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Jim Doehring

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SPORTS
August 6, 1989 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, Times Staff Writer
Jim Doehring, a 1988 Olympic shotputter, is caught in a contradiction: He is concerned about the abuse of steroids but is not willing to give up his own use for fear of being left behind. Doehring admitted Friday that he has used steroids to help him remain a world-class track and field competitor, but he also said he wishes he didn't feel a need to do so. "I'd love to do that (compete drug-free against drug-free opponents)," he said. "I know I can throw clean just as far as anyone can."
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NEWS
August 1, 1992 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was one of track and field's truly inglorious moments. The medalists in the men's shotput sat at a dais Friday night to meet the international media after the first track competition of these Olympics. But instead of discussions on technique, strategy and hard work, the press conference was all about drug use. For the first time in Olympic history, three medalists in one event had all, at one time, been banned for taking performance-enhancing drugs.
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SPORTS
February 20, 1987 | BARBIE LUDOVISE
High on a grassy knoll, overlooking silky green hills and empty blue skies, a 16-pound steel ball is heaved through the air and lands, crunch!, on a bed of weeds and crushed red brick. Jim Doehring, the sixth-ranked shotputter in the United States, makes a mental note of the throw's distance while readying himself for another try. He is preparing for the Los Angeles Times/GTE Indoor Games tonight at 7:30 in the Forum.
SPORTS
July 4, 1992 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic officials are huddling this weekend, trying to determine the status of shotputter Jim Doehring, whose felony conviction six months ago has put his eligibility in question. A newspaper reported Friday that Doehring, who lives in Fallbrook and qualified for the Olympic team last weekend, pleaded guilty last Dec. 16 to conspiring to possess methamphetamine with intent to distribute, a federal criminal charge.
SPORTS
July 16, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Seven years ago, when he was 19, Jim Doehring was the U.S. junior champion in the shotput and he was looking forward to the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, near his home in San Clemente. Within days, he was in the hospital with three steel rods in his back, wondering whether he would ever compete again. While riding his motorcycle in Newport Beach, he collided with a pickup truck and, according to a witness, was thrown about 100 feet, breaking his jaw in several places and his back.
SPORTS
September 17, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A drug appeals board of The Athletics Congress has upheld a two-year suspension of shotputter Jim Doehring, whose random test showed a higher-than-allowed level of the male hormone testosterone. His suspension will run through Dec. 6, 1992.
SPORTS
March 26, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jim Doehring, the 1990 U.S. shotput champion who was suspended after a positive drug test, was reinstated by an arbitrator because of "procedural improprieties" at a testing laboratory, The Athletics Congress said. Lisa Bingham of the arbitration panel said a technician at a laboratory in Indianapolis inadvertently opened a shipping container that contained a sealed sample, and that act "constituted a breach in the chain of custody." Doehring, 30, of Fallbrook, Calif.
SPORTS
February 27, 1991 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Doehring, the world's third-ranked shotputter in 1990, was informed earlier this month by The Athletics Congress that he has been suspended for two years after failing a drug test. According to sources, Doehring, 29, was discovered to have a higher ratio of the male hormone testosterone to epitestosterone than allowed by track and field rules in a random, out-of-competition test taken in his home last December in Fallbrook.
SPORTS
July 4, 1992 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic officials are huddling this weekend, trying to determine the status of shotputter Jim Doehring, whose felony conviction six months ago has put his eligibility in question. A newspaper reported Friday that Doehring, who lives in Fallbrook and qualified for the Olympic team last weekend, pleaded guilty last Dec. 16 to conspiring to possess methamphetamine with intent to distribute, a federal criminal charge.
SPORTS
June 28, 1992 | KIM KUTCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jim Doehring had been there before. A strong effort in his final attempt in the men's shotput could ensure him a spot on the Olympic team. At the U.S. Olympic track and field trials Saturday at Tad Gormley Stadium, Doehring's distance of 67 feet 11 3/4 inches on his fourth attempt propelled him from eighth place to third. On his sixth and final attempt, Doehring, still in third, stepped into the ring and went 69-2, which placed him second.
