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December 19, 1995 | ERIC SHEPARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forgive Jim J. Bullock if he doesn't apologize for shouting to the world that he's 40 and gay. When you've lost as many things in your life as Bullock, including money, self-esteem and countless friends, being honest is an easy challenge.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1995 | ERIC SHEPARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forgive Jim J. Bullock if he doesn't apologize for shouting to the world that he's 40 and gay. When you've lost as many things in your life as Bullock, including money, self-esteem and countless friends, being honest is an easy challenge.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2000 | JANA J. MONJI
Playwright Bill Crowe states in the program notes that "The Older Man You Always Wanted," at the Cast Theater, doesn't have a message. It's "simply meant to be an entertainment." Yet with the seemingly prerequisite shirt-doffing and some brief moments of derriere flashing, it barely manages to be even that. As this particular "older" man, Jim J. Bullock wrings what little humor there is in this meager piece, which is amazingly stuffed with tired old cliches for its short duration.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2003 | Mark Sachs, Times Staff Writer
You don't see many "evil twin" plot lines on television series these days, but for 30 glorious minutes tonight at 11, "VH1's Super Secret TV Formulas" takes you back to the golden age. There's Linda Evans cat-fighting her double on "Dynasty." There's "Knight Rider's" KITT car going grill to grill with a menacingly matching model.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Some shows, you leave humming the scenery; others, the costumes. "Howard Crabtree's When Pigs Fly" sends you out humming the sequins on the costumes. The wigs alone in this exuberant eyeful of a revue, now making its Los Angeles debut at the Coronet Theatre, are like tone poems of camp: pillowy, cartoon-land creations, threatening to lift the men beneath them somewhere, fully aloft. These wigs are big. They're also witty enough to be spun off into their own series.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
The Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle succumbed to "Reefer Madness!" Monday, awarding the little musical seven of the circle's annual awards--more than twice the number won by any other show. "Reefer" won in seven of the eight categories for which it was nominated. It lost only in the writing competition, in which its libretto was nominated--although the music and lyrics by the same two writers, Kevin Murphy and Dan Studney, did win in the category for outstanding score.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2004 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"Between the Lines" is a frustratingly uneven documentary miniseries from A&E that uses various sorts of written communication as a hook to present a collection of mostly unrelated segments that on the whole replicate the ruling aesthetic of A&E -- a network that dresses itself like a cousin to PBS, but which is largely taken up with old cop shows and various packages of true-crime sensationalism and human-interest goo.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Call me old-fashioned," says a character in "End of the World Party," "but I still believe in sex on the first date." That joke, one nugget in a gold mine of one-liners, hints at the wistful undertone in Chuck Ranberg's flat-out funny new comedy at Celebration Theatre. For the main characters--six gay men who share a summer party house on Fire Island--carefree sex seems as nostalgic as a Donna Summer tune. They'd like to commit--but how? And with whom?
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | N.F. MENDOZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brandon, Brenda, Kelly and Dylan may have piled into the Peach Pit, but there's a new hangout in teen town: Boogie's Diner. A kind of "Beverly Hills, 90210" and "Saved by the Bell" hybrid with some "Facts of Life" thrown in, the syndicated series centers on a diner/store and the seven teens who work there.
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