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Jim Burt

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SPORTS
November 1, 1989 | From Times wire services
The San Francisco 49ers today signed former New York Giants nose tackle Jim Burt to fill the void created when Michael Carter went down with a right foot injury in Sunday's 23-10 victory over the Jets. Burt, who played with the Giants through the 1988 season, is best known by 49er fans as the player who put Joe Montana in the hospital during the 1986 NFC Championship game at the Meadowlands. Burt, 30, who has a history of back problems, retired under pressure from the Giants in the off-season.
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SPORTS
September 27, 1991 | CHRIS BAKER
Quarterback Jay Schroeder said the Raiders' scoring slump can't be blamed on injuries to the offensive line. "It's a combination of things," Schroeder said. "It's not just one specific thing. You can't pin it on one group. You just can't. If you're being honest after watching the films, it's everybody, and everybody has got to get better at what they do." The Raider offense has been inconsistent this season. "One series you look great and the next series it just blows up," Schroeder said.
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NEWS
January 26, 1987 | RANDY HARVEY, From Staff and Wire Reports
New York nose tackle Jim Burt has been known to go into the stands after games to celebrate with fans. But in this game, he had one of the fans come to him. He had his wife bring his 4-year-old son, Jimmy, to him on the sidelines in the fourth quarter. "We had the game won with about four minutes to play," Burt said. "I wanted him on the field with me. He's my pride and joy."
SPORTS
January 29, 1990 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
When the New York Giants won the 1987 Super Bowl in Pasadena, the Denver Broncos were the victims, and Jim Burt was the subject of postgame television focus in an emotional hugging celebration with his son, Jimmy, age 5. When the San Francisco 49ers won the 1990 Super Bowl on Sunday in New Orleans, the Denver Broncos were the victims, and Jim Burt was the subject of postgame television focus in an emotional hugging celebration with his son, Jimmy, age 8.
SPORTS
July 22, 1989 | Associated Press
Jim Burt, the starting nose tackle on the New York Giants' Super Bowl-winning team three years ago, announced his retirement Friday night. General Manager George Young said Burt, an eight-year veteran who has been plagued by back problems for much of his career, told team officials he made his decision Thursday. The Giants open training camp next week. "He's been a wonderful player for us and it's very difficult when players who have put so much into it realize it's his time," Young said.
SPORTS
March 28, 1989 | From Times wire services
Jim Burt, an eight-year veteran and a member of the New York Giants' 1986 Super Bowl champions, has turned down a $950,000 contract offer from the Green Bay Packers and will remain with New York, according to a published report. "Money wasn't the thing," Burt told the New York Times. "I want to stay in the area. I have great rapport with the fans. . . . When you see respect there, you know the grass isn't greener on the other side.
SPORTS
September 27, 1991 | CHRIS BAKER
Quarterback Jay Schroeder said the Raiders' scoring slump can't be blamed on injuries to the offensive line. "It's a combination of things," Schroeder said. "It's not just one specific thing. You can't pin it on one group. You just can't. If you're being honest after watching the films, it's everybody, and everybody has got to get better at what they do." The Raider offense has been inconsistent this season. "One series you look great and the next series it just blows up," Schroeder said.
SPORTS
January 8, 1990 | MIKE DOWNEY
Can somebody beat these people? Can anybody? The Rams? Broncos? Browns? "Let me tell you what it's going to take," said a nine-year NFL man, nose tackle Jim Burt, speaking on behalf of his new bosses and teammates, the San Francisco 49ers, on whose side he has been for only a matter of weeks. "Whoever's going to beat the 49ers has one chance, and one chance only," Burt said, "and that's to fight. They're going to have to fight.
SPORTS
January 29, 1990 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
When the New York Giants won the 1987 Super Bowl in Pasadena, the Denver Broncos were the victims, and Jim Burt was the subject of postgame television focus in an emotional hugging celebration with his son, Jimmy, age 5. When the San Francisco 49ers won the 1990 Super Bowl on Sunday in New Orleans, the Denver Broncos were the victims, and Jim Burt was the subject of postgame television focus in an emotional hugging celebration with his son, Jimmy, age 8.
SPORTS
September 9, 1987 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Let's see, don't we have a form around here for these things? Oh yeah, here it is: "(Dateline)--Eight months after their moment of glory in Super Bowl ------, there are disquieting developments in the camp of the world champion ------. "The team's star, ------, has written a tell-all book which even makes embarrassing disclosures about his coach, ------. The coach has written his own book, candidly acknowledging his long-running differences with ------ upper management, specifically ------.
