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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1996 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For KOCE-TV newsman Jim Cooper, it wasn't such a big deal that he used to try to scoop a young reporter named Dan Rather when they both covered then-President Richard M. Nixon in San Clemente. And he won't even mention--unless prompted--that he reported live for CBS News on Sen. Robert F. Kennedy's assassination in Los Angeles in 1968.
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OPINION
October 12, 2003
Should KOCE-TV, Orange County's public television station -- the only local television media voice for its 3 million residents -- be sold? By any measure of sound judgment and long-range consideration, the answer should be a resounding no. Here's what the Coast Community College District stands to gain from the sale: It would eliminate the $1.8 million it contributes each year toward the $7.8-million operating budget of KOCE. (The other $6 million in funds to operate comes from memberships, program underwriting, grants, the Corp.
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NEWS
February 4, 1994 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They would seem an unlikely pair to have emerged, for the moment at least, as the chief threat to President Clinton's health care reform plan. One is a relatively junior--and largely unknown--Tennessee Democrat who aspires to the Senate seat once held by Vice President Al Gore. The other, though rapidly becoming an accomplished legislator, is best known to the nation as a character in a television sitcom who bumbled around the deck of a cruise ship in short pants and knee socks. Reps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1996 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For KOCE-TV newsman Jim Cooper, it wasn't such a big deal that he used to try to scoop a young reporter named Dan Rather when they both covered then-President Richard M. Nixon in San Clemente. And he won't even mention--unless prompted--that he reported live for CBS News on Sen. Robert F. Kennedy's assassination in Los Angeles in 1968.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1989 | STEVEN R. CHURM, Times Staff Writer
Jim Cooper defied the TV odds. In a business in which success means making it to a second season, Cooper's weekly public affairs program was aired on Orange County's KOCE-TV for nearly 17 years. It won two Los Angeles-area Emmys and for years was the only TV news program dedicated entirely to exploring Orange County issues. But "Jim Cooper's Orange County" is no more. Ending the show was a mutual decision by Cooper and station officials at KOCE, Channel 50.
NEWS
February 6, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Seeking to add to the momentum behind his model for health care reform, Rep. Jim Cooper (D-Tenn.) on Saturday told followers of Ross Perot that his plan will offer nearly as many benefits as President Clinton's proposal, but with less cost and with less bureaucratic control. He also called his proposal "the best starting point to achieve national consensus on this complex issue."
OPINION
October 12, 2003
Should KOCE-TV, Orange County's public television station -- the only local television media voice for its 3 million residents -- be sold? By any measure of sound judgment and long-range consideration, the answer should be a resounding no. Here's what the Coast Community College District stands to gain from the sale: It would eliminate the $1.8 million it contributes each year toward the $7.8-million operating budget of KOCE. (The other $6 million in funds to operate comes from memberships, program underwriting, grants, the Corp.
NEWS
February 7, 1994 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Propelled into the spotlight by powerful interest groups, Rep. Jim Cooper's formula for national health care reform is now being hailed as the leading alternative to President Clinton's proposal for improving the way Americans receive medical treatment. Proponents praise it as the sensible middle ground between radical tinkering and doing nothing.
NEWS
August 15, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Stan Cavness made a beeline for Rep. Jim Cooper as soon as the Tennessee Democrat arrived at an anti-violence "youth summit" that drew hundreds of young people to the local community college this weekend. Cavness, a captain in the Dyersburg Police Department, had only one thing on his mind: the stunning vote in the House of Representatives on Thursday to derail the $33-billion crime bill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1987
Ethically, I'm not sure I can solicit funds for a cause, no matter how worthy. But I do think it's appropriate for me to suggest that others solicit funds for a worthy cause. A most worthy cause is "Jim Cooper's Orange County," that most interesting and stimulating weekly program, hosted on public television station KOCE (Channel 50) by Cooper. According to Chancellor David A. Brownell of Coast Community College District, decreased funding and a redirection of KOCE's mission to emphasize support of district instructional programs has led to the decision to drop Cooper's program.
