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Jim Bouton

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SPORTS
May 26, 1999 | ARA NAJARIAN
What: "Ball Four" a book by Jim Bouton. Thirty years after Jim Bouton started taking notes in the Seattle Pilots' dugout, the story is still a great ride. If you're a baseball fan and you have not read this book, find it and read it. It is rated at least PG-13 by today's standards, so parents beware. But there still may not be a better book that gives the reader a look at what it is like to be a major league player. It also is a fine piece of history.
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SPORTS
July 24, 2011 | Jerry Crowe
Rocky Bridges never took himself too seriously. A major league journeyman, minor league manager and major league coach, he joked that he didn't like the national anthem because every time he heard it, he had a bad day. In truth, every day in baseball was a great day for Everett Lamar Bridges, whose infectious enthusiasm and proclivity for making people laugh superseded his playing ability. "I had fun playing baseball," he says. "Many of the players now, I'm not sure they have fun playing the game.
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SPORTS
July 26, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY
The buzz started among the media on the field Saturday as soon as he began the walk down the ramp from the clubhouse to the dugout. "Who is it?" a young photographer asked, thinking maybe Joe DiMaggio. "Bouton," a guy told her. She gave him a puzzled look. "Jim Bouton," the guy said. "Used to pitch for the Yankees, wrote a book, was persona not grata around here for awhile." Twenty-eight years, to be exact.
SPORTS
May 26, 2002 | Mal Florence
Former big league pitcher Jim Bouton, author of the classic book "Ball Four," warns Jose Canseco about writing a tell-all book about major league baseball because it won't have the same impact. What's left to expose? "To top what goes on in the news, he would have to find a pro athlete who has killed three or more people," Bouton said. "And on the medical side he'd have to find not just steroid use, but somebody who is now pitching with cloned body parts. "Other than that, he's behind the curve."
SPORTS
May 26, 2002 | Mal Florence
Former big league pitcher Jim Bouton, author of the classic book "Ball Four," warns Jose Canseco about writing a tell-all book about major league baseball because it won't have the same impact. What's left to expose? "To top what goes on in the news, he would have to find a pro athlete who has killed three or more people," Bouton said. "And on the medical side he'd have to find not just steroid use, but somebody who is now pitching with cloned body parts. "Other than that, he's behind the curve."
SPORTS
July 24, 2011 | Jerry Crowe
Rocky Bridges never took himself too seriously. A major league journeyman, minor league manager and major league coach, he joked that he didn't like the national anthem because every time he heard it, he had a bad day. In truth, every day in baseball was a great day for Everett Lamar Bridges, whose infectious enthusiasm and proclivity for making people laugh superseded his playing ability. "I had fun playing baseball," he says. "Many of the players now, I'm not sure they have fun playing the game.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | RICHARD SANDOMIR, Sandomir is a New York-based free-lance writer
Jim Bouton, perennial pariah of Major League Baseball, arrives at semipro Bassanio Field wearing a bemused grin above his orange tank top, baseball pants, socks and spikes. In his right hand is a plastic box containing a newly passed kidney stone--his career 20th. His teammates on the Little Ferry Giants crowd around him to mock and gawk. "It's a macho thing to them," says Bouton, 51, who will pitch tonight. "They think I'm real tough."
SPORTS
October 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court today burst former major leaguer Jim Bouton's hopes of winning a big-stakes contract battle over a baseball bubble gum product that resembles chewing tobacco. Bouton, a former pitcher and best-selling author, lost an appeal to revive a $1-million damage award. The justices, without comment, let stand a ruling that threw out the award against a subsidiary of the Wrigley chewing gum company.
SPORTS
March 7, 1997 | HOUSTON MITCHELL
Big League Chew comes in a pouch and is shredded like tobacco. It even features a caricature of a baseball player on the front. And the product has definite ties to major league baseball. One day, while sitting in a minor league bullpen in Portland, Ore., former major leaguer Jim Bouton, who played for the Yankees, Astros, Seattle Pilots and Atlanta Braves, and teammate Rob Nelson decided to come up with an alternative to chewing tobacco.
SPORTS
May 26, 1999 | ARA NAJARIAN
What: "Ball Four" a book by Jim Bouton. Thirty years after Jim Bouton started taking notes in the Seattle Pilots' dugout, the story is still a great ride. If you're a baseball fan and you have not read this book, find it and read it. It is rated at least PG-13 by today's standards, so parents beware. But there still may not be a better book that gives the reader a look at what it is like to be a major league player. It also is a fine piece of history.
SPORTS
July 26, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY
The buzz started among the media on the field Saturday as soon as he began the walk down the ramp from the clubhouse to the dugout. "Who is it?" a young photographer asked, thinking maybe Joe DiMaggio. "Bouton," a guy told her. She gave him a puzzled look. "Jim Bouton," the guy said. "Used to pitch for the Yankees, wrote a book, was persona not grata around here for awhile." Twenty-eight years, to be exact.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | RICHARD SANDOMIR, Sandomir is a New York-based free-lance writer
Jim Bouton, perennial pariah of Major League Baseball, arrives at semipro Bassanio Field wearing a bemused grin above his orange tank top, baseball pants, socks and spikes. In his right hand is a plastic box containing a newly passed kidney stone--his career 20th. His teammates on the Little Ferry Giants crowd around him to mock and gawk. "It's a macho thing to them," says Bouton, 51, who will pitch tonight. "They think I'm real tough."
SPORTS
April 30, 1987
Ralph Kiner has a book called "Kiner's Korner," and Bruce Keidan of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette says, "It is astonishingly good." Kiner, a New York Mets announcer since the team's inception, naturally tells some Yogi Berra stories, including the one about Yogi's attempts on the road to reach his wife Carmen by phone. He spent four hours dialing their home in northern New Jersey without getting an answer. Finally, he succeeded in reaching her. "Where have you been?" he demanded.
SPORTS
February 4, 2003 | John Scheibe
A consumer's guide to the best and worst of sports media and merchandise. Ground rules: If it can be read, heard, observed, viewed, dialed or downloaded, it's in play here. One exception: No products will be endorsed. What: "Baseball: A Literary Anthology." Editor: Nicholas Dawidoff. Publisher: The Library of America. Price: $35.
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