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Jim Brulte

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2003 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
During California's budget crisis, he played a leading role in one of the state's most tortuous dramas. But in the state's latest act, the recall election of Gov. Gray Davis, Senate GOP Leader Jim Brulte has been nearly invisible, far removed from the spotlight. That's exactly how Brulte likes it. For the most part, he has been little more than an interested observer who has yet to endorse a candidate and only reluctantly voiced support for the recall weeks after it qualified for the ballot.
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OPINION
March 6, 2013
Re "New leader urges GOP to leave 'comfort zone,'" March 4 Jim Brulte, the new chairman of the California Republican Party, urges members to leave their "comfort zone. " Republicans need to resonate with the rapidly changing population of this state, and yet the party chose as chairman a white male conservative from Rancho Cucamonga. As a registered Republican since 1947, I was taken aback by this irony. It is quite obvious that my fellow Republicans still do not get the message.
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NEWS
February 10, 1995 | JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assembly Republicans this week accomplished the seemingly impossible: Their leader finally has a Capitol office nearly as big and expensive and prestigious as that of their Democratic nemesis, Assembly Speaker Willie Brown. In a development that speaks as much about the Republicans' rise as Brown's diminished power, GOP leader Jim Brulte did the political equivalent of moving uptown, leaving the Capitol's drab east wing for a third-floor office in the 126-year-old restored west wing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2013 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - One of Jim Brulte's first acts Sunday as the newly elected leader of the California Republican Party was to hand-deliver a $50,000 check from a friend, with the promise of another one this week. They will only dent the state party's debt, which is in the high six figures, but Brulte's ability to tap a vast network of donors is among the reasons that the former legislative leader was elected to try to salvage the beleaguered party. "Look, wherever - wherever - there is a willing heart and a checkbook that's willing to write a $5, $10, $15, $20, $50, $100, $1,000, $10,000 check, I'll go," Brulte told reporters after the weekend's party convention ended.
NEWS
March 9, 1995 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the unwritten rules of politics in this town is that legislators grant "access" to lobbyists who give them campaign donations. It's unwritten for good reason: At best, it looks bad to voters back home; at worst, lawmakers who grant access in exchange for donations are in line for a call from the FBI.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2013 | By Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Desperate to return to relevance, the battered California Republican Party is looking for salvation in a shrewd dealmaker and prolific fundraiser once known for advancing his party's interests in a Capitol dominated by Democrats. Jim Brulte, a former Senate and Assembly minority leader forced from the Legislature by term limits in 2004, is the odds-on favorite to be chosen state GOP leader at the party's convention here next month. His plans for a rebirth focus, at the moment, on shoring up the basics: the fundraising operation, get-out-the-vote apparatus, data analysis capabilities and recruitment efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2013 | By Seema Mehta, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - One of Jim Brulte's first acts Sunday as the newly elected leader of the California Republican Party was to hand-deliver a $50,000 check from a friend, with the promise of another one this week. They will only dent the state party's debt, which is in the high six figures, but Brulte's ability to tap a vast network of donors is among the reasons that the former legislative leader was elected to try to salvage the beleaguered party. "Look, wherever - wherever - there is a willing heart and a checkbook that's willing to write a $5, $10, $15, $20, $50, $100, $1,000, $10,000 check, I'll go," Brulte told reporters after the weekend's party convention ended.
NEWS
December 7, 1994 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republican Richard Mountjoy of Arcadia finds himself in the vortex of a political firestorm. He has been elected to both the Assembly and the Senate, has taken the oath of office in the lower house, while apparently participating in the election of Republican leaders in the Senate, though he has yet to take the oath of office there. If Mountjoy leaves the Assembly, his departure may tilt the 40-40 tie for Speaker in favor of veteran Democrat Willie Brown.
