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Jim Harrison

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January 28, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, susan.reynolds@latimes.com Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
JIM HARRISON presents American readers with an alternative history. In his work, people live as if their deaths mattered, not like frat boys on a bender; they seem capable of thinking one or two generations ahead. He offers -- take it or leave it -- a roomy definition of integrity endlessly open to interpretation and based on relationships with the earth, with one's family, with oneself.
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October 19, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds
"The ENGLISH Major" is to midlife crisis what "The Catcher in the Rye" is to adolescence. Now, midlife crisis has a pejorative ring to it -- the idea being that the afflicted party (male or female) flips out and behaves in an erratic fashion, leaving broken homes and shattered relationships and debt burdens and frightened children. There's another way to look at this, and it's the way Harrison, with great affection, chooses to look at his main character, Cliff, who is 60.
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April 12, 1988 | KEITH LOVE, Times Staff Writer
For years Jim Harrison has led an eccentric life, hunting, fishing, drifting across North America in an automobile and holing up in various isolated spots to write the poems and novels that have gained him a fierce following. Now, standing in the kitchen on his northern Michigan farm, he contemplates what his latest book may do to his way of life.
BOOKS
January 28, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds, susan.reynolds@latimes.com Susan Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
JIM HARRISON presents American readers with an alternative history. In his work, people live as if their deaths mattered, not like frat boys on a bender; they seem capable of thinking one or two generations ahead. He offers -- take it or leave it -- a roomy definition of integrity endlessly open to interpretation and based on relationships with the earth, with one's family, with oneself.
NEWS
January 12, 1999 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "The Searchers," the Alan Le May novel that inspired John Ford's famous movie of the same name, Texas pioneers scour the Southwestern plains pursuing an elusive band of Comanches. They are Nawyecky Comanches, says an old Indian agent, "them who never get where they are going. . . . But don't you believe it." The same might be said of another skillful perambulator of the Western plains, Jim Harrison.
BOOKS
April 10, 1988 | Georgia Jones-Davis, Jones-Davis is assistant Book Review editor
Dalva has kept a light burning in her heart for a dead husband of less than a day; for her father lost in Korea, and most of all, it seems, for the Sioux nation driven out of their rich Nebraska grasslands a century ago. She comes from a family strangely at home among the dead. She's inherited a farmhouse from a beloved grandfather that is more than adjacent to a gardenlike cemetery full of ancestors; in the house itself, death maintains a terrifying, literal presence.
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October 19, 2008 | Susan Salter Reynolds
"The ENGLISH Major" is to midlife crisis what "The Catcher in the Rye" is to adolescence. Now, midlife crisis has a pejorative ring to it -- the idea being that the afflicted party (male or female) flips out and behaves in an erratic fashion, leaving broken homes and shattered relationships and debt burdens and frightened children. There's another way to look at this, and it's the way Harrison, with great affection, chooses to look at his main character, Cliff, who is 60.
BOOKS
August 14, 1994 | Kelly Cherry, Kelly Cherry is a poet, fiction writer and essayist whose most recent book is "God's Loud Hand," a collection of poems
How life gets into art is mysterious and miraculous. A writer shapes some fictional clay, breathes a few words and then--maybe!--the clay stands up and goes for a walk. Jim Harrison's new book, "Julip," performs this amazing act of creation three times, in three novellas that seize us by the hand and take us on three different paths through the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2002 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
"Here's the thing about France," Jim Harrison says. "I'm in Paris and I go to visit the graves of Sartre and De Beauvoir. I sit down on a bench and who is sitting next to me but the old man who buried them. We go off and share a bottle of wine." Harrison knows of at least 25 young women in France, where his books sell even better than they do in the U.S. or any of the other 23 countries that love his work, who are named Dalva, after his most famous character in the novel of the same name.
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June 12, 1994 | MICHAEL WALKER, Michael Walker is a frequent contributor to Calender. and
By popular fiat, "serious" poets and novelists are supposed to while away their publish-or-perish years flogging Chaucer to boneheaded university freshmen or reveling in the pinched glory of appearing in the Sewanee River Review. They are not, generally speaking, expected to occupy a suite at the Westwood Marquis on the Columbia Pictures tab, take meetings with Mike Nichols or collapse in Jack Nicholson's hot tub at day's end. Jim Harrison has done all of the above.
