Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJim Isermann
IN THE NEWS

Jim Isermann

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
September 24, 2000 | ADELE CYGELMAN, Adele Cygelman last wrote for the magazine about a Palm Springs house designed by the Jersey Devil architecture group
TROLLING THE THRIFT STORES OF PALM SPRINGS for furniture and lamps to add to his collection of 1950s and '60s furnishings had long been a pastime of Santa Monica-based artist Jim Isermann. He and partner David Blomster, also an artist, were soon captivated by the city's perfectly preserved examples of mid-century architecture, deciding three years ago to buy a steel house from the period even though, aesthetically, it was in anything but good condition.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2005 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
The wild pop of color and pattern is difficult to miss, blazing from the exterior of a new apartment building where balconies frame geometric designs in interlocking red, black, ochre and white tiles. In the building's lobby, visible through glass, the design repeats, floor to ceiling.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2002 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Since 1980, Jim Isermann has designed, built and exhibited just about everything anyone could want for a home: rugs, chairs, tables, drapes, TV consoles, light fixtures, stained-glass windows, boldly patterned paintings and cozy, fabric-covered sculptures. Over the last five years, the Palm Springs-based artist has expanded the scale of his works to include such public spaces as the entryways, interiors and facades of galleries and museums.
NEWS
December 26, 2002 | David Pagel
Jim Isermann: Lobby Wall: Isermann transforms the lobby and front windows of the Hammer's office building into an inspiring playground for the imagination. Around the marble stairway that takes visitors from street level to the second-floor galleries, Isermann has affixed vinyl wallpaper whose abstract pattern is at once wildly complicated and rigorously consistent.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1994 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is chair, department of liberal arts and sciences, Otis College of Art and Design. and
Jim Isermann is a man who sews. He spent the past year stitching together swatches and remnants purchased at swap meets and fabric stores, making bed-sized compositions of faded plaids and cornball florals that subtly remind one of an earlier time, a time of "My Three Sons" bedspreads and "Shindig" bell-bottoms. These works are on view at the Richard Telles Gallery, in an exhibition that conjures immediate references to homemade quilts, specifically the AIDS quilt.
NEWS
December 26, 2002 | David Pagel
Jim Isermann: Lobby Wall: Isermann transforms the lobby and front windows of the Hammer's office building into an inspiring playground for the imagination. Around the marble stairway that takes visitors from street level to the second-floor galleries, Isermann has affixed vinyl wallpaper whose abstract pattern is at once wildly complicated and rigorously consistent.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
Jim Isermann appears to be having a fine, relaxed time thinking about the simple pleasures of Op Art, the '60s and all those Day-Glo colors that looked so hip and cool back then. Eight wavy geometric abstractions fall under the banner of a recent spoof called Neo-Geo, a cheekily manufactured New York trend basically making fun of the pretensions of T-square abstraction.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2005 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
The wild pop of color and pattern is difficult to miss, blazing from the exterior of a new apartment building where balconies frame geometric designs in interlocking red, black, ochre and white tiles. In the building's lobby, visible through glass, the design repeats, floor to ceiling.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1987 | ROBERT McDONALD
"When I come in here, I just start laughing. I don't know why." This was the reaction of a talented local artist to the current exhibit at the Patty Aande Gallery (660 9th Ave.). The four dozen new works by Los Angeles artist Jim Isermann, as a group entitled "Nu-Flowers," are disarming in their ostensible simplicity and engaging in their evocation of a more naive era.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
On Thursday, the Santa Monica Museum of Art transformed its big, central gallery into a bracing rumpus room for the eye, the mind and the soul, courtesy of a 15-year survey of sculpture by Jim Isermann. The three dozen works in this concise presentation comprise the most satisfying show yet in the museum's inaugural year at Bergamot Station.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2002 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Since 1980, Jim Isermann has designed, built and exhibited just about everything anyone could want for a home: rugs, chairs, tables, drapes, TV consoles, light fixtures, stained-glass windows, boldly patterned paintings and cozy, fabric-covered sculptures. Over the last five years, the Palm Springs-based artist has expanded the scale of his works to include such public spaces as the entryways, interiors and facades of galleries and museums.
MAGAZINE
September 24, 2000 | ADELE CYGELMAN, Adele Cygelman last wrote for the magazine about a Palm Springs house designed by the Jersey Devil architecture group
TROLLING THE THRIFT STORES OF PALM SPRINGS for furniture and lamps to add to his collection of 1950s and '60s furnishings had long been a pastime of Santa Monica-based artist Jim Isermann. He and partner David Blomster, also an artist, were soon captivated by the city's perfectly preserved examples of mid-century architecture, deciding three years ago to buy a steel house from the period even though, aesthetically, it was in anything but good condition.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1999 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
On Thursday, the Santa Monica Museum of Art transformed its big, central gallery into a bracing rumpus room for the eye, the mind and the soul, courtesy of a 15-year survey of sculpture by Jim Isermann. The three dozen works in this concise presentation comprise the most satisfying show yet in the museum's inaugural year at Bergamot Station.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1994 | HUNTER DROHOJOWSKA-PHILP, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is chair, department of liberal arts and sciences, Otis College of Art and Design. and
Jim Isermann is a man who sews. He spent the past year stitching together swatches and remnants purchased at swap meets and fabric stores, making bed-sized compositions of faded plaids and cornball florals that subtly remind one of an earlier time, a time of "My Three Sons" bedspreads and "Shindig" bell-bottoms. These works are on view at the Richard Telles Gallery, in an exhibition that conjures immediate references to homemade quilts, specifically the AIDS quilt.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1992 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When 35-millimeter slides became the basis of art history lectures, an inside view of masterpieces became visible to anyone willing to look. Whenever a slide of a painting is projected facing the wrong direction, what appears on the screen is a reversed image of the original. The sensation created is that the viewer has been magically transported to the other side of the canvas. From here, one is granted the privilege of being able to look back at reality through the surface of the painting.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1988 | WILLIAM WILSON
Jim Isermann appears to be having a fine, relaxed time thinking about the simple pleasures of Op Art, the '60s and all those Day-Glo colors that looked so hip and cool back then. Eight wavy geometric abstractions fall under the banner of a recent spoof called Neo-Geo, a cheekily manufactured New York trend basically making fun of the pretensions of T-square abstraction.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1992 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When 35-millimeter slides became the basis of art history lectures, an inside view of masterpieces became visible to anyone willing to look. Whenever a slide of a painting is projected facing the wrong direction, what appears on the screen is a reversed image of the original. The sensation created is that the viewer has been magically transported to the other side of the canvas. From here, one is granted the privilege of being able to look back at reality through the surface of the painting.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2008 | Lynne Heffley
The California Community Foundation has received a $150,000 grant from the Getty Foundation to co-sponsor a retrospective of work done by Los Angeles County visual artists who have received CCF fellowship funds during the organization's 20-year history. "Twenty Years Ago Today: Supporting Individual Artists in L.A," at the Japanese American National Museum from Oct. 4 through Jan. 11, 2009, will feature such past CCF recipients as Lari Pittman, Jim Isermann, Rachel Rosenthal and Daniel J. Martinez.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1987 | ROBERT McDONALD
"When I come in here, I just start laughing. I don't know why." This was the reaction of a talented local artist to the current exhibit at the Patty Aande Gallery (660 9th Ave.). The four dozen new works by Los Angeles artist Jim Isermann, as a group entitled "Nu-Flowers," are disarming in their ostensible simplicity and engaging in their evocation of a more naive era.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|