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Jim Angle

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August 13, 1990 | PHIL WEST
It's curious, to say the least, that an established, award-winning White House correspondent would leave his post to anchor a business show centered in Long Beach. But 43-year-old radio journalist Jim Angle believes that his transition from covering politics to covering economics is a reflection of the growing importance of business news in world affairs. "Now, much more than any time in the past, economic reforms are leading and pulling along political reforms," he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1990 | PHIL WEST
It's curious, to say the least, that an established, award-winning White House correspondent would leave his post to anchor a business show centered in Long Beach. But 43-year-old radio journalist Jim Angle believes that his transition from covering politics to covering economics is a reflection of the growing importance of business news in world affairs. "Now, much more than any time in the past, economic reforms are leading and pulling along political reforms," he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1995 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The letter read simply: "You seem to understand that business is important, but not as important as life itself." Coming, as it did, from a listener during the first year of "Marketplace," the half-hour business show heard on 270 public-radio stations around the country, that correspondence served as a kind of gauge for Jim Russell, the program's creator and executive producer, assuring him that he was having the intended effect.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1993 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Taming 'The River Wild?': Environmental groups are going up against Universal Pictures' "The River Wild" again. On Friday, two groups appealed to the film's star, Meryl Streep, to abandon filming part of the movie on a protected section of Oregon's Rogue River. The Oregon Natural Resources Council and Wilderness Watch also said they would ask the U.S. Forest Service to overturn permits granted to Universal that allow jet boats, helicopters and other gear in a federal wilderness area.
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
It was a Saturday night in Ventura, and the Momentum Gallery was alive with the sounds of poetry. Poetry and Presley. "It's alternating-sonnets and Elvis," said George Keenen, founder of the Arcade Poetry Project and organizer of the event earlier this month. The program was titled "Sonnets to Elvis," and Keenen spoke in the moments before the advertised 8 p.m. starting time. Behind him sat a boom box bearing an Elvis tape.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | By Jon Healey
Polls have consistently shown that even though the public opposes Obamacare, people like some of its most significant provisions. That's particularly true of the requirement that insurers ignore preexisting conditions when signing up customers for coverage. Yet that one provision, also known as guaranteed issue, is responsible for trade-offs that people bitterly oppose. Here are two good illustrations of this dichotomy. In The Times on Monday, Soumya Karlamangla reported on the plight of some of those who aren't poor enough to qualify for Medi-Cal, the insurance program for Californians with incomes near the poverty line.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1993 | ROBERT EPSTEIN
Public broadcasting must have this thing about voices. What you generally hear are natural, organic, unadulterated health-food store voices. No preservatives added. The voices are slow and subdued. Electronic Zen. Into that great democratic mix of voices has come Amanda Greenleaf Whelan. She calls herself, depending on residence, "The Waitress From Nashville" or "The Waitress at Large."
NEWS
October 19, 1988 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, Times Staff Writer
Just before midnight and just after deadline, reporters and political operatives with Michael S. Dukakis' campaign began filing into the bar at the Bonaventure Hotel. The final presidential debate had ended a few hours earlier. And the psychology of loss was already setting in, like plaster of Paris, around them. "It will be the death march to Bataan," bellowed one famous network correspondent a little too loudly. "A wake," said another, raising a glass of Scotch in agreement.
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