NEWS
January 11, 1995 | From a Times Staff Writer
Assembly Democrats and Republicans met behind closed doors most of the day Tuesday, but failed to come up with a solution to resolve the speakership crisis. About 4:30 p.m., former Speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco) emerged to announce that the offices of the lower house were being closed to allow Assembly employees to get home by dark, when another major storm was expected to hit the Sacramento area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 2000 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Ross Johnson of Irvine resigned Thursday as minority leader of the state Senate, explaining he must devote more time to care for ailing family members. Johnson, 60, said he will continue to campaign for reelection to his Senate seat. "I'm healthy as a horse," he said. The man who has held the Republicans' top post for two years was immediately replaced by Sen. Jim Brulte of Rancho Cucamonga, chairman of the upper chamber's 15-member GOP minority, the No. 2 official in the party hierarchy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - The Republican Party has become so pathetic in California that it can't even find a candidate to run for governor next year. Correct that. It isn't even looking. Wouldn't know where to begin. The party's in no position to recruit anyway. It has little to offer. Certainly not a brand name, not in a state where the GOP steadily has been losing market share. Definitely not money. The party's deep in debt. Actually, neither major party historically has had to recruit top-of-ticket candidates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - "There's no place to go but up," asserted Jim Brulte, whose mission is to save the California Republican Party. "We're on the way back. " Brulte told me that in 2000 at the Republican National Convention in Philadelphia. He was the state Senate minority leader then. And was he ever wrong! The California GOP did make a brief resurgence under Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who was never fully accepted or appreciated by party activists. But in recent years, it has been going down, down, down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2013 | By Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Desperate to return to relevance, the battered California Republican Party is looking for salvation in a shrewd dealmaker and prolific fundraiser once known for advancing his party's interests in a Capitol dominated by Democrats. Jim Brulte, a former Senate and Assembly minority leader forced from the Legislature by term limits in 2004, is the odds-on favorite to be chosen state GOP leader at the party's convention here next month. His plans for a rebirth focus, at the moment, on shoring up the basics: the fundraising operation, get-out-the-vote apparatus, data analysis capabilities and recruitment efforts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2006 | Michelle Keller, Times Staff Writer
Sitting in a classroom at North Hollywood High School on Monday, senior Lacey Padgett thought taxing the rich to balance California's budget sounded like a fine idea. But then former Republican state Senate leader Jim Brulte pointed out that celebrities including Tiger Woods and Serena and Venus Williams have relocated to Florida, where state income taxes are nonexistent. Padgett said the comment gave her pause.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2004 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
When Sen. Jim Brulte left his post as minority leader of the California Senate last month because of impending term limits, he appeared destined for the political pasture. But don't write his political obituary just yet. Brulte may be easing out of the limelight, but colleagues and political pundits who have watched the Republican's ascension in the Legislature predict he will continue to be a dominating force in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2004 | George Skelton
Amid the usual mid-May Capitol commotion over a governor's budget revision, an era quietly ended this week: the era of Jim Brulte, Republican leader. Brulte, 48, of Rancho Cucamonga, stepped down as long planned from his pivotal perch as Senate minority leader. He was replaced by Sen. Richard Ackerman, 61, of Irvine, whom Republican senators selected for the post last fall. It was all very smooth -- in sharp contrast to the era that lasted more than a decade.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assembly Minority Leader Jim Brulte was struck in the right arm by a BB fired by a teen-ager who evidently missed a tree that was his target, the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department reported Thursday. Brulte, a Rancho Cucamonga Republican, was hit as he was on the 14th green of the Lake Arrowhead Country Club on Tuesday evening. The shot, investigated as an assault with a deadly weapon, was fired from a wooded area above the golf course.
OPINION
March 6, 2013
Re "New leader urges GOP to leave 'comfort zone,'" March 4 Jim Brulte, the new chairman of the California Republican Party, urges members to leave their "comfort zone. " Republicans need to resonate with the rapidly changing population of this state, and yet the party chose as chairman a white male conservative from Rancho Cucamonga. As a registered Republican since 1947, I was taken aback by this irony. It is quite obvious that my fellow Republicans still do not get the message.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2003 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
During California's budget crisis, he played a leading role in one of the state's most tortuous dramas. But in the state's latest act, the recall election of Gov. Gray Davis, Senate GOP Leader Jim Brulte has been nearly invisible, far removed from the spotlight. That's exactly how Brulte likes it. For the most part, he has been little more than an interested observer who has yet to endorse a candidate and only reluctantly voiced support for the recall weeks after it qualified for the ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2003 | Peter Nicholas, Times Staff Writer
If there ever is a resolution to the state's $38-billion budget impasse, it will depend in large measure on whether two powerful men in the Senate reach agreement -- Democratic leader John Burton and his Republican counterpart, Jim Brulte. The thinking is that if Burton and Brulte can strike a compromise, their respective delegations will go along and the Assembly will be pressured to follow.
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