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Jim De Castro

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February 7, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than five months after knocking classical music off the air in favor of rock music, KKBT-FM has had to change formats because of dismal ratings. KKBT(92.3), which rose from the ashes of classical KFAC last September, had called itself "rock with a beat" and played contemporary hits.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER and Compiled by David (Doc) Robinson
A few weeks after Los Angeles radio station KKBT-FM (92.3) switched from rock and began playing rhythm and blues this spring, superstar Stevie Wonder went on the air at rival KJLH-FM (102.3) and began telephoning his celebrity friends to counter the new competition. Wonder--who acquired KJLH from a Los Angeles undertaker in 1979--departed from his station's usual mix of music and deejay chatter and traded yarns with everyone from the Rev. Jesse Jackson to singer Little Richard.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER and Compiled by David (Doc) Robinson
A few weeks after Los Angeles radio station KKBT-FM (92.3) switched from rock and began playing rhythm and blues this spring, superstar Stevie Wonder went on the air at rival KJLH-FM (102.3) and began telephoning his celebrity friends to counter the new competition. Wonder--who acquired KJLH from a Los Angeles undertaker in 1979--departed from his station's usual mix of music and deejay chatter and traded yarns with everyone from the Rev. Jesse Jackson to singer Little Richard.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1990 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than five months after knocking classical music off the air in favor of rock music, KKBT-FM has had to change formats because of dismal ratings. KKBT(92.3), which rose from the ashes of classical KFAC last September, had called itself "rock with a beat" and played contemporary hits.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG
It was two days before 58-year-old classical music station KFAC was to die and FM-92 KKBT was to be born. The new general manager, Jim de Castro, had his sales staff assembled to watch a 10-second TV ad hyping the station's new incarnation, "Rock With a Beat." The ad featured a crowd staring down at a sleeping baby. One man in the crowd wore a Dodgers cap, another looked like a surfer, still another appeared to be a Latino immigrant. Suddenly there was a bang and the baby's eyes opened.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1989
I'll bet Jim de Castro has 2.4 children. PAUL SCHOWALTER Ontario
NEWS
January 13, 1990
I weep crocodile tears for Jim de Castro, general manager of radio station KKBT (formerly KFAC). De Castro had previously claimed that Evergreen Media did not purchase the station with advance intent to change its format from classical to rock. Now he's claiming that the station's poor showing in the ratings is because its dial position is too far to the left! Perhaps it's time for De Castro and Evergreen to face the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Radio station KPFK-FM, in an unusual gesture, broadcast an early wake Tuesday afternoon for its neighbor on the FM dial, KFAC, the pre-eminent classical music station that is expected to change formats in September. During the first hour of the two-hour program, some 20 listeners called in to lament news of KFAC's impending change. KPFK host William Malloch called his program " a sort of a funeral for KFAC."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1990 | JOE VELAZQUEZ
A critical lack of funds has made a virtual prisoner of the 50,000 recordings donated to Stanford University by KFAC, Los Angeles' late classical music radio station. Nearly eight months after being officially donated, the collection is languishing behind locked doors of a second-story, environmentally controlled storage area in the Braun Music Center on the Palo Alto campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "soft hits" format is still king of the Los Angeles radio hill. KOST-FM(103.5) triumphed again over the Top 40 format of KIIS and the dance music of KPWR to retain its No. 1 spot as the area's favorite radio station, the Arbitron ratings revealed Tuesday. Most of the top-rated stations in the survey, which covers the 12-week period from March 29 to June 20, remained unchanged from last quarter's rating. Top 40 station KIIS-FM/AM (102.7) stayed at No. 2, KPWR-FM (105.5) remained at No.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG
It was two days before 58-year-old classical music station KFAC was to die and FM-92 KKBT was to be born. The new general manager, Jim de Castro, had his sales staff assembled to watch a 10-second TV ad hyping the station's new incarnation, "Rock With a Beat." The ad featured a crowd staring down at a sleeping baby. One man in the crowd wore a Dodgers cap, another looked like a surfer, still another appeared to be a Latino immigrant. Suddenly there was a bang and the baby's eyes opened.
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