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Jim Clark

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2001
I was deeply saddened to hear of the brutal killing of Jim Clark. I didn't know his name, but I recognized him from the photograph as the person who through the years at Surfers Point had occasionally come up to the window of my truck asking for change as I checked the surf. At first I put him off, but later I gave in and gave him a few dollars in quarters I kept in my ashtray for parking money. I was impressed by how well he took care of himself under the circumstances he placed himself in and how much of a gentleman he was when I told him I had no money.
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BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Adam Jones
Animation giant Pixar uses technology only as a means to an end; its films are rooted in human concerns, not computer wizardry. The same can be said of the new book "Creativity, Inc.," Ed Catmull's endearingly thoughtful explanation of how the studio he co-founded generated hits such as the "Toy Story" trilogy, "Up" and "Wall-E. " Catmull was a 1970s computer animation pioneer (university classmates included Netscape co-founder Jim Clark), but his book is not a technical history of how the hand-drawn artistry perfected by Disney was rendered obsolete by the processing power of machines.
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BUSINESS
April 8, 2000 | From Reuters
Silicon Valley entrepreneur Jim Clark on Friday said he would pump more money into his "new new thing"--Healtheon/WebMD Corp.--prompting a surge in the share price of the beleaguered Internet-based health services network. Clark, the billionaire who was profiled in Michael Lewis' recent book "The New New Thing," will buy up to $220 million of the company's stock with fellow Healtheon director John Doerr.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The former chief of staff for ex-Gov. Frank Murkowski pleaded guilty to fraud in an ongoing corruption probe. Jim Clark apologized for concealing more than $68,000 in Murkowski campaign expenses that were paid for by an oilfield services company. According to Clark's plea agreement, filed in U.S. District Court in Anchorage, he could be sentenced to nearly four years in prison, plus three years' supervised release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jim Clark, a former Alabama sheriff whose violent confrontations with voting rights marchers in Selma shocked the nation in 1965 and gave momentum to the civil rights movement, has died. He was 84. Clark died Monday at an Elba, Ala., nursing home after years of declining health, according to Hayes Funeral Home officials in Elba. "He's recognized as a symbol of opposition, not only in Selma, but throughout the nation," U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2001 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Wealthy technology guru Jim Clark has stopped payment on $60 million of a $150-million pledge to Stanford University for biomedical science, citing anger over President Bush's restrictions on stem cell research. The decision by Clark, founder of Silicon Graphics, Netscape, Healtheon and myCFO, is highly unusual in higher education philanthropy. In recent years, donors have pulled gifts out of anger with recipient universities. Some have canceled donations when their investments have gone sour.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
The former chief of staff for ex-Gov. Frank Murkowski pleaded guilty to fraud in an ongoing corruption probe. Jim Clark apologized for concealing more than $68,000 in Murkowski campaign expenses that were paid for by an oilfield services company. According to Clark's plea agreement, filed in U.S. District Court in Anchorage, he could be sentenced to nearly four years in prison, plus three years' supervised release.
MAGAZINE
April 18, 1999
The uniqueness of the bathroom sinks you featured in "Back to Basins" (by Barbara Thornburg, SoCal Style, March 14) can't compare to the uniqueness of the individuals (or families) who use them. What a time- and money-saving life they must lead, not using soap or washcloths and not brushing their teeth. While cleanliness may be next to godliness, it appears it's nowhere near Zen. Jim Clark Long Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1991
Re Peter Rainer's Feb. 24 commentary on "L.A. movies": In most movies, Southern California is just a place to put action. Films such as "Colors," "Lethal Weapon" and "Down and Out in Beverly Hills" all looked like L.A. but they didn't feel like L.A. The fact is that only a handful of films, such as Henry Jaglom's "Always" and Robert Dornhelm's "Echo Park," remind me of the L.A. I know--where most of the characters are oddball...
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Adam Jones
Animation giant Pixar uses technology only as a means to an end; its films are rooted in human concerns, not computer wizardry. The same can be said of the new book "Creativity, Inc.," Ed Catmull's endearingly thoughtful explanation of how the studio he co-founded generated hits such as the "Toy Story" trilogy, "Up" and "Wall-E. " Catmull was a 1970s computer animation pioneer (university classmates included Netscape co-founder Jim Clark), but his book is not a technical history of how the hand-drawn artistry perfected by Disney was rendered obsolete by the processing power of machines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jim Clark, a former Alabama sheriff whose violent confrontations with voting rights marchers in Selma shocked the nation in 1965 and gave momentum to the civil rights movement, has died. He was 84. Clark died Monday at an Elba, Ala., nursing home after years of declining health, according to Hayes Funeral Home officials in Elba. "He's recognized as a symbol of opposition, not only in Selma, but throughout the nation," U.S. Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.
