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Jim Calvin

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SPORTS
December 12, 1990 | MIKE DOWNEY
When the Iraqi soldier stuck the machine gun under his chin, when his terrified wife wept, envisioning the horror of impending death or rape, when they hid together and discussed drowning their three beloved dogs out of fear that their barking might reveal their whereabouts to the soldiers, Jim Calvin believed that somehow they would get out of Kuwait alive.
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SPORTS
December 12, 1990 | MIKE DOWNEY
When the Iraqi soldier stuck the machine gun under his chin, when his terrified wife wept, envisioning the horror of impending death or rape, when they hid together and discussed drowning their three beloved dogs out of fear that their barking might reveal their whereabouts to the soldiers, Jim Calvin believed that somehow they would get out of Kuwait alive.
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NEWS
June 20, 1985 | LOUIS SAHAGUN and MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writers
"Where's my fly swatter?" chortled 84-year-old bar owner Effie Schaad, while hundreds of the insects roamed over the walls, floors, chairs and customers of her establishment. Behind thick lenses, her eyes searched the shelves in back of the bar, which held, among other things, a rattlesnake rattle, snapshots of a dog with a rat in its mouth and a stuffed alligator with its left front foot missing.
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | PENELOPE McMILLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By the time Iraqi troops overran Kuwait in the early hours of Aug. 2, Jim Calvin had been the coach of the Kuwaiti national basketball team for 1 1/2 years and was living in Kuwait city with his wife, Phyllis, and their three poodles. Calvin, 50, was walking the dogs at 4:30 a.m. Thursday--"It's bright sunshine in Kuwait at that hour"--when he saw transport trucks clattering past his apartment building on the main highway between Iraq and Kuwait.
NEWS
June 30, 1985 | JODY JACOBS
All the hoopla, hustle and excitement of the circus under a Big Top. That's what Betty and Alan Levenson plan to re-create on the spacious grounds of their South Pasadena estate next month. They'll have a real midway with all its games of chance. There will be clowns, cutting up in classic clown tradition. Machines will pop corn and spin out cotton candy. But so as not to scare anyone, the 46-foot-long tigers will be made of flowers. Naturally, there's going to be a carrousel.
SPORTS
August 11, 1991
It was a year ago that professional golf had to deal with one of its biggest controversies: Shoal Creek. The Birmingham, Ala., club had exclusionary practices whereby blacks were not allowed to join. There were talks of boycotts. Boardrooms of private clubs across the country were interested in what the outcome would be. Finally, Shoal Creek acquiesced and admitted a black member to its all-white club.
SPORTS
October 20, 1986 | SCOTT OSTLER
One last look back. Disjointed notes from a memorably disjointed Angels-Red Sox series . . . Scene: After Game 7, in a corner of the Red Sox clubhouse, winning pitcher Roger Clemens slumps on a stool, pale and sickly, barely able to speak, barely able to move. He is answering reporters' questions in a weak whisper. Going into the game, Clemens is the prime candidate for Choking Dog of the Decade Award in Boston. After his big regular season, he twice fails to beat the Angels.
SPORTS
November 22, 1987
The PGA has moved its cutoff on the money list for qualifying down a couple of notches to 127, but there are still several interesting names below the line. In theory, that means most of the golfers below 127 on the money-winning list would have to qualify to play in next year's PGA tournaments, but that's not always the case.
MAGAZINE
June 3, 1990 | PETER S. GREENBERG, Peter S. Greenberg is a television producer who writes the Savvy Traveler column in The Times' Travel section.
AS THE HOMETOWN basketball team trots, then runs down the hardwood floor, the crowd begins to cheer. "Pass! Pass!" the coach yells. "That's it . . . Now dribble! Dribble! . . . Defend your position!" One of his players steps in front of another. "That's it . . . Screen! Screen!" the coach shouts, this time gesturing wildly. "OK, he's open. Take it! Take it!" Swish. Two points.
SPORTS
February 13, 2005 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
As he walked through the airport in Atlanta on his way to catch a flight to Jacksonville, Fla., to see the Super Bowl, Charlie Sifford was stopped in his tracks by a man who stared at him for a few moments. "You play golf?" Sifford said he did. "You Charlie Sifford?" Sifford said he was. "I thought that was you. Where's your cigar?" That happens all the time, Sifford said, people figuring out who he is and asking about his trademark cigar. Sure, the cigar.
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