celebrate a validation of the human spirit. Born without a right hand, Abbott won a gold medal with the 1988 U.S. Olympic baseball team, was a first-round draft pick, won 54 games for the Angels in 1989-92 and 1995-96 stints and threw a no-hitter for the New York Yankees in 1993. Abbott, who is now 44 and resides in Southern California, and former Times and current Yahoo Sports baseball writer Tim Brown have produced an autobiography of the pitcher's journey: "Imperfect: An Improbable Life," due in bookstores on April 3. Brown noted that beyond Abbott's accomplishments, "why he's choosing to tell his story" is appetizing.
SPORTS
June 1, 1998 | Associated Press
Former major league pitcher Jim Abbott threw four innings in a class-A game Sunday, just two days after the Chicago White Sox announced they had signed him to minor-league contract. Abbott, who was released by the Angels during spring training last year, gave up one run, three hits, two walks and struck out two while starting for the Hickory Crawdads of the South Atlantic League.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2012 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times
Imperfect An Improbable Life Jim Abbott and Tim Brown Ballantine: 288 pp., $26 Like so many young men, Jim Abbott grew up wanting to fit in with everybody else while simultaneously wishing to be celebrated for being uncommonly adept at something/anything. In Abbott's case, he was adept at baseball, a game difficult enough with two hands. Abbott was born with just one. This is his story, of dreaming of being twice as good with half the tools. If this whole notion seems a little pat, give Abbott a chance.
SPORTS
March 8, 1988 | Associated Press
Pitcher Jim Abbott, who was born without a right hand and became the first U.S. pitcher to beat Cuba in Cuba in 25 years, was named winner of Sullivan Award as the nation's top amateur athlete Monday. Abbott, 20, of Flint, Mich., plays for the University of Michigan and led Team USA last summer, with an 8-1 record and a 1.70 earned-run average, to a silver medal in the Pan American Games. As a sophomore at Michigan last year, he started 15 games and finished the season with an 11-1 record.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1997 | DANA PARSONS
I seldom lament the plight of people who have banked millions of dollars before they turn 30. In fact, it takes everything I've got not to cook up some reason to blast them. So along comes a guy like Jim Abbott, baseball player, who once turned down a contract worth $16 million. Now his Angels career may be over (again) and, perhaps, the end of his baseball career is also in sight. We should feel something for this guy? The answer is yes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1993
Let's examine the facts: Jim Abbott said he wanted to stay, yet rejected the Angels' offer of $16 million over four years. Instead of living and playing in Southern California, he has to live and play in New York, deal with the New York press, fans and Steinbrenner. All this for a little more than half of what the Angels offered (and only one year). Am I missing something? SCOTT SULLIVAN, Rancho Santa Margarita
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2012 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times
Imperfect An Improbable Life Jim Abbott and Tim Brown Ballantine: 288 pp., $26 Like so many young men, Jim Abbott grew up wanting to fit in with everybody else while simultaneously wishing to be celebrated for being uncommonly adept at something/anything. In Abbott's case, he was adept at baseball, a game difficult enough with two hands. Abbott was born with just one. This is his story, of dreaming of being twice as good with half the tools. If this whole notion seems a little pat, give Abbott a chance.
NEWS
March 24, 2012 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Kendrys Morales defused a potentially awkward situation Friday night when he took the blame for a dash from third base that resulted in the slugger having to stop on his twice surgically repaired ankle and retreat back to the bag. Morales, who hit his first home run in almost two years in the second inning of a 4-1 exhibition victory over the Cleveland Indians at Goodyear Ballpark, singled in the fourth and advanced to third with one out. ...
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Melissa Rohlin
Atlanta Braves third baseman Chipper Jones announced Thursday that he will retire after this season. “I have fulfilled everything,” Jones said during a tearful news conference at the team's spring training stadium in Kissimmee, Fla. “There's nothing left for me to do.” Jones, who turns 40 in April, has spent his entire 18-season career with the Braves, a phenomenon that has become somewhat of a rarity in professional sports....
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Tempe, Ariz. -- Most established position players use spring training to get into "baseball shape," to find their timing and rhythm at the plate, while putting very little emphasis on results. Which is why Angels veteran outfielder Bobby Abreu, a 38-year-old entering his 16th big-league season, is not concerned about the .115 average (three for 26) he took into Thursday's exhibition game against the Kansas City Royals. "I just want to feel good with my swing, with my legs, with my body, and to make good contact," Abreu said.
SPORTS
March 21, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
Jim Abbott made a lasting impression not only on Angels fans, but also those who celebrate a validation of the human spirit. Born without a right hand, Abbott won a gold medal with the 1988 U.S. Olympic baseball team, was a first-round draft pick, won 54 games for the Angels in 1989-92 and 1995-96 stints and threw a no-hitter for the New York Yankees in 1993. Abbott, who is now 44 and resides in Southern California, and former Times and current Yahoo Sports baseball writer Tim Brown have produced an autobiography of the pitcher's journey: "Imperfect: An Improbable Life," due in bookstores on April 3. Brown noted that beyond Abbott's accomplishments, "why he's choosing to tell his story" is appetizing.
SPORTS
June 18, 2006 | Tim Brown
I wondered if Jim Abbott holds any sympathy for today's ballplayers, given that so many are unable to play the game without a crutch. How fortunate he must consider himself, I thought, born so strong and determined, and to have pitched 10 major league seasons with such grace and humility. In a flawed world, some people get all the breaks. He was making plans Friday to leave for a vacation to his home state of Michigan, where he and his wife and two daughters spend their summers.
SPORTS
April 16, 1989 | DON PATTERSON
There were 46,846 curious people at Anaheim Stadium for the Angels' first Saturday night home game. Their curiousity was understandable because pitcher Jim Abbott was about to make his major league debut. One fan was not particularly curious, though maybe that was not quite so understandable. His name was Dan Siegler. He just wanted to watch a ballgame, so much so that he turned down three dates to a Sadie Hawkins dance. Abbott, as nearly everybody knows by now, has one hand.
SPORTS
April 25, 1989 | JOHN WEYLER, Times Staff Writer
Jim Abbott has spent his life bucking the odds, but when you're a pitcher and your team doesn't score, the odds against winning are such that even a man blessed with Abbott's tenacity can't overcome them. In his first two outings as a professional, Abbott's teammates welcomed him to the big leagues by failing to score. The last time a team scored behind him in a game that counted, Abbott was pitching in the 1988 Seoul Olympics. Monday night in Anaheim Stadium, Abbott got start No. 3 and the Angels managed to score three runs.
SPORTS
October 27, 2002 | Bill Shaikin, Bill Plaschke, Jason Reid, Mike DiGiovanna, Diane Pucin, From Staff Reports
Jim Abbott, one of the most popular players in Angel history, is scheduled to throw out the ceremonial first pitch before Game 7 tonight. Abbott, who inspired youngsters by achieving his dream of pitching in the major leagues despite being born without a right hand, jumped directly from the U.S. Olympic team in 1988 to the major leagues with the Angels in 1989. He pitched a no-hitter for the New York Yankees in 1993.
SPORTS
April 4, 2001 | ERIC SONDHEIMER
They stare, they whisper, they wonder. That's the reaction of spectators when they see sophomore Alex Elliott ofMarshallHighpitchfor the first time. Then it hits them. "He's like Jim Abbott," someone observes. Elliott was born without a right hand, just like Abbott, who pitched 11 seasons in the major leagues. After Elliott releases the ball, he transfers his glove from his right arm to his left hand, catches the ball from the catcher and repeats the routine.
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