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Jim Hall

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1997 | DON HECKMAN
Mark this as one of Hall's stranger outings. Given free rein to come up with a group of compositions largely written for either string or brass ensembles, Hall has come up with works that hark back to the Third Stream music of the late '50s and early '60s. Hall is an effective orchestrator who handles the ensemble passages with considerable skill, conjuring up interesting harmonic textures and some appropriately contemporary twittering string sounds.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By Don Heckman
Jim Hall, a jazz guitarist, composer and arranger whose subtle, lyrical playing style was favored by such iconic jazz artists as Sonny Rollins, Bill Evans, Paul Desmond and Ella Fitzgerald, has died in New York. He was 83. Hall died in his sleep Tuesday at his apartment in Greenwich Village, according to his wife, Jane. Although he had been in poor health, Hall made music up to the end with the same creative enthusiasm that enlivened his seven-decade career. As recently as a month ago, he performed with his trio in a concert at Jazz at Lincoln Center's Allen Room, and he was planning a tour of Japan with Ron Carter in January.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2013 | By Don Heckman
Jim Hall, a jazz guitarist, composer and arranger whose subtle, lyrical playing style was favored by such iconic jazz artists as Sonny Rollins, Bill Evans, Paul Desmond and Ella Fitzgerald, has died in New York. He was 83. Hall died in his sleep Tuesday at his apartment in Greenwich Village, according to his wife, Jane. Although he had been in poor health, Hall made music up to the end with the same creative enthusiasm that enlivened his seven-decade career. As recently as a month ago, he performed with his trio in a concert at Jazz at Lincoln Center's Allen Room, and he was planning a tour of Japan with Ron Carter in January.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Guitarist Jim Hall, an understated yet profoundly influential presence on jazz guitar, died in his sleep Tuesday morning at his New York City home. He was 83. Hall, whose career began in the '50s as part of the West Coast jazz scene with Jimmy Giuffre and Chico Hamilton, recorded with wealth of jazz royalty over his career, including Ben Webster, Ella Fitzgerald, Bill Evans and Sonny Rollins, who worked with Hall on his landmark 1962 album "The Bridge" as well as his celebrated 2011 live release, "Road Shows Vol 2. " The guitarist led his own trio since the '60s, and continued to maintain a busy recording and touring schedule.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was hard to understand why the Jazz Bakery wasn't overflowing with guitarists Thursday night for the opening performance by Jim Hall and Scott Colley. How often, after all, does one get to hear one of the finest jazz guitarists in the world, working in a chamber music setting with the sole accompaniment of a talented young bassist? Not very often at all, in fact, and it was a revelation to hear Hall at the top of his game, performing in such relatively spontaneous fashion.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
Jim Hall speaks softly and carries an electric guitar. If he has never attained the fame many fellow musicians feel he has earned, it could be due to the lack of any aggressive trait in his personality. He is nevertheless secure, having been sought out by some of the most eminent soloists in jazz. At present he has his own quartet, has managed to bring it with him from New York, and will be appearing tonight at McCabe's in Santa Monica.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER
Guitarist Jim Hall, a former Angeleno (he first came to prominence here, in 1956, with the Chico Hamilton Quintet), made one of his rare visits from New York on Sunday, when he played for an overflow house at the Jazz Bakery. Though he has been compared to everyone from Charlie Christian to Django Reinhardt, Hall has long since developed his own persona, characterized by a sensitive, often subdued sound and by uniquely ethereal compositions.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1994 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most often, memoirs are published in book form. But guitarist Jim Hall--who in his four-decade career has offered his clear-water sound and biting sense of swing with such greats as Sonny Rollins, Ella Fitzgerald, Itzhak Perlman and Paul Desmond--has chosen to gather his memorable moments in song form.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For seven years, National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Jim Hall has been the nation's official explainer of air crashes, tersely describing failures of flaps, wires and human decision-making in his Tennessee drawl. Today, Hall will resign from the independent safety watchdog agency to make room for new leadership in a Bush administration. In an interview, Hall said the state of aviation safety is good, but it requires constant effort to make improvements.
