Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJim Crace
IN THE NEWS

Jim Crace

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2010 | By Richard Eder
All That Follows A Novel Jim Crace Nan A. Talese / Doubleday: 230 pp., $25.95 British novelist Jim Crace has written in "Gift of Stones" about a Stone Age community that senses its doom when a Bronze Age tribe settles nearby. He has written in "Quarantine" of a young and annoying Jesus spending his 40 desert days among craggy cave-dwelling neighbors. In "Being Dead" he has written of the life in and around the decaying bodies of a murdered husband and wife. In an odd way, each of those novels is a masterpiece.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Harvest A Novel Jim Crace Nan A. Talese/Doubleday: 208 pp., $24.95 Jim Crace has always been something of a literary outlier. His novels can appear apocalyptic, but really, he's a humanist at heart, interested in the way that people - complex, contradictory, sometimes working against their own best interests - navigate the territory of a complex, and often menacing, universe. The magnificent "Quarantine" (1997), perhaps his best-known effort, re-imagines Jesus' 40 days in the desert, not as morality tale or parable but as a human story, in which Christ is most remarkable for having been, simply, a man. His follow-up, the National Book Critics Circle Award-winning "Being Dead" (1999)
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Harvest A Novel Jim Crace Nan A. Talese/Doubleday: 208 pp., $24.95 Jim Crace has always been something of a literary outlier. His novels can appear apocalyptic, but really, he's a humanist at heart, interested in the way that people - complex, contradictory, sometimes working against their own best interests - navigate the territory of a complex, and often menacing, universe. The magnificent "Quarantine" (1997), perhaps his best-known effort, re-imagines Jesus' 40 days in the desert, not as morality tale or parable but as a human story, in which Christ is most remarkable for having been, simply, a man. His follow-up, the National Book Critics Circle Award-winning "Being Dead" (1999)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2010 | By Richard Eder
All That Follows A Novel Jim Crace Nan A. Talese / Doubleday: 230 pp., $25.95 British novelist Jim Crace has written in "Gift of Stones" about a Stone Age community that senses its doom when a Bronze Age tribe settles nearby. He has written in "Quarantine" of a young and annoying Jesus spending his 40 desert days among craggy cave-dwelling neighbors. In "Being Dead" he has written of the life in and around the decaying bodies of a murdered husband and wife. In an odd way, each of those novels is a masterpiece.
BOOKS
April 29, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In this beautifully polished short novel, Jim Crace re-creates the last days of a Neolithic village, whose inhabitants earn their livelihoods by chipping flints into blades for tools and weapons. The misfit in their rigidly circumscribed world is the narrator's stepfather, barred from a life of working the brittle stone by the amputation of his right hand. He learns to fashion words instead, shaping tales with the care and skill that his relatives reserve for their most delicately edged blades.
BOOKS
November 9, 2003 | Heller McAlpin, Heller McAlpin is a regular contributor to Book Review.
There are writers -- though not many -- who permanently alter the way you view even the most quotidian subject. Anyone who's read Nicholson Baker's "The Mezzanine" will never again regard a shoelace as just a bit of string. Similarly, anyone who's read Jim Crace's "Being Dead," winner of the 2000 National Book Critics Circle award, will no longer think of a corpse as just a body that has ceased to breathe.
BOOKS
April 12, 1998 | RICHARD EDER
A cool metaphysician, the British writer Jim Crace sets his novels in a prehistoric past ("The Gift of Stones") or hypothetical future ("Arcadia") to test out the pulse of our present-day spirits. This gives him the equivalent of a dust-free laboratory, free of the distractions, fads and obsessions of the world around us. Uncrowded and perhaps excessively bare, it allows space for the large sorts of inquiry that our contemporary minds might find uncomfortable in a contemporary setting.
BOOKS
October 4, 1992 | RICHARD EDER
The true characters in the fiction of the British writer Jim Crace are not individuals but communities. In the superb and haunting "The Gift of Stones," it was a late Stone Age clan of weapons-makers, uprooted and set to wandering by the advent of Bronze Age technology.
BOOKS
January 28, 1996 | Brian Finney, Brian Finney teaches literature at Cal State Long Beach. He is writing a book about contemporary British novelists
In 1986, the British writer Jim Crace gained recognition for "Continent," his first work of fiction, by winning three national book prizes. Set in an imaginary continent, it strung together seven narratives, each of which explored the destructive effect of modern development on an earlier civilization. His second novel, "The Gift of Stones," was set in the late Stone Age and attracted equally enthusiastic notices. John Fowles compared it to the work of William Golding.
BOOKS
April 9, 1989
The Neolithic village in "The Gift of Stones" is on the cutting edge of technological progress. Its craftsmen make the finest flint tools and weapons in the region. Merchants come long distances to barter for them. Even the roving bands of marauders are forced to trade instead of rob, since in order to rob, they need the knives and arrows that the villagers produce. Seemingly, the village is impregnable; its inhabitants are peaceable, hard-working, narrow-minded and smug. There is nothing like a cutting edge for blunting the imagination.
