Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJim Ed Norman
IN THE NEWS

Jim Ed Norman

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1992 | HEIDI SIEGMUND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Recording artists are getting the heave-ho-ho this holiday season as part of an ill-timed Grinch tradition. It's an annual end-of-the-year rite in the recording business, a serious kind of musical chairs when stars set out in search of new record labels, when companies pass on some acts' contract renewals, when labels simply drop some performers altogether.
ARTICLES BY DATE
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1994 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The fates sometimes work in strange, ironic ways. What curious forces conspired to propel three cousins from the small community of Ferriday, La., into the national spotlight in their respective fields? The lives and careers of Jerry Lee Lewis, Jimmy Swaggart and country singer Mickey Gilley--the latter of whom performs Monday night at the Crazy Horse Steak House in Santa Ana--read like a poorly written TV drama, but fact often is stranger than bad fiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1999 | MICHAEL McCALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Faith Hill is the last person many country insiders expected to be going into next week's Academy of Country Music Awards ceremony with the most nominations. Country's leading young belle through the mid-1990s, she de-escalated her career in 1996 to marry fellow country star Tim McGraw and start a family. By the time she was ready to reenter the arena last year, much had changed, and many observers wondered if she would be able to still compete on a mega-star level.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1988 | HOLLY GLEASON
How much has the shine faded from the "Urban Cowboy" movement? Ask Mickey Gilley. Despite his racking up eight No. 1 country singles in the 2 years after the "Urban Cowboy" movie helped catapult Gilley to the top of the sales charts in 1980, last year CBS Records dropped his contract. But then, that's just one of several setbacks the Louisiana-born singer has had to weather lately.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1998 | MICHAEL McCALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the recording executives and artists at tonight's Country Music Assn. Awards ceremony seem unusually upbeat, it might be due to what's happening on radio. With country records receiving unprecedented airplay on pop radio, industry leaders are hoping for yet another boom in the sales of country albums. The reasoning goes like this: If country music accounts for 14% of all U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1986 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Who would have thought that Los Angeles rock clubs would be the launching pad for a country music revolution? But that's just what many observers feel is happening in the wake of the dramatic mainstream country acceptance of L.A.-based maverick Dwight Yoakam. Rejected by the Nashville kingmakers, the 29-year-old Kentucky native found a home in the L.A. rock clubs last year and used that unlikely base to establish his country credibility. Now Yoakam is a bona fide country star.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2003 | Michael McCall, Special to The Times
The country music industry expected this to be a bountiful year. Record executives here banked on several of its biggest stars, especially the women who carried the genre through the late '90s, to soar to the top of the charts with new releases. But instead of soaring, the women sputtered. Some even crashed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1986 | BARBARA PEPE
The invitation offered an evening of "Songs Never Intended to Be Recorded," and Nashville's "secretly sick" songwriters made sure that the parodies and mildly off-color tunes lived up to the billing. One of the town's more successful authors stood on the stage of the packed club and, with apologies to colleague Thom Schuyler, began to lampoon his hit "16th Avenue." Purposely nasal, he twanged the story of a stranger in town who points his Cadillac the wrong way down the one-way street.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1996 | ROBIN RAUZI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most folks laughed when the title characters of "The Blues Brothers" sauntered into a honky-tonk and asked, "What kind of music do you usually have here?" "Oh, we got both kinds," the barmaid replied. "Country and western." Michael Martin Murphey undoubtedly got the joke but he might not have laughed. Murphey has had a 25-year genre-hopping musical career, ranging from 1970s pop hits such as "Geronimo's Cadillac" and "Wildfire" to the No. 1 country single, "Long Line of Love," in 1987.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1991 | ROBERT HILBURN
The pop world is littered with recording artists whose lives were shattered by fast-lane excesses, but there's also a trail of executives whose careers were derailed. None of those power brokers fell as far or as hard as Phil Walden. Walden's hair is graying now, but he still has the strong, determined jaw and the passion in his speech that remind you of the time in the '60s and '70s when he was the golden boy of the record industry.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|