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Jim Baca

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NEWS
March 22, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
FUELING CHANGE: A top Clinton appointee is literally driving home his crusade to get Americans to switch to motor vehicles powered by compressed natural gas. Jim Baca, nominated to head the Bureau of Land Management, has a family van that runs on the stuff. "I strongly believe in natural gas as an alternative clean fuel, and it gets us away from our dependence on foreign oil. Also, it helps natural gas sales in New Mexico," said Baca, who was formerly the state's lands commissioner.
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NEWS
February 4, 1994 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Baca, the Clinton Administration's embattled Bureau of Land Management director, resigned under pressure Thursday after angering a host of Western legislators and governors with his efforts to reform the management of public lands. Baca's departure is the first sign of open dissension between the Administration and environmentalists over how aggressively to press for change in the use of public lands by miners, ranchers and the timber industry.
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NEWS
January 29, 1994 | From the Washington Post
Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt backed down from a plan to replace one of his senior land managers, agreeing Friday to allow Bureau of Land Management Director Jim Baca to remain in his post. Babbitt's about-face concluded an embarrassing and awkward episode for the Clinton Administration during which environmentalists rallied to Baca's defense and he refused to accept a new post.
NEWS
January 29, 1994 | From the Washington Post
Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt backed down from a plan to replace one of his senior land managers, agreeing Friday to allow Bureau of Land Management Director Jim Baca to remain in his post. Babbitt's about-face concluded an embarrassing and awkward episode for the Clinton Administration during which environmentalists rallied to Baca's defense and he refused to accept a new post.
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | From Associated Press
Bureau of Land Management Director Jim Baca, who has pushed for aggressive public land reform, has been offered a new job within the Interior Department, a spokesman acknowledged Thursday. The disclosure came after environmentalists began inquiring about "rumors" that Baca was being ousted because of his pro-environmental views on land reform, including Western grazing.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Baca, the Clinton Administration's embattled Bureau of Land Management director, resigned under pressure Thursday after angering a host of Western legislators and governors with his efforts to reform the management of public lands. Baca's departure is the first sign of open dissension between the Administration and environmentalists over how aggressively to press for change in the use of public lands by miners, ranchers and the timber industry.
NEWS
October 15, 1987
U.S. District Judge Dickran Tevrizian has told the ABC Unified School District to allow the Parents Teachers Students Assn. to use the computer at Whitney High School to publish the association's newsletter. The district administration and the PTSA agreed to abide by the judge's suggestion that the association be allowed to use the school computer at least four hours a week to put out the newsletter and other needed business, said Jim Baca, attorney for the district.
NEWS
November 7, 1993 | RITA BEAMISH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Clinton Administration on Friday urged government whistle-blowers to tell the truth about environmental problems in federal agencies, but also to work cooperatively. Employees who gathered at a two-day convention to share stories of retribution and federal wrongdoing heard from four high-level Clinton Administration officials, including Energy Secretary Hazel O'Leary.
SPORTS
September 29, 2000 | From Associated Press
Bill Bavasi, fired by the Angels last year for not building a pennant-winning team quickly enough, wasn't surprised the U.S. team he helped pick won the Olympic gold medal. "I don't have a reason to feel vindicated, because we knew what we were getting into," said Bavasi, who picked the roster along with former Yankee general manager Bob Watson. ". . .We also knew we had real good pitching and a pretty good club overall." U.S.
NEWS
November 13, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Attorney Xavier Suarez defeated millionaire banker Raul Masvidal in a runoff election Tuesday to become the city's first Cuban-born mayor. With 100% of the votes from all 85 precincts and absentee ballots reported in unofficial totals, Suarez had 31,662 votes, or 56.7%, to 24,224 votes, or 43.3%, for Masvidal, who also was born in Cuba. "I want to thank all of Miami," said Suarez, who will be sworn in today. "I congratulate Xavier Suarez for his victory," Masvidal told disappointed supporters.
NEWS
January 28, 1994 | From Associated Press
Bureau of Land Management Director Jim Baca, who has pushed for aggressive public land reform, has been offered a new job within the Interior Department, a spokesman acknowledged Thursday. The disclosure came after environmentalists began inquiring about "rumors" that Baca was being ousted because of his pro-environmental views on land reform, including Western grazing.
NEWS
March 22, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
FUELING CHANGE: A top Clinton appointee is literally driving home his crusade to get Americans to switch to motor vehicles powered by compressed natural gas. Jim Baca, nominated to head the Bureau of Land Management, has a family van that runs on the stuff. "I strongly believe in natural gas as an alternative clean fuel, and it gets us away from our dependence on foreign oil. Also, it helps natural gas sales in New Mexico," said Baca, who was formerly the state's lands commissioner.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated Latino leaders are stepping up pressure on President Clinton to put more Latinos in top Administration posts. The heads of several national Latino organizations acknowledge that few jobs of any kind have been filled in the slow-moving appointment process. Yet they are concerned--in some cases angry--about the small number of Latinos on short lists of potential nominees for more than 1,000 top Administration jobs.
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