BOOKS
April 29, 2007 | John Freeman, John Freeman is president of the National Book Critics Circle.
DEEP down, Jim Crace swears he's as sunny as the next fellow. He has a strange way of showing it. His 1999 novel, "Being Dead," begins with the blunt-force trauma deaths of two main characters. Others feature wind-gouged landscapes, starvation, even the ravages of Christ's journey through the wilderness. Sitting recently in the sunny garden of his home in Birmingham, England, the two-time Man Booker Prize finalist insists that these locales and topics don't reveal a dark spirit.
BOOKS
April 29, 2007 | Emily Barton, Emily Barton's novel "Brookland" was recently published in paperback.
JIM CRACE is among the most inventive writers working in English today, a talent that was recognized when he won the National Book Critics Circle Award in 2000 for "Being Dead." "Quarantine," about Jesus' sojourn in the desert, and "Continent," a series of linked stories concerning a fictional continent, are among my favorite books by living authors, chiefly because of the breadth of Crace's creative intelligence.
BOOKS
November 9, 2003 | Heller McAlpin, Heller McAlpin is a regular contributor to Book Review.
There are writers -- though not many -- who permanently alter the way you view even the most quotidian subject. Anyone who's read Nicholson Baker's "The Mezzanine" will never again regard a shoelace as just a bit of string. Similarly, anyone who's read Jim Crace's "Being Dead," winner of the 2000 National Book Critics Circle award, will no longer think of a corpse as just a body that has ceased to breathe.
BOOKS
April 16, 2000 | JONATHAN LEVI
"These are the instruments of sex outdoors. You need good weather, somewhere dry to stretch out far from dogs and wasps, and no sense of the ridiculous." No matter that they were a pair of homely zoologists at the uglier end of their 50s, Joseph and Celice had the good fortune of a sunny Tuesday with no classes to teach and a stretch of dune above Baritone Bay, empty of canine and insect witness to their middle-aged pleasure.
BOOKS
April 12, 1998 | RICHARD EDER
A cool metaphysician, the British writer Jim Crace sets his novels in a prehistoric past ("The Gift of Stones") or hypothetical future ("Arcadia") to test out the pulse of our present-day spirits. This gives him the equivalent of a dust-free laboratory, free of the distractions, fads and obsessions of the world around us. Uncrowded and perhaps excessively bare, it allows space for the large sorts of inquiry that our contemporary minds might find uncomfortable in a contemporary setting.
BOOKS
January 28, 1996 | Brian Finney, Brian Finney teaches literature at Cal State Long Beach. He is writing a book about contemporary British novelists
In 1986, the British writer Jim Crace gained recognition for "Continent," his first work of fiction, by winning three national book prizes. Set in an imaginary continent, it strung together seven narratives, each of which explored the destructive effect of modern development on an earlier civilization. His second novel, "The Gift of Stones," was set in the late Stone Age and attracted equally enthusiastic notices. John Fowles compared it to the work of William Golding.
BOOKS
April 29, 2007 | John Freeman, John Freeman is president of the National Book Critics Circle.
DEEP down, Jim Crace swears he's as sunny as the next fellow. He has a strange way of showing it. His 1999 novel, "Being Dead," begins with the blunt-force trauma deaths of two main characters. Others feature wind-gouged landscapes, starvation, even the ravages of Christ's journey through the wilderness. Sitting recently in the sunny garden of his home in Birmingham, England, the two-time Man Booker Prize finalist insists that these locales and topics don't reveal a dark spirit.
BOOKS
April 12, 1987 | Brian Stonehill
Here are seven related short stories that arrive on our shores already wreathed in praise. Jim Crace's "Continent" won England's Whitbread Prize for the best first "novel" of 1986, and the David Higham Prize for the year's best first work of fiction. "Continent" seems more strangely native to our New World, though, than to the Old. The stories take place, for one thing, in an exotic locale that seems to be Latin American, although the fanciful names suggest some generic Third World.
BOOKS
October 4, 1992 | RICHARD EDER
The true characters in the fiction of the British writer Jim Crace are not individuals but communities. In the superb and haunting "The Gift of Stones," it was a late Stone Age clan of weapons-makers, uprooted and set to wandering by the advent of Bronze Age technology.
BOOKS
April 29, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In this beautifully polished short novel, Jim Crace re-creates the last days of a Neolithic village, whose inhabitants earn their livelihoods by chipping flints into blades for tools and weapons. The misfit in their rigidly circumscribed world is the narrator's stepfather, barred from a life of working the brittle stone by the amputation of his right hand. He learns to fashion words instead, shaping tales with the care and skill that his relatives reserve for their most delicately edged blades.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|