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Jim Garrison

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NEWS
October 22, 1992 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Garrison, the single-minded district attorney whose theories about the assassination of John F. Kennedy produced a bizarre trial and inspired a successful film, died Wednesday in New Orleans. The 24-year veteran of the Louisiana legal community--first as New Orleans district attorney and later as an appellate court judge--was 70. His death at his New Orleans home was announced in the 4th Circuit Court of Appeal where he had served for 12 years.
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BUSINESS
May 27, 1998 | James Bates
A lawsuit filed by the heirs of late New Orleans Dist. Atty. Jim Garrison seeking to challenge Hollywood's system of accounting and profit-sharing has been decertified as a class-action suit, according to lawyers in the case. U.S. District Judge Robert Takasugi in Los Angeles ruled that the case lacks class-action status for alleged antitrust allegations.
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NEWS
March 12, 1989 | AUSTIN WILSON, Associated Press
They killed the symbol of Jim Garrison's dreams, and after 25 years, he still cannot let it go. That would be the practical thing to do--just let it go--but the former prosecutor-turned-judge still believes the CIA killed President John F. Kennedy, that top government officials helped to cover up the crime and that the American people need to know what really happened. Garrison tried before and was labeled a lunatic and worse.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1997 | DI MARI RICKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If former New Orleans Dist. Atty. Jim Garrison enjoyed needling the government with his Kennedy assassination theory, he would have loved the irritation his estate is causing Hollywood. Its class-action lawsuit essentially accuses the seven major studios and the Motion Picture Assn. of America of conspiring to systematically cheat motion picture participants out of money. The suit challenges the inaptly named "net profits" arrangement so common for authors, actors and other creative talent.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1998 | James Bates
A lawsuit filed by the heirs of late New Orleans Dist. Atty. Jim Garrison seeking to challenge Hollywood's system of accounting and profit-sharing has been decertified as a class-action suit, according to lawyers in the case. U.S. District Judge Robert Takasugi in Los Angeles ruled that the case lacks class-action status for alleged antitrust allegations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1992
Thanks to The Times for opposing Warner's attempt to hype its "JFK" movie with a "study project" for our school systems. Stone miscast a discredited and paranoid district attorney, Jim Garrison, as an American hero, while portraying Garrison's victim, Clay Shaw, as a cynical scoundrel who cheated justice. In the real world, Shaw was compelled to exhaust his life savings to win acquittal from Garrison's preposterous charge of conspiring to assassinate President Kennedy. After a two-year investigation and a six-week trial, a New Orleans jury took only 54 minutes and one ballot to find Shaw innocent, whereupon Garrison promptly indicted him for perjury in testifying to his own innocence.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1991 | Nina J. Easton
With all the publicity surrounding the making of Oliver Stone's J.F.K. assassination movie, a bit of history is in order. Former New Orleans Dist. Atty. Jim Garrison, the central figure in Stone's "JFK," first sold the rights to his story to the producing-directing team of Jerry Zucker, David Zucker and Jim Abrahams (known mostly for comedies like "Airplane!" and "Naked Gun").
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1992
Regarding "Who Issues Historical Licenses Anyway?" by Jack Mathews (Film Comment, Jan. 5): I found Mathews talking out of both sides of his mouth. No child age 10 is going to open up a history book and read about Bugsy Siegel's apocalyptic visions of the now-thriving desert oasis Las Vegas. That selfsame child 10 years from now may see "JFK" and accept Ollie Stone's auteurist speculations as gospel and thereby be greatly damaged by it. In seeing "JFK," I was reminded of Eisenstein's "The Battleship Potemkin."
OPINION
December 1, 1991 | TOM BETHELL, Tom Bethell is Washington correspondent of the American Spectator
Oliver Stone's new movie about the Kennedy assassination, "JFK," scheduled for pre-Christmas release, has already received plenty of attention. It is bound to be controversial, as I can attest from my knowledge of some of the events described. The hero is Jim Garrison, played by Kevin Costner. The real Jim Garrison conducted a weird investigation of the assassination 25 years ago, when he was district attorney of New Orleans. I was employed by Garrison as a researcher on the case.
