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Jim Deshaies

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SPORTS
August 15, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Third baseman Gary Sheffield gazed out the window Friday on the team bus before the Padres' 5-1 victory over the Cincinnati Reds and suddenly was overwhelmed by painful memories. Now a leading candidate to win the National League's Most Valuable Player award and a threat to win the triple crown, Sheffield remembered the trepidation that obsessed him only four months ago. "I'm telling you," Sheffield said, "I was scared to death. I was wondering if I'd make it in this league.
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SPORTS
June 25, 1994 | From Associated Press
Jim Deshaies turned a slight adjustment into a large advantage. Troubled all season by an inability to keep his pitches down in the strike zone, Deshaies (4-7) used a shortened windup and a different release point Friday night to limit the Kansas City Royals to one run and four hits in eight innings in a 4-1 victory for the Twins at Minneapolis. The victory, which ended Minnesota's three-game losing streak, was only Deshaies' second victory since April.
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SPORTS
January 28, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Free-agent pitchers Goose Gossage and Jim Deshaies were invited to spring training by the Oakland Athletics.
SPORTS
December 9, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just when the Padres were starting to feel good about their rotation, left-handed starter Jim Deshaies abruptly departed Tuesday night for the Minnesota Twins. Deshaies, according to a source familiar with the negotiations, signed a one-year contract for a base salary of $700,000 with incentives that could pay him an additional $250,000. Deshaies also can exercise an option for 1994 that will pay him $700,000 or provide a $300,000 buyout.
SPORTS
January 25, 1991
Three pitchers--Bobby Witt of Texas, Joe Magrane of St. Louis and Jim Deshaies of Houston--avoided arbitration by signing contracts for the 1991 season. Witt, who had a 12-game winning streak last season, agreed to a three-year contract worth $7.3 million. He was 17-10 and had the longest winning streak in the major leagues since Roger Clemens of the Boston Red Sox went 14-0 to start the 1986 season. Witt's 221 strikeouts were second in the American League behind teammate Nolan Ryan's 232.
SPORTS
June 25, 1994 | From Associated Press
Jim Deshaies turned a slight adjustment into a large advantage. Troubled all season by an inability to keep his pitches down in the strike zone, Deshaies (4-7) used a shortened windup and a different release point Friday night to limit the Kansas City Royals to one run and four hits in eight innings in a 4-1 victory for the Twins at Minneapolis. The victory, which ended Minnesota's three-game losing streak, was only Deshaies' second victory since April.
SPORTS
May 13, 1989 | DAN HAFNER
Although arm problems cost him almost five seasons, right-hander Rick Reuschel of the San Francisco Giants has reached the 200-victory mark. Reuschel, who will turn 40 Tuesday, held the Expos to four hits before faltering in the ninth inning Friday night at Montreal. Rich Gossage then came on to get the last out in a 2-1 victory. Reuschel (6-2) had a string of 22 consecutive scoreless innings until Tom Foley singled, went to second on an infield out and scored on Hubie Brooks' single in the ninth.
SPORTS
August 8, 1992 | SCOTT MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That's D-E-S-H-A-I-E-S. Jim. Cast aside by the Houston Astros after last season, released by Oakland in March and banished to triple-A Las Vegas in late April after spending a month without a team, James Joseph Deshaies put in several pitches toward showing the Astros what could have been on Friday night. It was a night the Astros will not soon forget. In leading the Padres to a 4-2 victory in front of 21,589, Deshaies haunted his old mates in just about every conceivable way.
SPORTS
December 9, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just when the Padres were starting to feel good about their rotation, left-handed starter Jim Deshaies abruptly departed Tuesday night for the Minnesota Twins. Deshaies, according to a source familiar with the negotiations, signed a one-year contract for a base salary of $700,000 with incentives that could pay him an additional $250,000. Deshaies also can exercise an option for 1994 that will pay him $700,000 or provide a $300,000 buyout.
SPORTS
June 2, 1989 | JERRY CROWE, Times Staff Writer
On the first day of hurricane season, the Dodgers breezed into town for the first game of an eight-game trip Thursday night and were promptly blown out of the Astrodome by the Houston Astros. They managed only two hits against left-hander Jim Deshaies, neither of them before the eighth inning of a 7-2 loss. And neither was worth bragging about. Or as the Dodgers' Mickey Hatcher put it afterward, "Take away two donkey hits and he's got a no-hitter." Hatcher ended the no-hit bid with two out in the eighth, sending a grounder back through the middle that probably could have been handled by shortstop Rafael Ramirez if Deshaies hadn't deflected the ball.
