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Jim Gall

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BUSINESS
August 26, 1990 | BRIAN MURPHY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The worst of times could be the best of times for Jim Gall and his auctioneers. With the nation's savings and loan system in shambles and regulators anxious to unload seized assets, Gall said his 11-year-old auction house is poised for profits and fame. "I'm as upset about the S&L crisis as anyone. We're all in for thousands of dollars per person for the bailout," said Gall, chairman of Miami-based Auction Co. of America. "But around here, we couldn't be busier."
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BUSINESS
August 26, 1990 | BRIAN MURPHY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The worst of times could be the best of times for Jim Gall and his auctioneers. With the nation's savings and loan system in shambles and regulators anxious to unload seized assets, Gall said his 11-year-old auction house is poised for profits and fame. "I'm as upset about the S&L crisis as anyone. We're all in for thousands of dollars per person for the bailout," said Gall, chairman of Miami-based Auction Co. of America. "But around here, we couldn't be busier."
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BUSINESS
September 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
Federal savings and loan bailout officials said Monday that they have canceled the much-promoted international satellite auction of million-dollar properties inherited from bankrupt savings and loans. L. William Seidman, chairman of Resolution Trust Corp., said the auction was canceled after the Auction Co. of America, which the agency had hired, did not contribute to a joint promotion fund.
NEWS
September 4, 1987 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Busiest time of the day in this Breathitt County hamlet in the hills of Eastern Kentucky is 7:30 a.m. That's when Quicksanders gather around the pot-bellied stove in the old post office lobby. They sit on chairs from the long-gone, one-room Quicksand school and on weathered benches to wait for Postmaster Rosa Lea Davis, 61, to sort the mail. Mail arrives early in this holler at the west end of the long, narrow, one-way bridge crossing the Kentucky River.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 1,000 people jammed the white-marble "sky lobby" of the CenTrust Bank here Saturday, many to bid hungrily for a silver-plated piece of the wreckage from the collapse of the U.S. savings and loan industry. About 16,000 pieces of Limoges china, Baccarat crystal, first edition books and even the Tiffany ashtrays in which deposed CenTrust Chairman David L. Paul ground out his gold-tipped cigarettes were snapped up in seven hours of spirited buying.
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