NEWS
May 19, 2005
I hate to think about the movie viewing future for "fashionably late" Christie D'Zurilla ["Trouble for the Tardy," May 12]. Eventually she will join the ranks of all those elderly folks who habitually arrive late for matinee showings. Seems they either don't own a watch, never look up show times, or just have such a hectic retirement life that they simply cannot get there before the lights go down. Instead of printing "show times" and "feature times," Loews should print "senior seating times" about 15 minutes before the actual "show time."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2001 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Wealthy technology guru Jim Clark has stopped payment on $60 million of a $150-million pledge to Stanford University for biomedical science, citing anger over President Bush's restrictions on stem cell research. The decision by Clark, founder of Silicon Graphics, Netscape, Healtheon and myCFO, is highly unusual in higher education philanthropy. In recent years, donors have pulled gifts out of anger with recipient universities. Some have canceled donations when their investments have gone sour.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2001
I was deeply saddened to hear of the brutal killing of Jim Clark. I didn't know his name, but I recognized him from the photograph as the person who through the years at Surfers Point had occasionally come up to the window of my truck asking for change as I checked the surf. At first I put him off, but later I gave in and gave him a few dollars in quarters I kept in my ashtray for parking money. I was impressed by how well he took care of himself under the circumstances he placed himself in and how much of a gentleman he was when I told him I had no money.
BUSINESS
April 8, 2000 | From Reuters
Silicon Valley entrepreneur Jim Clark on Friday said he would pump more money into his "new new thing"--Healtheon/WebMD Corp.--prompting a surge in the share price of the beleaguered Internet-based health services network. Clark, the billionaire who was profiled in Michael Lewis' recent book "The New New Thing," will buy up to $220 million of the company's stock with fellow Healtheon director John Doerr.
NEWS
October 27, 1999 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Saying that he felt terribly indebted to Stanford for helping him become fabulously rich in the Silicon Valley, Netscape co-founder Jim Clark said Tuesday that he will donate $150 million to propel the university into the next high-tech revolution: biomedical engineering. The gift, the largest monetary donation in Stanford's history and fifth-largest to any American university, is designed to jump-start the Palo Alto campus in the biomedical race with other major universities.
NEWS
May 19, 2005
I hate to think about the movie viewing future for "fashionably late" Christie D'Zurilla ["Trouble for the Tardy," May 12]. Eventually she will join the ranks of all those elderly folks who habitually arrive late for matinee showings. Seems they either don't own a watch, never look up show times, or just have such a hectic retirement life that they simply cannot get there before the lights go down. Instead of printing "show times" and "feature times," Loews should print "senior seating times" about 15 minutes before the actual "show time."
SPORTS
March 29, 1986
It was a day I had long ago marked on my calender . . . Angel tickets were to go on sale to the general public at Anaheim Stadium. And what do I find? That the Angel organization had graciously blocked off (as in off-limits) all seats, on all levels, between short right field and short left field. I drove 40 miles like a good early bird to sit in the outfield. The Angels' excuse? That all of the seats were already "spoken for." Poppycock! We are talking about some 30,000 seats.
MAGAZINE
April 18, 1999
The uniqueness of the bathroom sinks you featured in "Back to Basins" (by Barbara Thornburg, SoCal Style, March 14) can't compare to the uniqueness of the individuals (or families) who use them. What a time- and money-saving life they must lead, not using soap or washcloths and not brushing their teeth. While cleanliness may be next to godliness, it appears it's nowhere near Zen. Jim Clark Long Beach
BUSINESS
March 5, 1996 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Clark, the onetime Stanford professor whose launch of 3-D computer maker Silicon Graphics and Internet phenom Netscape Communications have already made him one of the most successful high-tech entrepreneurs ever, is launching another new venture--an online health-care service called Healthscape. Clark and the elite venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, which also funded Netscape, have invested a total of $5 million in the new venture.
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