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Jim Blinn

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BUSINESS
August 9, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Mathematics can be as beautiful as sculpture," Jim Blinn, a pioneer of computer graphics, once told graduating students at New York's Parsons School of Design. For Blinn and others in his field, mathematics is sculpture. Chipping away at equations and shaping chunks of computer code, they create the virtual images used in everything from NASA flight simulations to Hollywood movies.
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BUSINESS
August 9, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Mathematics can be as beautiful as sculpture," Jim Blinn, a pioneer of computer graphics, once told graduating students at New York's Parsons School of Design. For Blinn and others in his field, mathematics is sculpture. Chipping away at equations and shaping chunks of computer code, they create the virtual images used in everything from NASA flight simulations to Hollywood movies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1987 | CHARLES SOLOMON
For anyone interested in computer animation, the international film and video show at the annual SIGGRAPH (Special Interest Group for Computer Graphics) conference is the equivalent of the network fall premieres: Scientists and artists unveil their newest work amid considerable hoopla. This year's show, which debuted Tuesday night and ended Thursday at the Anaheim Convention Center, appeared to represent the state of the technology, rather than the state of the art.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2011 | By Charles Solomon, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Walt Disney famously said, "I only hope that we never lose sight of one thing — that it was all started by a mouse. " For the Pixar artists, it was all started by a lamp. Twenty-five years ago (Aug. 17, 1986), "Luxo, Jr.," a short depicting the misadventures of a rambunctious little desk lamp and his weary father, premiered in Dallas and did something no computer-animated film had done before: It made audiences laugh. The first film from Steve Jobs' newly formed company Pixar and the second from director John Lasseter, "Luxo" launched the most successful and innovative animation studio since Walt Disney's heyday in the 1930s.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2007 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
In a dark room inside NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Canada Flintridge, Koji Kuramura is giving space exploration the showbiz treatment. The 41-year-old animator once guided the starship Enterprise when he helped craft "Star Trek" episodes. Now he's building a virtual launch pad for the Phoenix rocket that will blast off in August to survey Mars' polar ice caps. His work will be part of a five-minute computer-animated film that will simulate a front-row view.
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