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Jim Folsom

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November 22, 1987 | Associated Press
Former two-term Gov. James E. (Big Jim) Folsom, a 6-foot, 8-inch folk hero who brought paved roads to rural Alabama and preached racial moderation in turbulent times, died Saturday at age 79. Folsom, who was blind and bedridden, became seriously ill at his home here at about 1 a.m. and died about an hour later after a heart attack. His wife, Jamelle, was at his side, said Peck Fox, administrative assistant to Lt. Gov. Jim Folsom Jr., the governor's son.
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NEWS
June 2, 1993 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thrust into the office of Alabama governor after its previous occupant, Guy Hunt, was convicted on ethics charges less than six weeks ago, Jim Folsom surprised nearly everyone with the speed with which he set about making his mark. Promising that his time in office will be a period of activism and reform, the 44-year-old Democratic governor swiftly announced that he would call a special legislative session to revamp the state's education system.
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NEWS
June 2, 1993 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thrust into the office of Alabama governor after its previous occupant, Guy Hunt, was convicted on ethics charges less than six weeks ago, Jim Folsom surprised nearly everyone with the speed with which he set about making his mark. Promising that his time in office will be a period of activism and reform, the 44-year-old Democratic governor swiftly announced that he would call a special legislative session to revamp the state's education system.
NEWS
November 22, 1987 | Associated Press
Former two-term Gov. James E. (Big Jim) Folsom, a 6-foot, 8-inch folk hero who brought paved roads to rural Alabama and preached racial moderation in turbulent times, died Saturday at age 79. Folsom, who was blind and bedridden, became seriously ill at his home here at about 1 a.m. and died about an hour later after a heart attack. His wife, Jamelle, was at his side, said Peck Fox, administrative assistant to Lt. Gov. Jim Folsom Jr., the governor's son.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2010 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Gertrude Stein may have felt that a "rose is a rose is a rose," but not Jacob Maarse. Maarse, the venerable Pasadena florist, knew the particular pleasures of thousands of roses, from the innocently pink Bride's Dream to the flamboyantly red Dolly Parton. His favorite was Yves Piaget, a frilly, hot-pink number with a powerful scent. "It's a rose that wants to be a peony," he once told The Times, speaking with the familiarity that came from decades of nurturing two huge beds of the variety in his three-acre Sierra Madre garden.
NEWS
June 29, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Alabama Gov. Fob James, twice defeated as a Democrat, won the GOP gubernatorial nomination, stopping the historic run by state Sen. Ann Bedsole. James will face Democratic Gov. Jim Folsom on Nov. 8. By finishing second, Bedsole advanced further in a gubernatorial race in Alabama than any woman except Lurleen Wallace, who was elected in 1966 as a surrogate for her husband, George C. Wallace.
NEWS
April 30, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Newly installed Gov. Jim Folsom banned the Confederate battle flag from the state Capitol dome, a move hailed by black leaders who view it as a racist symbol. Folsom immediately had the U.S. and state flags raised atop the dome and ordered that the Confederate flag be flown across the street from the Capitol at the First White House of the Confederacy. A Montgomery, Ala., judge had ruled that state law permitted only the national and state flags to fly from the dome.
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | From Associated Press
Gov. Guy Hunt was convicted Thursday of a felony ethics charge that he looted $200,000 from his inaugural fund, and the verdict automatically ousted him as the state's first Republican governor since Reconstruction. Hunt, appearing stunned but dry-eyed, moved through the courtroom and hugged weeping supporters after the verdict was announced. He could get up to 10 years in prison and a $10,000 fine. Hunt's conviction automatically elevated Lt. Gov.
BOOKS
December 22, 1991
I am a great fan of your section, but I must admit to being confused by Patrick Goldstein's article, "Steal Magnolias" (Nov. 24). Goldstein writes that the parallels between media events of today and those of the South in the 1950s are "striking," details how George Wallace and Nicholas Katzenbach staged a media event and suggests that Southern politicians inspired Roger Ailes. But then he praises the same period and place for its genuineness and spontaneity and bemoans today's politicians for "contriving" images.
NEWS
January 5, 1985 | United Press International
Cornelia Wallace, former wife of Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace, has been committed to a state mental hospital where she is responding well to treatment, the judge in the case said Friday. Cornelia Wallace, who was divorced from the governor in 1978, was committed to Searcy Hospital Dec. 14 by Coffee County Probate Judge Marion Brunson, who was acting on the request of her mother, Ruby Folsom Austin, and brother, Charles Ellis Jr. "It was my observation that it was needed," Brunson said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2009 | times staff and wire reports
Cornelia Wallace, 69, who as first lady of Alabama threw herself over Gov. George C. Wallace after he was shot in an assassination attempt during the 1972 presidential campaign, died Thursday of cancer in Sebring, Fla. The niece of former Alabama Gov. James E. "Big Jim" Folsom, Cornelia Austin married Wallace on Jan. 4, 1971 -- just days before he began his second term as governor. As first lady, Wallace was socially active and a magnet for the press. She once drove the Indianapolis 500 pace car around the track at 100 mph. On another occasion, she took a supersonic ride in an Alabama Air National Guard Phantom Jet. However, she was far less popular than Wallace's first wife, Lurleen, who succeeded him as governor in 1967 but served only 14 months, dying of cancer.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | from Times Wire Services
Three employees of a fast-food restaurant were herded into a walk-in cooler and shot to death early Saturday, police said. A fourth worker, wounded and left for dead, crawled to a phone and called police. Less than two hours later, police arrested two people and charged them with capital murder. One of the suspects had been fired Monday from the Popeye's Famous Fried Chicken restaurant, police Capt. Jimmie Flanagan said.
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