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Jim Ladd

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May 27, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The music, the message and the medium all combined to resonate the tribal drum, which kept time for a syncopated movement of new ideas and innocent dreams. FM radio was the soundtrack of our lives. --Jim Ladd "Radio Waves: Life and Revolution on the FM Dial," a book by veteran Los Angeles deejay Jim Ladd, is a 20-year socio-musical odyssey that begins on a high note of youthful idealism and ends with disillusionment and a loss of innocence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2011
Longtime Los Angeles DJ Jim Ladd will move to satellite radio in mid-January with a new show he'll be hosting nightly on Sirius XM Radio, officials at the service announced Thursday. It gives Ladd's daily show a national audience for the first time in his career. Ladd was fired from his post at KLOS-FM (95.5) in October during a round of cost cutting at the station after a change in ownership. Ladd had been a regular presence on the Southern California airwaves for more than 40 years, and was considered the last DJ at a major market commercial station with complete freedom to choose the music he plays.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1994 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1987, when the entire staff of rebel rocker KMET-FM was summarily dismissed, Joe Benson, a colleague at rival rock station KLOS-FM, extended the fired deejays a sentimental--and unusual--offer: to appear on his show and say goodby to their audience. Tuesday night, KLSX-FM's Jim Ladd, one of those fired KMET deejays, returned the favor: He played host during his KLSX-FM (97.1) show to fired KLOS deejays Benson and Bob Coburn.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2011 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
Jim Ladd can drop rock-star names like nobody's business — no surprise considering music's been his business for four decades. Or it had been until late last month when the new owners of L.A. rock radio station KLOS-FM (95.5) gave the boot to Ladd, who had been holding court behind a microphone there for the last 14 years. And that was just his latest stint at the station. Ladd logged a total of 20 years during three separate tours of rock 'n' roll radio duty at KLOS. A fixture on the Southern California airwaves, Ladd also chalked up nine years at the defunct station KMET-FM before it dumped rock for an easy-listening format dubbed "The Wave," as well as time at L.A.'s short-lived KEDG-FM ("The Edge")
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Rock 'n' Register: KLSX-FM is calling on some famous rockers to help with its efforts to get people to register to vote. David Crosby will join the station's Jim Ladd for a registration drive today from 6 to 8 p.m. at Sherman Oaks Galleria. On Saturday, Jackson Browne will be with Ladd at Santa Monica Place Mall from 1 to 3 p.m. for more voter registration.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1987
In response to Patrick Goldstein's article on KMET (Pop Eye, Jan. 18), please, L.A. does not need another KROQ/KIIS/KPWR formatted station. If Frank Cody's trying to lose the dinosaur image, why is Jim Ladd back on the late-night slot, playing classics? There is no hope for "94.7 New Rock" as it is or as it's trying to be. What is it trying to be? CHARLENE TAGER Long Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1995
It seems that KLSX-FM has finally moved from rock to rock bottom ("KLSX (With Kato) Joins Talk Radio Wars Today," Calendar, Aug. 1). Can it be true that they have dismissed deejays Cynthia Fox, Bob Coburn and Jim Ladd, my all-time favorite deejay, and are replacing them with a talk format starring Kato Kaelin? Sadly, it appears so. My hope is that the former favorites with KLSX will be snapped up en mass by another station and, also, their listeners will switch to that station, and leave Howard Stern and Kaelin talking to themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1995
It seems that KLSX-FM finally has moved from rock to rock bottom ("KLSX (With Kato) Joins Talk Radio Wars Today," Calendar Aug. 1). Can it be true that they have dismissed deejays Cynthia Fox, Bob Coburn and Jim Ladd, my all-time favorite deejay, and are replacing them with a talk format starring Kato Kaelin? Sadly, it appears so. My hope is that the ex-KLSX jocks will be snapped up en mass by another station, and their listeners will switch to that station, and leave Howard Stern and Kaelin talking to themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1987 | Patrick Goldstein
The KTWV-FM (The WAVE) controversy refuses to die. First the station's old deejays blasted its new diet-pop format. Now the musical complaints are legal ones. A trio of ex-KMET deejays--Jim Ladd, David Perry and Jack Snyder--will hold a press conference Friday to discuss a series of "separate but similar" lawsuits filed earlier this month in L.A. Superior Court against KTWV management. Ladd says his suit asks for $2.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2000 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's quarter to midnight on a recent Friday at the La Cienega Boulevard studios of classic rocker KLOS-FM (95.5). While commercials play in the background, disc jockey Jim Ladd does something highly unusual in the world of big-time music radio. He looks through the hundreds of CDs filed on the studio wall and ponders his choices. Selecting a few, he returns to the console. "I was going to do a set about God," he says in an off-air aside to a couple of visitors.
