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Jim Boswell

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October 27, 2003 | Mark Arax and Rick Wartzman, Times Staff Writers
In the middle of California, in a county called Kings, his empire rises from the bottom of an old lake. It was once the largest body of freshwater west of the Mississippi, a land of 10 million geese. In the spirit of his forebears, he sucked the lake dry and made the rivers run backward, carving out the biggest cotton farm in the world: 150,000 acres of pancake-flat earth.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2003 | Mark Arax and Rick Wartzman, Times Staff Writers
In the middle of California, in a county called Kings, his empire rises from the bottom of an old lake. It was once the largest body of freshwater west of the Mississippi, a land of 10 million geese. In the spirit of his forebears, he sucked the lake dry and made the rivers run backward, carving out the biggest cotton farm in the world: 150,000 acres of pancake-flat earth.
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NEWS
March 13, 1988 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles--the hardest-working charity city in America--rates Midas-touch congratulations on a billion benefits. Not the least of which, April 30, will be the bright lights and "going, going, gone!" of the ninth annual Group Effort Dinner Auction at the Beverly Wilshire. Bob Abell, premier auctioneer, gets the fun of auctioning off a personalized violin autographed by Jack Benny, an Alaskan fishing trip, a Shar-pei puppy. . . . Ed and Lynn Hogan are chairmen.
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
Standing tall, the Art Center College of Design's president David Brown remarked, "I am so happy not to be the tallest thing here tonight." He's 6-foot-8. He was standing next to Alyce Williamson, chairman of the center's first (and not to be its last) Imagination Ball. In full, white regalia, she was the incredible Snow Queen--a mass of Ruben Panis feathers, beads, glitter, with a cloak of feathers and an ascending hat of feathers.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1989 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
"I'd like one low-fat popcorn, two frozen yogurts and an iced cappuccino, please." No, this isn't an order at one of those upscale gourmet food stores. But if current trends in the motion picture business continue, it could be a typical 1990s snack offering at the local movie house. Sound good? Then how about La-Z-Boy-like "rocker" seats, no-wait concession stands, bone-crunching sound systems and the predicted demise of sardine-can-size theaters.
BOOKS
October 12, 2003 | Malcolm Margolin, Malcolm Margolin is the publisher of Berkeley-based Heyday Books, which specializes in works on California. Recent books include "At Work: The Art of California Labor," "California Poetry: From the Gold Rush to the Present" and "Under the Fifth Sun: Latino Literature from California."
After an abortive trip to the Central Valley, Ansel Adams wrote: "I have returned from 1,000 miles of haze, smog, [and] general dullness.... Might be rich, but it ain't attractive." Although I have fought against this kind of smug dismissal for years, citing the rich if often hidden cultural and natural features of the valley, Adams' words came to haunt me on a recent drive through the Boswell cotton farms of Kings County at the southern end of the San Joaquin Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1990 | TRACEY KAPLAN and PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Workers at the General Motors factory in Van Nuys paid little attention when a new attendant was hired last year to service vending machines scattered throughout the plant. But union officials now say the attendant was keeping a closer watch on his fellow workers than on the machines. Last month, a year after the attendant was hired, 18 assembly line and other workers were suspended from their jobs amid allegations of narcotics trafficking and theft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1990 | TRACEY KAPLAN and PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Workers at the General Motors factory in Van Nuys paid little attention when a new attendant was hired last year to service vending machines scattered throughout the plant. But union officials now say the attendant was keeping a closer watch on his fellow workers than on the machines. Last month, a year after the attendant was hired, 18 assembly line and other workers were suspended from their jobs amid allegations of narcotics trafficking and theft.
BOOKS
December 7, 2003
American Expressionism Art and Social Change 1920-1950 Bram Dijkstra Harry N. Abrams/Columbus Museum of Art: 272 pp., $60 This is a marvelous, passionate and irritating book that proposes to retrieve a once-powerful movement in American painting from the rubbish heap of art history. That lost Depression-era movement has been sloppily labeled Social Realism by the clerks of academic art criticism, with their iron need for categories.
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