SPORTS
August 28, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Deshaies was told he would be staying in San Diego for a day. He packed his duffel bag, left his family behind and didn't even bother inquiring about a pass to Sea World. But a funny thing happened on Deshaies' return trip to Las Vegas. He never left San Diego. He hung around for another week . . . was told to stay until the end of the month . . . and then emerged as a fixture in the Padre starting rotation.
SPORTS
August 15, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Third baseman Gary Sheffield gazed out the window Friday on the team bus before the Padres' 5-1 victory over the Cincinnati Reds and suddenly was overwhelmed by painful memories. Now a leading candidate to win the National League's Most Valuable Player award and a threat to win the triple crown, Sheffield remembered the trepidation that obsessed him only four months ago. "I'm telling you," Sheffield said, "I was scared to death. I was wondering if I'd make it in this league.
SPORTS
August 8, 1992 | SCOTT MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
That's D-E-S-H-A-I-E-S. Jim. Cast aside by the Houston Astros after last season, released by Oakland in March and banished to triple-A Las Vegas in late April after spending a month without a team, James Joseph Deshaies put in several pitches toward showing the Astros what could have been on Friday night. It was a night the Astros will not soon forget. In leading the Padres to a 4-2 victory in front of 21,589, Deshaies haunted his old mates in just about every conceivable way.
SPORTS
January 28, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Free-agent pitchers Goose Gossage and Jim Deshaies were invited to spring training by the Oakland Athletics.
SPORTS
January 25, 1991
Three pitchers--Bobby Witt of Texas, Joe Magrane of St. Louis and Jim Deshaies of Houston--avoided arbitration by signing contracts for the 1991 season. Witt, who had a 12-game winning streak last season, agreed to a three-year contract worth $7.3 million. He was 17-10 and had the longest winning streak in the major leagues since Roger Clemens of the Boston Red Sox went 14-0 to start the 1986 season. Witt's 221 strikeouts were second in the American League behind teammate Nolan Ryan's 232.
SPORTS
June 2, 1989 | JERRY CROWE, Times Staff Writer
On the first day of hurricane season, the Dodgers breezed into town for the first game of an eight-game trip Thursday night and were promptly blown out of the Astrodome by the Houston Astros. They managed only two hits against left-hander Jim Deshaies, neither of them before the eighth inning of a 7-2 loss. And neither was worth bragging about. Or as the Dodgers' Mickey Hatcher put it afterward, "Take away two donkey hits and he's got a no-hitter." Hatcher ended the no-hit bid with two out in the eighth, sending a grounder back through the middle that probably could have been handled by shortstop Rafael Ramirez if Deshaies hadn't deflected the ball.
SPORTS
May 9, 1989 | STEVE JACOBSON, Newsday
In the photographs that Jim Deshaies stores in his mind there are the images of sitting on the bench of the Ft. Lauderdale Yankees. Next to him are Jose Rijo and Tim Birtsas and they don't dare dream to each other about pitching in Yankee Stadium. "I'd think I wanted to get to Double-A," Deshaies said. "When I got to Double-A, I thought, I can't wait to get to Triple-A. Of course, you always have your dreams." And in the Yankees' organization the word was out for budding young pitchers.
SPORTS
September 24, 1986 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
That ol' Texas gunslinger, Nolan Ryan, never reached for his holster. Mike Scott, the split-fingered assassin, never showed his hand. But one by one Tuesday night, like clay pigeons in a skeet shoot, the Dodgers were blasted out of the batter's box in record-breaking fashion in a 4-0 loss to Houston at the Astrodome. The first eight Dodgers to come to the plate returned to the dugout as strikeout victims, a display of batting futility unprecedented in baseball's modern era.
SPORTS
May 13, 1989 | DAN HAFNER
Although arm problems cost him almost five seasons, right-hander Rick Reuschel of the San Francisco Giants has reached the 200-victory mark. Reuschel, who will turn 40 Tuesday, held the Expos to four hits before faltering in the ninth inning Friday night at Montreal. Rich Gossage then came on to get the last out in a 2-1 victory. Reuschel (6-2) had a string of 22 consecutive scoreless innings until Tom Foley singled, went to second on an infield out and scored on Hubie Brooks' single in the ninth.
SPORTS
May 9, 1989 | STEVE JACOBSON, Newsday
In the photographs that Jim Deshaies stores in his mind there are the images of sitting on the bench of the Ft. Lauderdale Yankees. Next to him are Jose Rijo and Tim Birtsas and they don't dare dream to each other about pitching in Yankee Stadium. "I'd think I wanted to get to Double-A," Deshaies said. "When I got to Double-A, I thought, I can't wait to get to Triple-A. Of course, you always have your dreams." And in the Yankees' organization the word was out for budding young pitchers.
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