MAGAZINE
February 1, 1998 | Natalie Nichols
It's hard enough to tell what decade this is without radio stations taking giant steps into the past, but KLOS has invoked the ghost of KMET, L.A.'s seminal free-form FM rock station, by bringing back veteran deejay JIM LADD for his third stint in three decades. Hard-core Ladd fans speak in hushed tones of his long residency at KMET, which tuned out for good in 1987.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1995
It seems that KLSX-FM finally has moved from rock to rock bottom ("KLSX (With Kato) Joins Talk Radio Wars Today," Calendar Aug. 1). Can it be true that they have dismissed deejays Cynthia Fox, Bob Coburn and Jim Ladd, my all-time favorite deejay, and are replacing them with a talk format starring Kato Kaelin? Sadly, it appears so. My hope is that the ex-KLSX jocks will be snapped up en mass by another station, and their listeners will switch to that station, and leave Howard Stern and Kaelin talking to themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1995
It seems that KLSX-FM has finally moved from rock to rock bottom ("KLSX (With Kato) Joins Talk Radio Wars Today," Calendar, Aug. 1). Can it be true that they have dismissed deejays Cynthia Fox, Bob Coburn and Jim Ladd, my all-time favorite deejay, and are replacing them with a talk format starring Kato Kaelin? Sadly, it appears so. My hope is that the former favorites with KLSX will be snapped up en mass by another station and, also, their listeners will switch to that station, and leave Howard Stern and Kaelin talking to themselves.
MAGAZINE
May 14, 1995
Need a hot tape for this summer's run to Cabo? KSLX's classic-rock doyen humbly offers his short list of killer road tunes, presented in suggested order of play for maximum metaphorical resonance. Crank it up. 1. "Brand New Car" Rolling Stones 2. "Pink Cadillac" Bruce Springsteen 3. "Mercury Blues" David Lindley 4. "Hot Rod Lincoln" Commander Cody 5. "Fun, Fun, Fun" The Beach Boys 6. "You Can't Catch Me" George Thorogood 7. "Get Out of Denver" Bob Seger 8.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1994 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1987, when the entire staff of rebel rocker KMET-FM was summarily dismissed, Joe Benson, a colleague at rival rock station KLOS-FM, extended the fired deejays a sentimental--and unusual--offer: to appear on his show and say goodby to their audience. Tuesday night, KLSX-FM's Jim Ladd, one of those fired KMET deejays, returned the favor: He played host during his KLSX-FM (97.1) show to fired KLOS deejays Benson and Bob Coburn.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1987
We send our heartfelt thanks to all the KMET listeners who've given us loving support over the years. Thanks for being there. Thanks also to the L.A. Times for the superb coverage of KMET's demise. It was gratifying to see the KMET spirit recognized by Robert Hilburn. We are grateful to the broadcasting community for their support--especially radio stations KLOS and KLSX for letting us invade their studios, and television stations KCBS, KABC, KNBC, KTTV and KHJ-TV for their coverage.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1987 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, Times Staff Writer
"It's business as normal," KMET-FM (94.7) music programmer Greg Davis told The Times by telephone Friday. But it was anything but normal in the ears of listeners. KMET apparently disposed of its entire on-air staff on Friday, just as classical music stations KFAC-AM and FM virtually cleared out its entire on-air staff a month ago. KMET, the perennial rock outlet, converted to an all-music/no personalities format without any warning to its audience or its staff.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Rock 'n' Register: KLSX-FM is calling on some famous rockers to help with its efforts to get people to register to vote. David Crosby will join the station's Jim Ladd for a registration drive today from 6 to 8 p.m. at Sherman Oaks Galleria. On Saturday, Jackson Browne will be with Ladd at Santa Monica Place Mall from 1 to 3 p.m. for more voter registration.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The music, the message and the medium all combined to resonate the tribal drum, which kept time for a syncopated movement of new ideas and innocent dreams. FM radio was the soundtrack of our lives. --Jim Ladd "Radio Waves: Life and Revolution on the FM Dial," a book by veteran Los Angeles deejay Jim Ladd, is a 20-year socio-musical odyssey that begins on a high note of youthful idealism and ends with disillusionment and a loss of innocence.
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