BOOKS
August 21, 2005 | Jane Ciabattari, Jane Ciabattari is the author of the short-story collection "Stealing the Fire."
THE 1979 collection "Legends of the Fall" signaled that Jim Harrison was a writer who had the goods. Whether he was describing a vulture circling a dying man in the desert near Nogales, Ariz., or the adventures of three brothers who ride north from Montana to Canada to enlist in World War I, his is a raw and riveting version of the American West.
BOOKS
June 6, 2004 | Thomas Curwen, Thomas Curwen is a Times staff writer and a regular contributor to Book Review.
Jim HARRISON'S "True North" opens with a virtuosic one-page prologue that seems straight out of a dream: A rowboat drifts off the coast of Veracruz. An old man is slumped at the stern, his hands severed at the wrists, the stumps bound with duct tape. A younger man on board wonders what to do. He's missing a thumb. He has just one oar and can only drift with the current. A turtle swims by. Eventually, in a gesture of mercy, the young man pushes the old man overboard.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2002 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
"My life could have been otherwise but it wasn't," Jim Harrison writes in his disjointed memoir of an author's life, "Off to the Side," employing the trademark take-it-or-leave-it manner he used in "The Road Home" and "Legends of the Fall" and declining to draw specific conclusions about the paths he traveled.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2002 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
"Here's the thing about France," Jim Harrison says. "I'm in Paris and I go to visit the graves of Sartre and De Beauvoir. I sit down on a bench and who is sitting next to me but the old man who buried them. We go off and share a bottle of wine." Harrison knows of at least 25 young women in France, where his books sell even better than they do in the U.S. or any of the other 23 countries that love his work, who are named Dalva, after his most famous character in the novel of the same name.
BOOKS
October 8, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
THE HILL BACHELORS By William Trevor; Viking: 246 pp., $23.95 In William Trevor's hands, readers often feel as if they have wandered up the lane and are standing at the kitchen door of a house for several minutes before anyone knows they are there. In that time, an argument or a revealing conversation takes place between the occupants, and the neglected eavesdropper, the uninvited guest, is given an intimate view into the lives of strangers.
BOOKS
September 10, 2000 | Jim Harrison
There are no calls from the outside. Miracles are the perversity of literature. We should know that by now. Only that these never-revealed connections of things lead us oddly on. Caesar's legions entering Greenland's ice, the scout far in front wanting to do battle where there are no enemies, never were any enemies. * From "The Shape of the Journey: New and Collected Poems" by Jim Harrison (Copper Canyon: 466 pp., $30)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1994
Re: Dec. 29 article about trash truck driver injury in Ventura. On behalf of my family, our drivers and other employees, I wish to thank the people who came to the aid of our driver, Adrian Ochoa. He was seriously injured on Dec. 28 when a hydraulic arm on the trash truck he was operating crushed him against the vehicle. Without the fast action of Doris Hackett, the first neighbor who called 911, and the quick response of the Ventura Fire Department and Pruner Ambulance Service, this accident could have been fatal to our driver.
BOOKS
September 10, 2000 | Jim Harrison
There are no calls from the outside. Miracles are the perversity of literature. We should know that by now. Only that these never-revealed connections of things lead us oddly on. Caesar's legions entering Greenland's ice, the scout far in front wanting to do battle where there are no enemies, never were any enemies. * From "The Shape of the Journey: New and Collected Poems" by Jim Harrison (Copper Canyon: 466 pp., $30)
NEWS
January 12, 1999 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "The Searchers," the Alan Le May novel that inspired John Ford's famous movie of the same name, Texas pioneers scour the Southwestern plains pursuing an elusive band of Comanches. They are Nawyecky Comanches, says an old Indian agent, "them who never get where they are going. . . . But don't you believe it." The same might be said of another skillful perambulator of the Western plains, Jim Harrison.
BOOKS
March 31, 1996 | JOHN CLARK
Jim Harrison is one of those authors filmmakers get without getting them right. In "Revenge," a movie based on a Harrison novella, the characters lip-sync passion. "Legends of the Fall," also adapted from a Harrison novella, is a color Xerox of Montana. Readers of those books were stirred by Harrison's evocative prose and looping narrative style but all the movie audiences got were loving close-ups of Madeleine Stowe's mouth and Brad Pitt's teeth.
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