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Jim Krusoe

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Illuminations Arthur Rimbaud, translated from the French by John Ashbery W.W. Norton: 165 pp., $24.95 This may be the most beautiful book in the world — lighted from within and somehow embodying all forms of literature at the same time. The 44 prose poems of "Illuminations" were Arthur Rimbaud's goodbye to poetry (though he had said goodbye before); they are poised on the brink of a new world. Rimbaud was on his way to Africa to live a life of commerce, to enter the world of buying and selling.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2011 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Illuminations Arthur Rimbaud, translated from the French by John Ashbery W.W. Norton: 165 pp., $24.95 This may be the most beautiful book in the world — lighted from within and somehow embodying all forms of literature at the same time. The 44 prose poems of "Illuminations" were Arthur Rimbaud's goodbye to poetry (though he had said goodbye before); they are poised on the brink of a new world. Rimbaud was on his way to Africa to live a life of commerce, to enter the world of buying and selling.
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NEWS
November 11, 1997 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most modest man in Los Angeles is enduring a modest man's hell. Jim Krusoe's new book, "Blood Lake" (Boaz), spent its first four weeks in print on the Los Angeles Times bestseller list. Krusoe has to give readings. He has to go to parties in his honor. Writers like Martin Amis and Ian McEwan "ring him up" to tell him what a marvel he is. "So, what are you reading?"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | George Ducker
The death of a loved one nearly always leaves us bewildered, mumbling self-assuring axioms to fill the void. In Jim Krusoe's new novel, "Erased" (Tin House: 216 pp., $14.95 paper), that void takes on entirely unexpected dimensions: Theodore "Ted" Bellefontaine's dead mother, Helen, appears to have gone neither to heaven nor to hell, but to Cleveland. Helen is not the ideal mother -- not by any means. After leaving 4-year-old Ted in the care of a foster parent following her husband's death, she spends the majority of her life pursuing her own ends.
BOOKS
April 19, 1998 | CAROLYN SEE, Carolyn See is the author of "Dreaming: Hard Luck and Good Times in America," "Golden Days" and "Making History."
Who is Jim Krusoe? And why are all his early books out of print? Will he ever find a larger audience? And isn't it about time? When "Blood Lake" came out earlier this year, you couldn't have called it a blockbuster smash, but readers who knew his work marked the event with quiet joy.
BOOKS
July 28, 2002 | JEFF TURRENTINE, Jeff Turrentine is a senior editor at Hemispheres magazine.
Reading "Iceland," Jim Krusoe's slim and surreal first novel, is rather like watching a gifted, self-assured magician perform a routine in which the audience's willing-suspension-of-disbelief threshold is constantly being reset higher and higher. It shouldn't work. It can't work: Too many ironclad laws of fiction writing are being casually violated on every page. Then, miraculously, the author pulls it off, and you're left feeling dazzled, even breathless.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | George Ducker
The death of a loved one nearly always leaves us bewildered, mumbling self-assuring axioms to fill the void. In Jim Krusoe's new novel, "Erased" (Tin House: 216 pp., $14.95 paper), that void takes on entirely unexpected dimensions: Theodore "Ted" Bellefontaine's dead mother, Helen, appears to have gone neither to heaven nor to hell, but to Cleveland. Helen is not the ideal mother -- not by any means. After leaving 4-year-old Ted in the care of a foster parent following her husband's death, she spends the majority of her life pursuing her own ends.
NEWS
November 16, 1989
Thirteen writers, including noted Austrian writer Peter Handke, have contributed short stories and poems to the third edition of the Santa Monica Review, a literary magazine published by Santa Monica College. Jim Krusoe, editor of the review and a professor of English at the college, said the magazine gives new writers the opportunity to appear in a national context. The college prints 1,000 copies of the review, which are available at bookstores around the world, including Shakespeare & Co.
BOOKS
June 1, 2008 | Carolyn Kellogg
Frozen-yogurt shop employee Jonathan is oversmart and underemployed, and very early on in the novel "Girl Factory" by Jim Krusoe (Tin House: 196 pp., $14.95 paper) we realize he's also not quite right. After he learns about a hyper-intelligent, military-bred dog at a local shelter, he determines that he will be the one to rescue the animal: "I went back inside to find a jacket, and it was really more as an afterthought than anything that I took along a crowbar, slipping it up my sleeve so as not to alarm anyone."
BOOKS
December 8, 2002 | Steve Wasserman
It is a pleasure to recommend to readers a clutch of books published in the last year that we found exemplary. Any such list is subjective, even idiosyncratic, of course, since it is impossible to read every worthy book that beckons. We are nonetheless promiscuous readers whose greatest delight is to happen upon a story or subject we had no idea we were interested in but which, in the hands of a gifted and graceful author, proves compelling and unforgettable.
BOOKS
July 28, 2002 | JEFF TURRENTINE, Jeff Turrentine is a senior editor at Hemispheres magazine.
Reading "Iceland," Jim Krusoe's slim and surreal first novel, is rather like watching a gifted, self-assured magician perform a routine in which the audience's willing-suspension-of-disbelief threshold is constantly being reset higher and higher. It shouldn't work. It can't work: Too many ironclad laws of fiction writing are being casually violated on every page. Then, miraculously, the author pulls it off, and you're left feeling dazzled, even breathless.
BOOKS
April 19, 1998 | CAROLYN SEE, Carolyn See is the author of "Dreaming: Hard Luck and Good Times in America," "Golden Days" and "Making History."
Who is Jim Krusoe? And why are all his early books out of print? Will he ever find a larger audience? And isn't it about time? When "Blood Lake" came out earlier this year, you couldn't have called it a blockbuster smash, but readers who knew his work marked the event with quiet joy.
NEWS
November 11, 1997 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most modest man in Los Angeles is enduring a modest man's hell. Jim Krusoe's new book, "Blood Lake" (Boaz), spent its first four weeks in print on the Los Angeles Times bestseller list. Krusoe has to give readings. He has to go to parties in his honor. Writers like Martin Amis and Ian McEwan "ring him up" to tell him what a marvel he is. "So, what are you reading?"
HOME & GARDEN
October 19, 2006 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
ASK writers where they work and you're liable to hear things you weren't expecting. Certainly, the tools of the trade will be involved: a desk, a dictionary, a computer -- sometimes just a pen and paper. But where each writer creates is as idiosyncratic as that writer's voice, as unique as his phrasing, as unusual as her lyricism. Though authors may daydream of the perfectly designed space, for most, the realities are workaday. The writing simply must get done.
BOOKS
July 25, 1993
In his review (Book Review, June 13) of Janet Kauffman's novel, "The Body in Four Parts," Jim Krusoe contrasts Kauffman's style with "the clean, well-lit, clutterless prose of that malest of writers, Hemingway." One might well ask why "clean, well-lit, clutterless" prose is so evidently "masculine" and if one should thus infer that "feminine" prose is "dirty, dark and cluttered"? Of course Krusoe uses the less pejorative terms, "rich, luxurious and heaped-on" to describe Kauffman's language but it seems to me that women authors are restricted more than liberated by labeling this particular style as "feminine."
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