NEWS
January 19, 1997 | MICHAEL DORMAN, SPECIAL TO NEWSDAY
One of the late New Orleans Dist. Atty. Jim Garrison's investigators, a man with reputed CIA connections, once tried to doctor a photograph to make it appear that Lee Harvey Oswald had met with Fidel Castro, a long-secret FBI document reports. When it seemed impractical to put Oswald in the photograph because nobody in the original print was shaped like him, the report said, an attempt was made to place Oswald's killer, Jack Ruby, in the picture with Castro.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1995 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even in death, Jim Garrison has a cause. The estate of the late New Orleans district attorney, whose obsession with proving a John F. Kennedy assassination conspiracy was chronicled in the hit Oliver Stone film "JFK," filed a lawsuit Friday against virtually the entire movie industry over the film accounting issue of "net profits" that authors frequently contend are unfairly denied them.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Garrison, the single-minded district attorney whose theories about the assassination of John F. Kennedy produced a bizarre trial and inspired a successful film, died Wednesday in New Orleans. The 24-year veteran of the Louisiana legal community--first as New Orleans district attorney and later as an appellate court judge--was 70. His death at his New Orleans home was announced in the 4th Circuit Court of Appeal where he had served for 12 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1992
Thanks to The Times for opposing Warner's attempt to hype its "JFK" movie with a "study project" for our school systems. Stone miscast a discredited and paranoid district attorney, Jim Garrison, as an American hero, while portraying Garrison's victim, Clay Shaw, as a cynical scoundrel who cheated justice. In the real world, Shaw was compelled to exhaust his life savings to win acquittal from Garrison's preposterous charge of conspiring to assassinate President Kennedy. After a two-year investigation and a six-week trial, a New Orleans jury took only 54 minutes and one ballot to find Shaw innocent, whereupon Garrison promptly indicted him for perjury in testifying to his own innocence.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1992
Regarding "Who Issues Historical Licenses Anyway?" by Jack Mathews (Film Comment, Jan. 5): I found Mathews talking out of both sides of his mouth. No child age 10 is going to open up a history book and read about Bugsy Siegel's apocalyptic visions of the now-thriving desert oasis Las Vegas. That selfsame child 10 years from now may see "JFK" and accept Ollie Stone's auteurist speculations as gospel and thereby be greatly damaged by it. In seeing "JFK," I was reminded of Eisenstein's "The Battleship Potemkin."
BUSINESS
November 18, 1995 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even in death, Jim Garrison has a cause. The estate of the late New Orleans district attorney, whose obsession with proving a John F. Kennedy assassination conspiracy was chronicled in the hit Oliver Stone film "JFK," filed a lawsuit Friday against virtually the entire movie industry over the film accounting issue of "net profits" that authors frequently contend are unfairly denied them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1991 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer is a national correspondent for the Los Angeles Times.
It's not Vietnam, Salvador or even Dealey Plaza in Dallas, just the dubbing stage at Skywalker Sound in Santa Monica. But Oliver Stone is once again at war. "Call me a guerrilla historian," Stone says, munching a turkey sandwich while the last frame of the famous Zapruder 8-millimeter "home movie" showing President John F. Kennedy getting his head blown off plays over and over on the screening room wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1991 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer is a national correspondent for the Los Angeles Times.
It's not Vietnam, Salvador or even Dealey Plaza in Dallas, just the dubbing stage at Skywalker Sound in Santa Monica. But Oliver Stone is once again at war. "Call me a guerrilla historian," Stone says, munching a turkey sandwich while the last frame of the famous Zapruder 8-millimeter "home movie" showing President John F. Kennedy getting his head blown off plays over and over on the screening room wall.
OPINION
December 1, 1991 | TOM BETHELL, Tom Bethell is Washington correspondent of the American Spectator
Oliver Stone's new movie about the Kennedy assassination, "JFK," scheduled for pre-Christmas release, has already received plenty of attention. It is bound to be controversial, as I can attest from my knowledge of some of the events described. The hero is Jim Garrison, played by Kevin Costner. The real Jim Garrison conducted a weird investigation of the assassination 25 years ago, when he was district attorney of New Orleans. I was employed by Garrison as a researcher on the case.
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