SPORTS
January 8, 1990 | MIKE DOWNEY
Can somebody beat these people? Can anybody? The Rams? Broncos? Browns? "Let me tell you what it's going to take," said a nine-year NFL man, nose tackle Jim Burt, speaking on behalf of his new bosses and teammates, the San Francisco 49ers, on whose side he has been for only a matter of weeks. "Whoever's going to beat the 49ers has one chance, and one chance only," Burt said, "and that's to fight. They're going to have to fight.
SPORTS
November 1, 1989 | From Times wire services
The San Francisco 49ers today signed former New York Giants nose tackle Jim Burt to fill the void created when Michael Carter went down with a right foot injury in Sunday's 23-10 victory over the Jets. Burt, who played with the Giants through the 1988 season, is best known by 49er fans as the player who put Joe Montana in the hospital during the 1986 NFC Championship game at the Meadowlands. Burt, 30, who has a history of back problems, retired under pressure from the Giants in the off-season.
SPORTS
July 22, 1989 | Associated Press
Jim Burt, the starting nose tackle on the New York Giants' Super Bowl-winning team three years ago, announced his retirement Friday night. General Manager George Young said Burt, an eight-year veteran who has been plagued by back problems for much of his career, told team officials he made his decision Thursday. The Giants open training camp next week. "He's been a wonderful player for us and it's very difficult when players who have put so much into it realize it's his time," Young said.
SPORTS
March 28, 1989 | From Times wire services
Jim Burt, an eight-year veteran and a member of the New York Giants' 1986 Super Bowl champions, has turned down a $950,000 contract offer from the Green Bay Packers and will remain with New York, according to a published report. "Money wasn't the thing," Burt told the New York Times. "I want to stay in the area. I have great rapport with the fans. . . . When you see respect there, you know the grass isn't greener on the other side.
SPORTS
September 9, 1987 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Let's see, don't we have a form around here for these things? Oh yeah, here it is: "(Dateline)--Eight months after their moment of glory in Super Bowl ------, there are disquieting developments in the camp of the world champion ------. "The team's star, ------, has written a tell-all book which even makes embarrassing disclosures about his coach, ------. The coach has written his own book, candidly acknowledging his long-running differences with ------ upper management, specifically ------.
SPORTS
March 15, 1987 | United Press International
The New York Giants battled the image of the Chicago Bears throughout the 1986 NFL season, finally creating their own identity with a victory in Super Bowl XXI. Now the Giants must fight the memory of the Bears' off-season exploits in an attempt to turn their gridiron success into dollars. Playing in the New York area is a natural boost for the Giants' earning power, but their strategy is different from the Bears' saturation of the market a year ago.
SPORTS
March 15, 1987 | United Press International
The New York Giants battled the image of the Chicago Bears throughout the 1986 NFL season, finally creating their own identity with a victory in Super Bowl XXI. Now the Giants must fight the memory of the Bears' off-season exploits in an attempt to turn their gridiron success into dollars. Playing in the New York area is a natural boost for the Giants' earning power, but their strategy is different from the Bears' saturation of the market a year ago.
NEWS
January 26, 1987 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, Times Staff Writer
It's funny, but until Sunday, Phil Simms was never just Phil Simms. People couldn't spit out his name without hanging a qualifier on it. You may remember him as "that damned Phil Simms" and "Phil he's-OK-for-now Simms." For eight seasons as the New York Giants' quarterback, it's been Phil Simms and a mouthful of ifs, ands and buts. And what was so different about the week leading to the Super Bowl, when we learned that Simms was not as tall or as swift or as strong as Denver's John Elway?
NEWS
January 26, 1987 | RANDY HARVEY, From Staff and Wire Reports
New York nose tackle Jim Burt has been known to go into the stands after games to celebrate with fans. But in this game, he had one of the fans come to him. He had his wife bring his 4-year-old son, Jimmy, to him on the sidelines in the fourth quarter. "We had the game won with about four minutes to play," Burt said. "I wanted him on the field with me. He's my pride and joy."
NEWS
January 26, 1987 | CHRIS DUFRESNE, Times Staff Writer
It's funny, but until Sunday, Phil Simms was never just Phil Simms. People couldn't spit out his name without hanging a qualifier on it. You may remember him as "that damned Phil Simms" and "Phil he's-OK-for-now Simms." For eight seasons as the New York Giants' quarterback, it's been Phil Simms and a mouthful of ifs, ands and buts. And what was so different about the week leading to the Super Bowl, when we learned that Simms was not as tall or as swift or as strong as Denver's John Elway?
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