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Jim Jarmusch

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
It's not so much that Jim Jarmusch has edged toward the mainstream but rather that the mainstream has moved closer to him. Over the years the gravitational pull of his slant, laconic sensibility in films such as "Mystery Train," "Dead Man" and "Broken Flowers" has brought him in contact with a classic gallery of performers including Tom Waits, Joe Strummer, Gena Rowlands, Johnny Depp, Bill Murray and many more. Though he first emerged from the outcast environs of the late '70s/early '80s post-punk scene of New York, he has recently received retrospectives from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Los Angeles and the Film Society of Lincoln Center . At 61 he is no longer a punk outsider but part of the pantheon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
With the YA swoon of "Twilight" safely in the rearview mirror, movie vampires get their mojo back in the sensuous dreamscape of "Only Lovers Left Alive," one of the strongest films yet from Jim Jarmusch. A filmmaker with a deep affection for outsiders, Jarmusch sets his ode to the urbane undead - and margin-dwelling artists - in two ultra-poetic cities: Detroit, a vision of trampled grandeur on the cusp of rebirth, and worldly Tangier, its alleyways alive with the murmur of illicit doings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2005 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
The perfect way to interview filmmaker Jim Jarmusch would be not to interview him. To capture the man who has made it his life's work to illuminate the in-between moments of life, it would probably be best to simply take him to a diner or a front porch or a Japanese garden somewhere and just sit. Not talking. Or talking about whatever was actually on your mind. Just sit there for an hour or two and see what happened, what would emerge.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
It's not so much that Jim Jarmusch has edged toward the mainstream but rather that the mainstream has moved closer to him. Over the years the gravitational pull of his slant, laconic sensibility in films such as "Mystery Train," "Dead Man" and "Broken Flowers" has brought him in contact with a classic gallery of performers including Tom Waits, Joe Strummer, Gena Rowlands, Johnny Depp, Bill Murray and many more. Though he first emerged from the outcast environs of the late '70s/early '80s post-punk scene of New York, he has recently received retrospectives from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Los Angeles and the Film Society of Lincoln Center . At 61 he is no longer a punk outsider but part of the pantheon.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
Jim Jarmusch, the writer-director of "Stranger Than Paradise" and the current "Mystery Train," is a film maker with no yen for deals, huge contracts or big egos. "Ambition" he says, "can be very evil." So he sticks with the small, personal projects that have won him a reputation overseas as an American equivalent of Eric Rohmer or Ingmar Bergman. Many young film makers would hock body and soul for the chance to sell out.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
With the YA swoon of "Twilight" safely in the rearview mirror, movie vampires get their mojo back in the sensuous dreamscape of "Only Lovers Left Alive," one of the strongest films yet from Jim Jarmusch. A filmmaker with a deep affection for outsiders, Jarmusch sets his ode to the urbane undead - and margin-dwelling artists - in two ultra-poetic cities: Detroit, a vision of trampled grandeur on the cusp of rebirth, and worldly Tangier, its alleyways alive with the murmur of illicit doings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2009 | Mark Olsen
If there were a hall of fame for the super-cool and perpetually hip, Jim Jarmusch would most certainly have already been inducted. For more than 25 years, he has been making movies that function as travelogues through the cultural underground, and in many ways still sets the standard for American independent filmmaking.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1991
. . . Known for his offbeat fare ("Down by Law," "Stranger Than Paradise"), filmmaker Jim Jarmusch has finished shooting his latest--untitled--film in Helsinki, Paris and Rome, with still-to-be-filmed segments set here and in New York. Winona Ryder and Gena Rowlands are among those in "the international cast."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1992 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "Night on Earth" (selected theaters), Jim Jarmusch gives us five different, self-contained episodes in five taxis in five cities on one night. The episodic structure breaks up Jarmusch's usual funky minimalism: It makes it less of a drag. Episodic movies usually don't work; we seem to settle into a story just when it ends and we're thrust into the next one. But Jarmusch's film (rated R for language and sensuality) may be a special case.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Some vampires are coming to Cannes. Organizers of the world's most prestigious film festival have announced that “Only Lovers Left Alive,” Jim Jarmusch's vampire movie starring Tilda Swinton and Tom Hiddleston, has been added to the competition lineup. The movie centers on a centuries-old vampire couple whose life is complicated by the male vampire's bleak worldview as well as the female's loose-canon sister (Mia Wasikowska). Swinton has been a frequent presence at Cannes in recent years, appearing last year with “Moonrise Kingdom” and in 2011 with “We Need to Talk About Kevin.” For the normally prolific Jarmusch, it marks only the indie director's second film in eight years, after “The Limits of Control” in 2009.