NEWS
January 9, 1992 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The editors of Guitar Player magazine this month announced their selection of 25 guitarists "who shook the world"--a largely loud, fast and brash group including Jeff Beck, Jimi Hendrix, Eddie Van Halen and John McLaughlin. But among them is Jim Hall, the lone died-in-the-wool jazz player in the group. Hall, who comes to the Savoy Theater in Santa Barbara on Sunday, is a master of understatement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Anyone familiar with the sound of West Coast jazz from the 1950s knows the sound of Los Angeles-born drummer Chico Hamilton. A musician who often emphasized a subtle musical grace in his playing over snare-rattling runs, Hamilton helped forge the California sound dubbed "cool jazz" in the 1950s and launched the careers of a wealth of jazz artists both as a bandleader and an educator. Hamilton, 92, died at his New York City home Tuesday morning. The cause has not been determined, but Hamilton was diagnosed with emphysema late in life, according to his nephew Raoul Hamilton, who confirmed his death.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Richard S. Ginell
If all had gone as planned, Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos would have led an all-Spanish first half at Walt Disney Concert Hall Thursday night.  But the eminent Spanish conductor was forced to cancel his appearances due to illness last week -- and into the gap stepped young, tall Christoph Konig in what suddenly became his Los Angeles Philharmonic debut. He kept one Spanish piece --Pepe Romero's vehicle, Joaquin Rodrigo's "Concierto de Aranjuez" -- and swapped the other for Dvorák's Scherzo Capriccioso, while closing as previously scheduled with Brahms' Symphony No. 2. Konig, who hails from Dresden and holds posts in Portugal and Luxembourg, employed vigorous circular motions with his right arm, and seemed to be most effective when cranking up the tempos into overdrive.  Although he didn't quite find the lilt of the infectious tune in the Dvorák, the revved-up coda got some attention.  The Brahms symphony went by in a young man's rush; the pell-mell conclusion was played as if it were the end of Tchaikovsky's Fourth.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2009 | August Brown, Chris Barton and Randy Lewis
Glasvegas "Glasvegas" Columbia Records ** To many American ears, the Scottish band Glasvegas might sound like U2 as fronted by the dad played by Mike Myers in "So I Married an Axe Murderer." But singer James Allan's overwhelming brogue is a formidable instrument that livens up some otherwise boilerplate epic rock on the band's self-titled new album.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Guitars, guitars, everywhere. Once primarily a support instrument in jazz, the guitar has become one of its more prominently heard instruments over the last decade or so. But despite a torrent of new sounds and new players, veteran guitarists such as Jim Hall continue to set high standards for innovation and creativity. Hall made one of his rare Southland appearances Monday at the Jazz Bakery, leading a trio that also included bassist-pianist Don Thompson and drummer Terry Clarke.
NEWS
January 18, 2001 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For seven years, National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Jim Hall has been the nation's official explainer of air crashes, tersely describing failures of flaps, wires and human decision-making in his Tennessee drawl. Today, Hall will resign from the independent safety watchdog agency to make room for new leadership in a Bush administration. In an interview, Hall said the state of aviation safety is good, but it requires constant effort to make improvements.
NEWS
December 19, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Jim Hall, who has overseen investigations into the TWA Flight 800 and John F. Kennedy Jr. plane crashes during his six-year tenure as head of the National Transportation Safety Board, is resigning Jan. 18, his office said Monday. Hall informed President Clinton that he would leave, although he has two years left in his term as a board member. His term as chairman has expired, however, and he has served as acting chairman.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Guitars, guitars, everywhere. Once primarily a support instrument in jazz, the guitar has become one of its more prominently heard instruments over the last decade or so. But despite a torrent of new sounds and new players, veteran guitarists such as Jim Hall continue to set high standards for innovation and creativity. Hall made one of his rare Southland appearances Monday at the Jazz Bakery, leading a trio that also included bassist-pianist Don Thompson and drummer Terry Clarke.
SPORTS
October 13, 1985 | Alan Hunt
Lompoc took a 6-0 lead in the first quarter when quarterback Jim Hall scored on a one-yard run, capping a six-play, 48-yard drive. In the second quarter, Sheldon Canley scored on a 15-yard run and a 45-yard punt return. KEY PLAYERS Tailback Sheldon Canley (L) rang up 80 yards on 15 carries, scoring two TDs from scrimmage and another on a punt return. Jim Hall (L) completed four of six passes for 64 yards.
NEWS
November 20, 1999 | RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In his strongest terms to date, the head of the National Transportation Safety Board said Friday that the crash of EgyptAir Flight 990 "might be the result of a deliberate act," but he also lashed out at the media for "a virtual cyclone of speculation" about a possible suicide mission by one of the pilots.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was hard to understand why the Jazz Bakery wasn't overflowing with guitarists Thursday night for the opening performance by Jim Hall and Scott Colley. How often, after all, does one get to hear one of the finest jazz guitarists in the world, working in a chamber music setting with the sole accompaniment of a talented young bassist? Not very often at all, in fact, and it was a revelation to hear Hall at the top of his game, performing in such relatively spontaneous fashion.
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