SPORTS
June 28, 1992 | KIM KUTCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jim Doehring had been there before. A strong effort in his final attempt in the men's shotput could ensure him a spot on the Olympic team. At the U.S. Olympic track and field trials Saturday at Tad Gormley Stadium, Doehring's distance of 67 feet 11 3/4 inches on his fourth attempt propelled him from eighth place to third. On his sixth and final attempt, Doehring, still in third, stepped into the ring and went 69-2, which placed him second.
SPORTS
March 26, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Jim Doehring, the 1990 U.S. shotput champion who was suspended after a positive drug test, was reinstated by an arbitrator because of "procedural improprieties" at a testing laboratory, The Athletics Congress said. Lisa Bingham of the arbitration panel said a technician at a laboratory in Indianapolis inadvertently opened a shipping container that contained a sealed sample, and that act "constituted a breach in the chain of custody." Doehring, 30, of Fallbrook, Calif.
SPORTS
September 17, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A drug appeals board of The Athletics Congress has upheld a two-year suspension of shotputter Jim Doehring, whose random test showed a higher-than-allowed level of the male hormone testosterone. His suspension will run through Dec. 6, 1992.
SPORTS
February 27, 1991 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Doehring, the world's third-ranked shotputter in 1990, was informed earlier this month by The Athletics Congress that he has been suspended for two years after failing a drug test. According to sources, Doehring, 29, was discovered to have a higher ratio of the male hormone testosterone to epitestosterone than allowed by track and field rules in a random, out-of-competition test taken in his home last December in Fallbrook.
SPORTS
August 6, 1989 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, Times Staff Writer
Jim Doehring, a 1988 Olympic shotputter, is caught in a contradiction: He is concerned about the abuse of steroids but is not willing to give up his own use for fear of being left behind. Doehring admitted Friday that he has used steroids to help him remain a world-class track and field competitor, but he also said he wishes he didn't feel a need to do so. "I'd love to do that (compete drug-free against drug-free opponents)," he said. "I know I can throw clean just as far as anyone can."
SPORTS
July 16, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
Seven years ago, when he was 19, Jim Doehring was the U.S. junior champion in the shotput and he was looking forward to the 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, near his home in San Clemente. Within days, he was in the hospital with three steel rods in his back, wondering whether he would ever compete again. While riding his motorcycle in Newport Beach, he collided with a pickup truck and, according to a witness, was thrown about 100 feet, breaking his jaw in several places and his back.
NEWS
August 1, 1992 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was one of track and field's truly inglorious moments. The medalists in the men's shotput sat at a dais Friday night to meet the international media after the first track competition of these Olympics. But instead of discussions on technique, strategy and hard work, the press conference was all about drug use. For the first time in Olympic history, three medalists in one event had all, at one time, been banned for taking performance-enhancing drugs.
SPORTS
July 16, 1989 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Olympic Festival this week at Oklahoma City will provide different opportunities for the 75 or so Orange County athletes who will participate. For athletes such as 1988 Olympic shotputters Jim Doehring and Bonnie Dasse and Peter Campbell, a two-time Olympic water polo player, the Olympic Festival represents a chance to get together with friends--and rivals--while competing largely free of high stakes and pressure.
SPORTS
February 20, 1987 | BARBIE LUDOVISE
High on a grassy knoll, overlooking silky green hills and empty blue skies, a 16-pound steel ball is heaved through the air and lands, crunch!, on a bed of weeds and crushed red brick. Jim Doehring, the sixth-ranked shotputter in the United States, makes a mental note of the throw's distance while readying himself for another try. He is preparing for the Los Angeles Times/GTE Indoor Games tonight at 7:30 in the Forum.
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