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Jim Bailey

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1996
Singer-impressionist Jim Bailey will perform a benefit in the Aid for AIDS Cabaret Series on Saturday at the home of director-producer John Bowab. Tickets are $100. Reservations: (213) 656-6085.
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NEWS
October 28, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
When Jim Bailey saunters onstage as a living image of Judy Garland, the impact is instantaneous -- the voice, the songs, the look, the style. The only way to describe it is as an all-encompassing illusion, as utterly convincing character acting. That's a definition that suits Bailey, who constantly underscores his insistence upon being seen as an actor who sings, rather than as a female impersonator, an impressionist or a drag queen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jim Bailey has made his reputation via astounding impressions of Judy Garland, Barbra Streisand and Peggy Lee. So what was one to expect when Bailey opened at the Cinegrill on Tuesday, performing as Jim Bailey, singing a program of standards accompanied by a backup trio of musicians? A surprisingly low-key show, for one thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Jim Bailey provides extravagant fun as Tallulah Bankhead in Charles Rome Smith's unwieldy "Tallulah and Tennessee" at Theatre West. Primarily a stage star, Bankhead was known for her flamboyance and cutting wit. Most theatergoers today never saw her in person and probably aren't very familiar with her relatively obscure movies or TV appearances.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1986 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Who is Kay Goodman this week? Goodman, that irrepressible crooner who knocks 'em dead in "Nite Club Confidential" at the Tiffany Theatre, was threatening to become a rotational role. First, there was Fay DeWitt. Then, suddenly, Edie Adams. And now, just as abruptly, Jim Bailey, who has made a living impersonating the kinds of singers of whom Goodman is a farcical, campy composite. This is a performance, though, not an impersonation.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1993 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The best drag queens have always made an extravagant show of plumping up the icons of their affections, such as Katharine Hepburn, Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Tallulah Bankhead and Carol Channing, and then standing aside to turn out those images in gaudy camp display, as though they were there to outdo the originals. Jim Bailey walks a finer line.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
Jim Bailey is one of a kind--an authentic original. His one-man Judy Garland show, "Broadway to Hollywood," which opened to a roomful of enthusiastic celebrities at the Hollywood Roosevelt Cinegrill on Wednesday night, was a startlingly evocative experience. Bailey's description of himself as an illusionist, rather than an impressionist or--even less appealingly--as an impersonator, was an accurate portrayal of his unusual work.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | LIBBY SLATE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Libby Slate writes regularly for The Times
Barbra Streisand may not ever tour again, but you can still catch her act Sun day at the Academy Plaza Theatre. That's when illusionist Jim Bailey will be strutting his Streisand stuff--fingernails, blond wig and all--performing "People," "The Way We Were" and other numbers from the singing star's shows. His two hourlong concerts, with opening act Kaye Ballard, are part of the "Show of the Month," a musical series designed for audiences older than 50.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1990 | LAUREN LIPTON
Stop by the Hollywood Roosevelt tonight, and you'll swear Judy Garland has returned from somewhere over the rainbow to entertain in the hotel's Cinegrill Lounge. The woman on stage looks, talks and certainly sings like Judy . . . but she's not Judy. In fact, she is really a he--Jim Bailey, whose one-woman, er, man, act runs Wednesdays through Saturdays. Bailey, who also does shows as Barbra Streisand and Peggy Lee, may put on women's clothes, but don't call him a female impersonator.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1986 | Pat H. Broeske
First, there was Luke and Laura. Now there's . . . Tony and Jim. Former "General Hospital" heartthrob Tony Geary has found a new on-screen romantic interest--"illusionist" Jim Bailey. In "Penitentiary III," now shooting around town for Cannon Films, Bailey does his entire role in drag. He portrays "Cleopatra," Geary's cellmate (and very close buddy). "I play this guy who's been imprisoned for murder and who'll never get out," Bailey told us, laughing much of the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jim Bailey has made his reputation via astounding impressions of Judy Garland, Barbra Streisand and Peggy Lee. So what was one to expect when Bailey opened at the Cinegrill on Tuesday, performing as Jim Bailey, singing a program of standards accompanied by a backup trio of musicians? A surprisingly low-key show, for one thing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1996 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Becky Bailey-Findley recalls how, as a little girl, she spent summers tagging along with her father, who worked in the livestock area of the Orange County Fair. "I was a fair brat. I literally grew up around here," she said. Bailey-Findley, 42, now sits at the fair's helm as general manager, in charge of the fair's events and its 1,100 employees. She is the state's only female GM among the top four county fairs, which also include those in Sacramento, Los Angeles and San Diego counties.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1996
Singer-impressionist Jim Bailey will perform a benefit in the Aid for AIDS Cabaret Series on Saturday at the home of director-producer John Bowab. Tickets are $100. Reservations: (213) 656-6085.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1996 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you believe what you read and hear--especially from news sources--pop music is a primarily young person's game. Chalk it up to the youth-orientation of the media and the pop-culture machine. But in the San Fernando Valley, entertainment options for older audiences are surprisingly plentiful of late. Friday night at the Alex Theatre, as part of the big band series there, the "Stars of the Lawrence Welk Show" will tap into the fan base of Welkies.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | LIBBY SLATE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Libby Slate writes regularly for The Times
Barbra Streisand may not ever tour again, but you can still catch her act Sun day at the Academy Plaza Theatre. That's when illusionist Jim Bailey will be strutting his Streisand stuff--fingernails, blond wig and all--performing "People," "The Way We Were" and other numbers from the singing star's shows. His two hourlong concerts, with opening act Kaye Ballard, are part of the "Show of the Month," a musical series designed for audiences older than 50.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1993 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Impressionists, satirists and comedy writers are pondering whether imitation--often regarded as the sincerest form of flattery--may also be the quickest way to a lawsuit. Comedian Rich Little, car dealer Cal Worthington and others said they were gauging the impact of a Supreme Court ruling this week that will allow "Wheel of Fortune" hostess Vanna White to seek damages for an advertisement depicting a futuristic female robot game-show hostess turning the letters on a game-show board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1996 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Becky Bailey-Findley recalls how, as a little girl, she spent summers tagging along with her father, who worked in the livestock area of the Orange County Fair. "I was a fair brat. I literally grew up around here," she said. Bailey-Findley, 42, now sits at the fair's helm as general manager, in charge of the fair's events and its 1,100 employees. She is the state's only female GM among the top four county fairs, which also include those in Sacramento, Los Angeles and San Diego counties.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Jim Bailey provides extravagant fun as Tallulah Bankhead in Charles Rome Smith's unwieldy "Tallulah and Tennessee" at Theatre West. Primarily a stage star, Bankhead was known for her flamboyance and cutting wit. Most theatergoers today never saw her in person and probably aren't very familiar with her relatively obscure movies or TV appearances.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1993 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The best drag queens have always made an extravagant show of plumping up the icons of their affections, such as Katharine Hepburn, Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Tallulah Bankhead and Carol Channing, and then standing aside to turn out those images in gaudy camp display, as though they were there to outdo the originals. Jim Bailey walks a finer line.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1990 | LAUREN LIPTON
Stop by the Hollywood Roosevelt tonight, and you'll swear Judy Garland has returned from somewhere over the rainbow to entertain in the hotel's Cinegrill Lounge. The woman on stage looks, talks and certainly sings like Judy . . . but she's not Judy. In fact, she is really a he--Jim Bailey, whose one-woman, er, man, act runs Wednesdays through Saturdays. Bailey, who also does shows as Barbra Streisand and Peggy Lee, may put on women's clothes, but don't call him a female impersonator.
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