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Jim Emerson

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1994
In my Sept. 11 Calender piece about a film critic's experience co-writing a Hollywood movie, I in no way meant to slight the contribution of one of my co-writers, Stephen Hibbert. As the ampersands between our names in the Writers Guild-approved credits indicate, Hibbert & Julia Sweeney & I worked as a team on "It's Pat." JIM EMERSON Los Angeles
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1992
In response to "Demonstrators Denounce Gay Pride Month in Schools," June 23: You couldn't find a better demonstration of the need for public school education about homosexuality than the blind hatred and fear with which parents and students reacted to the Los Angeles Unified School District's Gay and Lesbian Pride Month proclamation. People--especially kids who are dealing with their own sexuality--need to know what homosexuality is and understand that it's nothing to fear or hate, in themselves or others, any more than right-handedness or left-handedness.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1994
Jim Emerson's "I, Screenwriter" (Sept. 11) exemplified the politics of the "it's who -you-know-not- what -you-know" complaint heard around town. Emerson basically says that he had no experience writing films, had a rotten pitch and yet--thanks to Julia Sweeney--found himself in the position of being a screenwriter on an $8-million comedy for Touchstone. Discussing the development process as a befuddled outsider might be amusing for him, but for those of us who take the craft of screenwriting seriously, Emerson's bafflement is a bad joke.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1987 | Pat H. Broeske
Bill Cosby jumped the gun on the critics by publicly bad-mouthing his own "Leonard Part 6." But--as early reviews pointed out--it's not as if the Cos didn't have an awful lot to do creatively with the pic, which Columbia's just released. After all, he produced and wrote the story on which the script's based. (We'll hazard a synopsis: Former secret service agent Cos un-retires because of a sinister plot concocted by a villainess to turn the world's animals into people-killers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1988 | Pat H. Broeske
Main theme running through early reviews of "Willow," the George Lucas fantasy that opened Friday: lack of originality. Some samples: The Orange County Register's Jim Emerson: "The pastiche fantasy land is made up of elements borrowed from so many places that for any viewer remotely tuned into the popular myth of the last several centuries, the picture rapidly turns into a movie theater parlor game of 'Spot That Reference.'
NEWS
January 24, 1991 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A developer's plan to build 15 luxury homes overlooking the Pacific Ocean in Malibu was rejected Wednesday by Los Angeles County officials, after neighbors complained that the proposal threatened to ruin property values in their enclave of multimillion-dollar estates. By a 4-0 vote, the county Regional Planning Commission rejected a proposal by developer Leonard Jaffe that would have allowed him to build on about two-thirds of his 17.5 acres in the exclusive Winding Way subdivision.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"It's Pat" offers a simple message of self-acceptance, asserting that what counts is who you are rather than what your gender may or may not be. The trouble is that its telling is truly terrible: no wonder Touchstone took it off its release schedule some months ago. It now winds up, starting this weekend, as a Friday and Saturday midnight show at the Sunset 5.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1994 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On television, "Pat" wasn't ready for prime time. Now, the question on the minds of Walt Disney officials is whether the androgynous character of "Saturday Night Live" fame is ready for the big screen. "It's Pat," a motion picture based on the gender-neutral character portrayed by comedian Julia Sweeney, opens Friday in three cities: Houston, Seattle and Spokane. By following this cautious approach, Disney officials say they can decide whether the movie will have wider appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
When Roger Ebert died last week little more than a day after declaring he was taking a “leave of presence,” people turned to see what the legendary film critic's final published review was. Some were dismayed to find it was a rather middling take on the Andrew Niccol-directed adaptation of Stephanie Meyer's “The Host.” It seemed somehow not enough. Then Ebert's longtime online editor Jim Emerson let it be known that there was one more on its way, a look at Terrence Malick's “To the Wonder.” Ebert had long been a supporter of the filmmaker, even including Malick's 2011 film “The Tree of Life” on his 2012 ballot for the Sight & Sound magazine poll of the greatest films of all time.
SPORTS
May 19, 1999 | SCOTT MOE
Tom Whittemore has turned the Redlands women's water polo program into a Division III dynasty. Earlier this month the Bulldogs won their fifth consecutive Division III national championship tournament. Those titles must be put into perspective: There are only 10 schools in Division III that sponsor women's water polo, 37 in Divisions I, II and III combined. But Whittemore says that doesn't diminish his team's championships, especially this year.
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