NEWS
August 15, 1994 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Stan Cavness made a beeline for Rep. Jim Cooper as soon as the Tennessee Democrat arrived at an anti-violence "youth summit" that drew hundreds of young people to the local community college this weekend. Cavness, a captain in the Dyersburg Police Department, had only one thing on his mind: the stunning vote in the House of Representatives on Thursday to derail the $33-billion crime bill.
NEWS
February 7, 1994 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Propelled into the spotlight by powerful interest groups, Rep. Jim Cooper's formula for national health care reform is now being hailed as the leading alternative to President Clinton's proposal for improving the way Americans receive medical treatment. Proponents praise it as the sensible middle ground between radical tinkering and doing nothing.
NEWS
February 6, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Seeking to add to the momentum behind his model for health care reform, Rep. Jim Cooper (D-Tenn.) on Saturday told followers of Ross Perot that his plan will offer nearly as many benefits as President Clinton's proposal, but with less cost and with less bureaucratic control. He also called his proposal "the best starting point to achieve national consensus on this complex issue."
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They would seem an unlikely pair to have emerged, for the moment at least, as the chief threat to President Clinton's health care reform plan. One is a relatively junior--and largely unknown--Tennessee Democrat who aspires to the Senate seat once held by Vice President Al Gore. The other, though rapidly becoming an accomplished legislator, is best known to the nation as a character in a television sitcom who bumbled around the deck of a cruise ship in short pants and knee socks. Reps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1989 | STEVEN R. CHURM, Times Staff Writer
Jim Cooper defied the TV odds. In a business in which success means making it to a second season, Cooper's weekly public affairs program was aired on Orange County's KOCE-TV for nearly 17 years. It won two Los Angeles-area Emmys and for years was the only TV news program dedicated entirely to exploring Orange County issues. But "Jim Cooper's Orange County" is no more. Ending the show was a mutual decision by Cooper and station officials at KOCE, Channel 50.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1987
The first of five new episodes of "Jim Cooper's Orange County" for the 1987-88 season will be broadcast tonight at 8:30 on KOCE-TV Channel 50. Since Cooper raised $106,000 in private donations, his weekly public-affairs series has been assured of at least a 24-week season, station officials said. KOCE has said it is unable to provide underwriting for the show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1987
The first of five new episodes of "Jim Cooper's Orange County" for the 1987-88 season will be broadcast tonight at 8:30 on KOCE-TV Channel 50. Since Cooper raised $106,000 in private donations, his weekly public-affairs series has been assured of at least a 24-week season, station officials said. KOCE has said it is unable to provide underwriting for the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1987 | HERMAN WONG, Times Staff Writer
KOCE-TV's only regular public affairs program, "Jim Cooper's Orange County," may be canceled as a weekly series next season, officials at the Huntington Beach-based public station said. Station President William Furniss said: "We simply don't have the money. We're looking at the options now, maybe to keep his show on a sporadic basis or maybe to have Jim do more specials instead." He expects to make a final decision in the next several weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1987
Ethically, I'm not sure I can solicit funds for a cause, no matter how worthy. But I do think it's appropriate for me to suggest that others solicit funds for a worthy cause. A most worthy cause is "Jim Cooper's Orange County," that most interesting and stimulating weekly program, hosted on public television station KOCE (Channel 50) by Cooper. According to Chancellor David A. Brownell of Coast Community College District, decreased funding and a redirection of KOCE's mission to emphasize support of district instructional programs has led to the decision to drop Cooper's program.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1987 | HERMAN WONG, Times Staff Writer
KOCE-TV's only regular public affairs program, "Jim Cooper's Orange County," may be canceled as a weekly series next season, officials at the Huntington Beach-based public station said. Station President William Furniss said: "We simply don't have the money. We're looking at the options now, maybe to keep his show on a sporadic basis or maybe to have Jim do more specials instead." He expects to make a final decision in the next several weeks.
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