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Jim Horsman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2000
Your March 17 front-page coverage of the traditionalist/reformist math controversy in the L.A. Unified School District left out a very important point. There is no faction attempting to make reform (or constructivist) mathematics the program for teaching all students in the LAUSD. What Guillermo Mendieta (through his hunger strike) and other leaders in this struggle demand is the right to continue to include the reformed mathematics pedagogy as an option in teaching our children mathematics.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2000
Your March 17 front-page coverage of the traditionalist/reformist math controversy in the L.A. Unified School District left out a very important point. There is no faction attempting to make reform (or constructivist) mathematics the program for teaching all students in the LAUSD. What Guillermo Mendieta (through his hunger strike) and other leaders in this struggle demand is the right to continue to include the reformed mathematics pedagogy as an option in teaching our children mathematics.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1997
I was extremely disturbed to read the Jan. 26 article on the Compton School District. In my 28 years in the Los Angeles Unified School District, I have worked at seven schools and visited many more. We are not in great shape, but we have no schools with conditions nearly as bad as those portrayed in your article. I think this is a crisis situation and the full resources of the richest state should be used to correct the Compton problems. When football and basketball players receive millions every year, it is hard to understand why we can't educate children in a safe and clean environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1997
I was extremely disturbed to read the Jan. 26 article on the Compton School District. In my 28 years in the Los Angeles Unified School District, I have worked at seven schools and visited many more. We are not in great shape, but we have no schools with conditions nearly as bad as those portrayed in your article. I think this is a crisis situation and the full resources of the richest state should be used to correct the Compton problems. When football and basketball players receive millions every year, it is hard to understand why we can't educate children in a safe and clean environment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A school investigation into allegations of racism by a calculus teacher at Manual Arts High School found no basis for the charge, but resulted in a reprimand for his use of inappropriate and insensitive language in class, administrators said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Manual Arts High geared up for its annual homecoming dance and football game on a recent Friday afternoon, a sense of anticipation filled the Los Angeles campus. But in Room 235, Jim Horsman's Algebra II students hunkered down at their desks, sweating over their daily quiz. Their task: to solve three equations and one word problem--the bane of math students since before Pythagoras dreamed of theorems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A calculus teacher at Manual Arts High School who has shown remarkable success in motivating minority students to excel in math is under investigation by the Los Angeles Unified School District for allegedly making threatening and racist comments in class. Jim Horseman founded the school's calculus program with five students in 1986 and built it up this year to 30, plus eight seniors who take advanced calculus at USC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A school investigation into allegations of racism by a calculus teacher at Manual Arts High School found no basis for the charge, but resulted in a reprimand for his use of inappropriate and insensitive language in class, administrators said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Manual Arts High geared up for its annual homecoming dance and football game on a recent Friday afternoon, a sense of anticipation filled the Los Angeles campus. But in Room 235, Jim Horsman's Algebra II students hunkered down at their desks, sweating over their daily quiz. Their task: to solve three equations and one word problem--the bane of math students since before Pythagoras dreamed of theorems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A calculus teacher at Manual Arts High School who has shown remarkable success in motivating minority students to excel in math is under investigation by the Los Angeles Unified School District for allegedly making threatening and racist comments in class. Jim Horseman founded the school's calculus program with five students in 1986 and built it up this year to 30, plus eight seniors who take advanced calculus at USC.
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