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Jim Aubrey

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1986 | PAUL ROSENFIELD
Once upon a time, in what would seem like another galaxy, James Thomas Aubrey ran CBS and then MGM. He was one of those people who people in show business talked about, incessantly. In the press--and in best-selling novels--he was the prototype star executive, larger than life. Now he's returned to continue the legend. "I thought my days on the Red Eye were over," said Jim Aubrey, dryly.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1994 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Thomas Aubrey Jr., who presided over retrenchment at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and the resurgence of CBS in tenures that were marked by creativity and callousness, has died, it was reported Friday night. His son, James W. Aubrey, said the executive who brought "The Beverly Hillbillies," "The Dick Van Dyke Show," "Green Acres" and many other top-rated programs into the nation's living rooms, was 75. Aubrey--the first man to head a film studio and a TV network--died of a heart attack Sept.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1990 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1982, the book "Indecent Exposure" zeroed in on forgeries and embezzlement by then-Columbia Pictures production chief David Begelman. Three years later, "Final Cut" documented how spiraling costs on the film "Heaven's Gate" triggered the downfall of United Artists. Now comes "Fade Out: The Calamitous Final Days of MGM," an examination by former MGM/UA senior vice president Peter Bart of the decline of the Culver City studio under the 20-year aegis of financier Kirk Kerkorian.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1990 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1982, the book "Indecent Exposure" zeroed in on forgeries and embezzlement by then-Columbia Pictures production chief David Begelman. Three years later, "Final Cut" documented how spiraling costs on the film "Heaven's Gate" triggered the downfall of United Artists. Now comes "Fade Out: The Calamitous Final Days of MGM," an examination by former MGM/UA senior vice president Peter Bart of the decline of the Culver City studio under the 20-year aegis of financier Kirk Kerkorian.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1994 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James Thomas Aubrey Jr., who presided over retrenchment at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and the resurgence of CBS in tenures that were marked by creativity and callousness, has died, it was reported Friday night. His son, James W. Aubrey, said the executive who brought "The Beverly Hillbillies," "The Dick Van Dyke Show," "Green Acres" and many other top-rated programs into the nation's living rooms, was 75. Aubrey--the first man to head a film studio and a TV network--died of a heart attack Sept.
NEWS
August 21, 1986 | From Associated Press
Entertainer Mickey Rooney was in good spirits Wednesday, albeit with a tender nose as he recovered from a dog bite administered by a friend's Doberman pinscher in Westlake Village, a spokesman said. Rooney was visiting Monday with his friend, producer Jim Aubrey, and playing with Aubrey's dog when the bite occurred, publicist Red Doff said. Aubrey took Rooney, 65, to Westlake Hospital where his nose was stitched up.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 1986 | PAUL ROSENFIELD
On the face of it--and the closer you get to him--Johnny Carson seems not very different from other people. He has one best friend he trusts implicitly. He has a beautiful girlfriend he met on the beach. He drives himself to work, to the same job he's had for 24 years. He has three sons and three divorces. He works out regularly, yet smokes excessively. He's dallied with alcohol, but not on the job. He can be mischievous.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | GORDON PARKS
In the late 1960s, Gordon Parks achieved yet another milestone when Warner Bros. gave him the opportunity to direct, write the screenplay and compose the music for the film of his first novel, "The Learning Tree." Here is Part V of a five-part excerpt from his autobiography, "Voices in the Mirror." For years I, with everyone else, had justifiably believed that Hollywood would never accept a black director.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1985 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
'And there it is!" exclaimed American Film Institute Director Jean Firstenberg with a flourish as she pointed to State of California Check No. 421-887925. Although Gregory Peck and State Treasurer Jesse Unruh were right beside her, the $6.7-million check--dated Dec. 21, 1984--was clearly the star.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1990 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood was quite a closed place 22 years ago, when Gordon Parks became one of the film industry's first black directors. Parks let out a big laugh from beneath his white walrus mustache. "Closed? . . . It still is." Parks reflected for a moment, then added: "I think Hollywood has loosened up somewhat, but it's still difficult. You're still considered more or less a 'black director.' You should be considered as an artist." But, Parks said, "I think Hollywood has not reached that point.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1986 | PAUL ROSENFIELD
Once upon a time, in what would seem like another galaxy, James Thomas Aubrey ran CBS and then MGM. He was one of those people who people in show business talked about, incessantly. In the press--and in best-selling novels--he was the prototype star executive, larger than life. Now he's returned to continue the legend. "I thought my days on the Red Eye were over," said Jim Aubrey, dryly.
NEWS
January 18, 1985
The Music Center's resident dance company, the Joffrey Ballet, came home Wednesday night with a premiere performance (first for Los Angeles) of John Cranko's "Romeo and Juliet" and the applause and the bravos were loud and long. Robert Joffrey, the company's artistic director and founder, dedicated the opening night performance to the memory of Gabriele Murdock. Standing before Tony Duquette's sunburst curtain on the stage of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Joffrey spoke about Mrs. Murdock.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1987 | PAUL ROSENFIELD
Mike Ovitz, generally agreed to be the most powerful agent in Hollywood, took a call from a friendly, longtime competitor. The call was about a star (and very bankable) character actor whom Ovitz wanted to sign at Creative Artists Agency (CAA). The other agent didn't want to lose his star. "You have everyone else in town," said the competitor. "Must you have this actor, too?" Ovitz understood immediately. The actor stayed with the competition--and stayed a character actor.
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