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Jim Catfish Hunter

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August 11, 1999 | From Associated Press
Baseball Hall of Famer Jim "Catfish" Hunter was unconscious and in critical condition in a neuro-intensive care unit after falling and hitting his head, a hospital spokesman said Tuesday. Hunter, 53, who suffers from amyothropic lateral sclerosis--an irreversible deterioration of the muscles--fell Sunday while negotiating cement steps outside his home in Hertford, a friend said. "We just need everybody to keep him in your prayers," Hunter's wife, Helen, said Tuesday.
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September 13, 1999 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jim "Catfish" Hunter probably would have despised this--people dressed in suits making a fuss over him. He was buried Sunday in Hertford, N.C., several hundred yards from the high school field where he began a baseball career that would send him to the Hall of Fame. More than 1,000 family, friends and former major league teammates turned out for the funeral of the pitcher who won five World Series titles with the Oakland Athletics and New York Yankees.
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SPORTS
September 10, 1999 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim "Catfish" Hunter, whose pitching prowess earned him five World Series rings, 224 victories, a spot in the baseball Hall of Fame and made him the game's first big-money free agent, died at his home Thursday after battling Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 53. Hunter, like his father a farmer in Hertford, N.C., learned in September 1998 that he had amyothropic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, the disease named after another New York Yankee who died of it in 1941.
SPORTS
September 10, 1999 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim "Catfish" Hunter, whose pitching prowess earned him five World Series rings, 224 victories, a spot in the baseball Hall of Fame and made him the game's first big-money free agent, died at his home Thursday after battling Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 53. Hunter, like his father a farmer in Hertford, N.C., learned in September 1998 that he had amyothropic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, the disease named after another New York Yankee who died of it in 1941.
SPORTS
September 13, 1999 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jim "Catfish" Hunter probably would have despised this--people dressed in suits making a fuss over him. He was buried Sunday in Hertford, N.C., several hundred yards from the high school field where he began a baseball career that would send him to the Hall of Fame. More than 1,000 family, friends and former major league teammates turned out for the funeral of the pitcher who won five World Series titles with the Oakland Athletics and New York Yankees.
SPORTS
November 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
Hall of Fame pitcher Catfish Hunter is in Johns Hopkins Medical Center in Baltimore for tests after experiencing difficulties with motor skills. There are fears that Hunter may have Lou Gehrig's disease, amytrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive, ultimately fatal neurological condition, the New York Daily News reported Saturday. Gehrig died from the disease in 1941 at age 39. "I've got no strength in my arms and my hands," Hunter told the News.
SPORTS
March 14, 1999 | From Associated Press
A boy scampers up the stadium steps, paper and pen in outstretched hands, toward George Steinbrenner's box at Legends Field where Catfish Hunter and his wife sit alone an hour before the game. "Mr. Hunter," the boy asks, eagerly holding up his pad. "I'm sorry," Catfish says, a penetrating sorrow in his blue eyes. "I can't sign anymore." Lou Gehrig's disease is breaking down Jim "Catfish" Hunter's body, muscle by muscle.
SPORTS
July 10, 1989
The longest All-Star game took place in a one-year old park, Anaheim Stadium, July 11, 1967 before 46,309 fans. The 15-inning affair, won by the National League, 2-1, ended after three hours and 41 minutes. HIGHLIGHTS: Cincinnati's Tony Perez hits a one-strike fastball off Kansas City's Jim "Catfish" Hunter for the winning run. Boston's Carl Yastrzemski was 3-for-4. There was a total of 30 strikeouts. Chicago Cub pitcher Ferguson Jenkins led the way with six strikeouts.
SPORTS
August 11, 1999 | From Associated Press
Baseball Hall of Famer Jim "Catfish" Hunter was unconscious and in critical condition in a neuro-intensive care unit after falling and hitting his head, a hospital spokesman said Tuesday. Hunter, 53, who suffers from amyothropic lateral sclerosis--an irreversible deterioration of the muscles--fell Sunday while negotiating cement steps outside his home in Hertford, a friend said. "We just need everybody to keep him in your prayers," Hunter's wife, Helen, said Tuesday.
SPORTS
March 14, 1999 | From Associated Press
A boy scampers up the stadium steps, paper and pen in outstretched hands, toward George Steinbrenner's box at Legends Field where Catfish Hunter and his wife sit alone an hour before the game. "Mr. Hunter," the boy asks, eagerly holding up his pad. "I'm sorry," Catfish says, a penetrating sorrow in his blue eyes. "I can't sign anymore." Lou Gehrig's disease is breaking down Jim "Catfish" Hunter's body, muscle by muscle.
SPORTS
November 8, 1998 | From Associated Press
Hall of Fame pitcher Catfish Hunter is in Johns Hopkins Medical Center in Baltimore for tests after experiencing difficulties with motor skills. There are fears that Hunter may have Lou Gehrig's disease, amytrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive, ultimately fatal neurological condition, the New York Daily News reported Saturday. Gehrig died from the disease in 1941 at age 39. "I've got no strength in my arms and my hands," Hunter told the News.
SPORTS
December 15, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Big Jess Willard, once the most famous athlete in America and the world heavyweight boxing champion between the eras of Jack Johnson and Jack Dempsey, died 31 years ago today. Willard was a true-to-life Oklahoma cowboy when he began a years-long quest to wrest the heavyweight championship from Jack Johnson, the widely hated black champion who had so easily beaten popular ex-champion Jim Jeffries in 1910. "I never had a glove on until I was 28," he said, years later.
SPORTS
August 14, 1999 | Associated Press
Philadelphia placed pitcher Curt Schilling on the 15-day disabled list Friday after he again had problems with his shoulder when he tried to throw. The loss is a blow to the Phillies, who are third in line for a National League wild-card playoff berth but will have to make a run without their top starter. The move was retroactive to Aug. 8, so Schilling will be eligible to be activated on Aug. 23.
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