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Taylor Mead, an underground cinema legend whose comic charm and sense of the surreal inspired Andy Warhol and other seminal figures in the alternative film world, died Wednesday in Denver. He was 88. A fixture of bohemian New York who was also a poet and artist, Mead was visiting family in Colorado when he had a stroke, said his niece, Priscilla Mead. Called "the Charlie Chaplin of the 1960s underground," Mead was an elfin figure with kewpie-doll eyes who appeared, by his count, in 130 films, starting with the 1960 art house classic "The Flower Thief.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Some vampires are coming to Cannes. Organizers of the world's most prestigious film festival have announced that “Only Lovers Left Alive,” Jim Jarmusch's vampire movie starring Tilda Swinton and Tom Hiddleston, has been added to the competition lineup. The movie centers on a centuries-old vampire couple whose life is complicated by the male vampire's bleak worldview as well as the female's loose-canon sister (Mia Wasikowska). Swinton has been a frequent presence at Cannes in recent years, appearing last year with “Moonrise Kingdom” and in 2011 with “We Need to Talk About Kevin.” For the normally prolific Jarmusch, it marks only the indie director's second film in eight years, after “The Limits of Control” in 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Paradoxes abound in the films of the Finnish director Aki Kaurismaki, a master of the tragicomic. His funniest jokes tend to be the most painful ones. Seldom wavering from a lugubrious deadpan and populated with sad sacks who seem incapable of cracking a smile or shedding a tear, his films can achieve the emotional force of classic melodrama. Fables of a sort, they remain grounded in a tangible social reality. Even at their saddest and most despairing, they contain glimmers of hope. In his mid-50s and a festival favorite since the '80s, Kaurismaki has joined the ranks of the master auteurs — his latest, "Le Havre," set to open this week, was perhaps the most warmly received film at Cannes this year — but in the U.S. at least, he has remained somewhat overlooked.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's often said that the journey is the oldest of narrative forms, and much of Jim Jarmusch's career has been devoted to finding new variations on this ancient theme. His filmography abounds with road trips and wanderlust-stricken heroes, from the hepcat drifter in his no-budget debut, "Permanent Vacation," to the enigmatic hit man on a mission through Spain in his latest, "The Limits of Control. " But no Jarmusch journey has been as cosmic — as much of a trip, in every sense of the word — as his hallucinatory frontier odyssey "Dead Man. " The film earned mixed reviews when it opened in 1996, nearly a year after its premiere at the Cannes Film Festival and after a reported wrangle over the final edit between Jarmusch and the distributor, Miramax.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
There are endless ways to film a face, particularly one with such a rich landscape as Isaach De Bankole's -- cheekbones rising sharply over deep valleys, thundercloud eyes gazing straight into the gathering storm, a wide plain of a forehead riding high above, and two thick rivers that rarely smile below. In "The Limits of Control," Jim Jarmusch's absorbing and visually mesmerizing new crime thriller, the filmmaker risks everything on the power of De Bankole's face to carry us through.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 2007 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
In its own sneaky way, "Stranger Than Paradise" utterly transformed the landscape of American independent cinema. Jim Jarmusch's 1984 breakthrough belongs with such landmarks of the last quarter century as Steven Soderbergh's "sex, lies and videotapes," which inaugurated the beginning of the Sundance boom, and Quentin Tarantino's "Reservoir Dogs," which inspired a legion of slavish imitators.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1993 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With their deadpan, going-nowhere-slow style, Jim Jarmusch's movies can be seen as little commentaries on the inertia that often swamps our lives. Or you can throw out any such big-brained thoughts and simply enjoy them as gritty comedies played in the lowest key possible. Whatever the case, two of his best--"Stranger Than Paradise" and "Down by Law"--are being shown tonight at Cal State Fullerton. Admission will be free.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | GUILLERMO TORRES
In filmmaker Jim Jarmusch's cinematic world, everything is a shade of black or white. His landscapes are bleak and his characters have personalities to match. His "Stranger Than Paradise" is a funny yet sometimes-depressing look at a couple of losers--Willie and the dimwitted Eddie, two New Yorkers who spend their time at the track when they are not drinking beer or hustling card players.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2006 | Susan King
STEVE BUSCEMI isn't merely a prolific character actor who has worked with such directors as the Coen brothers, Jim Jarmusch, Quentin Tarantino, Robert Rodriguez and Michael Bay. The 48-year-old Brooklynite has become a cult icon, thanks to his indelible performances as Mr.
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