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Jim Jeffries

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SPORTS
January 26, 1999
In the 20th century, Los Angeles' only heavyweight boxing champion was Jim Jeffries, who held the title from 1899 to 1905, when, undefeated, he retired. He made an ill-advised comeback in 1910 to challenge Jack Johnson in Reno, and was badly beaten. He was the first 20th century U.S. athlete to earn a substantial income.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2008 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Before pro football came and went, before the Dodgers and Lakers left their hometowns to come here, boxing was the heart of the Los Angeles sporting world. From the early 1930s until the late 1940s, Jim Jeffries' Barn in Burbank drew boxing fans by the hundreds. Although it wasn't nearly as big as the 8,000-seat Olympic Auditorium, L.A.'s other storied boxing mecca, the musty pugilistic monument was as busy as it was beloved.
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SPORTS
July 8, 1990 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighty years ago, promoter Tex Rickard staged a fight in Reno between a black champion and a white challenger and called it "The Fight of the Century." He may have been right. The event, and a nation's reaction to it, showed vividly what America was at the time and where it was going. On a sunny, hot afternoon, Rickard matched the champion, Jack Johnson, and Jim Jeffries. The July 4 bout shocked white America into the reality that white supremacy was a myth. And a dead one at that.
REAL ESTATE
January 23, 2005 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
This Mt. Washington house was built in 1905 by evangelist Alexis Jeffries, the father of Jim Jeffries, whom sportswriters dubbed "The Great White Hope" when he tried to regain a boxing title from Jack Johnson in 1910. Jeffries, a great fighter at the turn of the century, was coaxed out of retirement for the match with Johnson, the first African American to become heavyweight champion of the world. When he failed to unseat Johnson, riots nationwide left at least 26 people dead. Back on Mt.
REAL ESTATE
January 23, 2005 | Ruth Ryon, Times Staff Writer
This Mt. Washington house was built in 1905 by evangelist Alexis Jeffries, the father of Jim Jeffries, whom sportswriters dubbed "The Great White Hope" when he tried to regain a boxing title from Jack Johnson in 1910. Jeffries, a great fighter at the turn of the century, was coaxed out of retirement for the match with Johnson, the first African American to become heavyweight champion of the world. When he failed to unseat Johnson, riots nationwide left at least 26 people dead. Back on Mt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2008 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Before pro football came and went, before the Dodgers and Lakers left their hometowns to come here, boxing was the heart of the Los Angeles sporting world. From the early 1930s until the late 1940s, Jim Jeffries' Barn in Burbank drew boxing fans by the hundreds. Although it wasn't nearly as big as the 8,000-seat Olympic Auditorium, L.A.'s other storied boxing mecca, the musty pugilistic monument was as busy as it was beloved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1998 | Cecilia Rasmussen
For more than half a century, it was a musty pugilistic monument--preserved in liniment and sweat--where generations of Los Angeles prizefighters learned the lessons of "the sweet science." The Main Street Gym, on the edge of skid row, was the rattiest workout venue in the city (some said the world), but it also was the most famous. "World Rated Boxers Train Here Daily" read a sign at the entrance.
NEWS
March 16, 1986
A minor earthquake centered three miles north of San Bernardino Saturday rattled dishes and windows in the area--and jostled at least three people--but apparently caused no damage. The temblor, which hit at 5:45 p.m., measured 3.3 on the Richter scale, a Caltech spokesman said. "We got a total of three calls," said Jim Jeffries, a San Bernardino police officer. "I guess nobody was too concerned about it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1986
A brush fire burned 80 acres near Saugus on Tuesday, but caused no injuries or damage to buildings, authorities said. The fire started about 5 p.m. and was contained about three hours later, said Capt. Jim Jeffries of the Los Angeles County Fire Department. More than 130 firefighters, two bulldozers and two water-dropping helicopters fought the fire, which burned near an abandoned Los Angeles city rehabilitation center, he said. The cause of the fire is under investigation, Jeffries said.
SPORTS
December 15, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Big Jess Willard, once the most famous athlete in America and the world heavyweight boxing champion between the eras of Jack Johnson and Jack Dempsey, died 31 years ago today. Willard was a true-to-life Oklahoma cowboy when he began a years-long quest to wrest the heavyweight championship from Jack Johnson, the widely hated black champion who had so easily beaten popular ex-champion Jim Jeffries in 1910. "I never had a glove on until I was 28," he said, years later.
SPORTS
January 26, 1999
In the 20th century, Los Angeles' only heavyweight boxing champion was Jim Jeffries, who held the title from 1899 to 1905, when, undefeated, he retired. He made an ill-advised comeback in 1910 to challenge Jack Johnson in Reno, and was badly beaten. He was the first 20th century U.S. athlete to earn a substantial income.
SPORTS
July 8, 1990 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighty years ago, promoter Tex Rickard staged a fight in Reno between a black champion and a white challenger and called it "The Fight of the Century." He may have been right. The event, and a nation's reaction to it, showed vividly what America was at the time and where it was going. On a sunny, hot afternoon, Rickard matched the champion, Jack Johnson, and Jim Jeffries. The July 4 bout shocked white America into the reality that white supremacy was a myth. And a dead one at that.
SPORTS
February 5, 1990 | RICH TOSCHES
Michael Dokes, who in 1982 scored the second-quickest knockout in the history of heavyweight title fights, takes on Jorge Dascola of Argentina tonight in a scheduled 12-round bout at the Forum. At stake will be Dokes' World Boxing Assn. Intercontinental heavyweight championship, a title that is not as massive as Dokes was during his last fight. Weighing 253 1/2 pounds during that Nov. 13 bout, Dokes struggled for seven rounds before knocking out Lionel Washington in the eighth round.
NATIONAL
July 14, 2004 | From Associated Press
Researching a documentary on Jack Johnson, filmmaker Ken Burns decided that racism, not justice, sent the first black heavyweight boxing champion to jail nearly a century ago. Burns decided to seek a presidential pardon to right the wrong. On Tuesday, civil rights leaders and Republican Sens. John McCain of Arizona and Orrin G. Hatch of Utah joined Burns to announce the filing of legal papers with the Justice Department seeking the pardon.
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