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Jim Caviezel

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2011 | By Steve Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
On a sunny summer afternoon in downtown Manhattan, several uniformed cops are nervously pacing outside a police station. Inside, a hostage situation is brewing. A sinister-looking man hovers in the corner while a police officer lies on the ground. Across the hall, a tall man with a ski mask threatens two detectives. Scared and confused, the officer on the floor reaches for his revolver and squeezes off a round. Then the director yells cut. The incidents aren't part of a New York City crime scene; instead, they represent key moments in an episode of the CBS thriller "Person of Interest," which offers a dark and conspiracy-minded view of the country's biggest metropolis.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The folks who brought you the After Dark Horrorfest - a collection of eight scary movies playing as a collective - turn their sights to the gritty no-nonsense action picture with five films bundled under the banner "After Dark Action. " The movies aren't connected in any way except that they're being released together, yet taken as a whole, patterns do emerge - mysterious strangers new to town, bags of mislaid cash, the unexpected cameo by a slightly tarnished star, punches thrown, shots fired and feisty, capable women dressed in tank tops relegated to supporting roles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The folks who brought you the After Dark Horrorfest - a collection of eight scary movies playing as a collective - turn their sights to the gritty no-nonsense action picture with five films bundled under the banner "After Dark Action. " The movies aren't connected in any way except that they're being released together, yet taken as a whole, patterns do emerge - mysterious strangers new to town, bags of mislaid cash, the unexpected cameo by a slightly tarnished star, punches thrown, shots fired and feisty, capable women dressed in tank tops relegated to supporting roles.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2011 | By Steve Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
On a sunny summer afternoon in downtown Manhattan, several uniformed cops are nervously pacing outside a police station. Inside, a hostage situation is brewing. A sinister-looking man hovers in the corner while a police officer lies on the ground. Across the hall, a tall man with a ski mask threatens two detectives. Scared and confused, the officer on the floor reaches for his revolver and squeezes off a round. Then the director yells cut. The incidents aren't part of a New York City crime scene; instead, they represent key moments in an episode of the CBS thriller "Person of Interest," which offers a dark and conspiracy-minded view of the country's biggest metropolis.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
If you don't include (and there is no reason you should) 1948's "The Countess of Monte Cristo," starring celebrated skater Sonja Henie, at least five filmed versions of Alexandre Dumas' "The Count of Monte Cristo" predate the current one. Too bad they didn't leave well enough alone. It's obvious, of course, why they didn't. Dumas' enormous novel, so big it's often read in abridged form, has a revenge-with-a-capital-R plot that's overwhelming.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2004 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
All Jim Caviezel wanted to do was a comedy. In his beginnings as a starving thespian in Seattle, at least one casting agent agreed with him by telling him he didn't have the chops to be a dramatic actor. But fate would have it a different way. More than a decade after his debut in a Seattle dinner theater performance of Neil Simon's "Come Blow Your Horn," the 35-year-old actor is playing one of the most dramatic characters an actor could ask for: Jesus Christ.
NEWS
February 7, 2002
* The five top-grossing movies at the weekend box office: 1. "Black Hawk Down"; 2. "Snow Dogs"; 3. "A Walk to Remember"; 4. "The Count of Monte Cristo," with James Frain, above left, Helen McCrory and, in the title role, Jim Caviezel; 5. "A Beautiful Mind."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2002
Critics weren't impressed by the latest reworking of Alexandre Dumas' classic novel, but the revenge plot still makes "The Count of Monte Cristo" fun to watch. It arrives on video today, with Jim Caviezel, left, as the sailor who is wrongly imprisoned, escapes and schemes for a proper payback.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2004
Sneak peek: MTV won't say what films will be parodied at the taping of its annual Movie Awards show on Saturday, but among those scheduled to appear in them are Will Ferrell, Jim Caviezel, Lindsay Lohan, Rebecca Romijn, Burt Reynolds and Jamie Lee Curtis. The show will air June 10. * New gig: The Rev. Al Sharpton will serve as a commentator for CNBC during the two major political conventions this summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2008 | From a Times Staff Writer
The classic cult TV series "The Prisoner" is going to be remade for AMC, with Jim Caviezel starring as Number Six, the character played in the original by Patrick McGoohan. Ian McKellen will costar. The original series, which premiered on CBS in 1968, ran only 17 episodes but has retained fascination for many TV fans over the years because of its sense of mystery. Number Six was a political prisoner in a lovely village, but his captors were rarely seen and he was never certain what it was they wanted from him. Other residents were equally enigmatic.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2004 | Lorenza Munoz, Times Staff Writer
All Jim Caviezel wanted to do was a comedy. In his beginnings as a starving thespian in Seattle, at least one casting agent agreed with him by telling him he didn't have the chops to be a dramatic actor. But fate would have it a different way. More than a decade after his debut in a Seattle dinner theater performance of Neil Simon's "Come Blow Your Horn," the 35-year-old actor is playing one of the most dramatic characters an actor could ask for: Jesus Christ.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
If you don't include (and there is no reason you should) 1948's "The Countess of Monte Cristo," starring celebrated skater Sonja Henie, at least five filmed versions of Alexandre Dumas' "The Count of Monte Cristo" predate the current one. Too bad they didn't leave well enough alone. It's obvious, of course, why they didn't. Dumas' enormous novel, so big it's often read in abridged form, has a revenge-with-a-capital-R plot that's overwhelming.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2004 | From Associated Press
Censors have approved Mel Gibson's controversial movie "The Passion of the Christ" for screening in Malaysia, but the government says only Christians should watch it and only specially designated cinemas can show it. The film -- which stars Jim Caviezel as Christ and was a huge hit in the United States -- was widely expected to be banned in Malaysia, a multiethnic but predominantly Muslim country that often restricts movies about religion and other sensitive topics.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By Times staff writers
"The Ten Commandments" (1956) The classic Charlton Heston epic grossed $65 million in theaters. In today's dollars, that equals nearly $1.1 billion, making it the sixth-highest-grossing movie ever. (Unadjusted domestic gross: $65 million; adjusted: $1.09 billion) "Ben-Hur" (1959) Another New Testament Heston epic, "Ben-Hur" won 11 Academy Awards, including best picture, and was a big commercial success for MGM. Going by inflation-adjusted numbers, it's the 13th-highest-grossing film ever.
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