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Jim Leach

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NEWS
November 12, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two Republicans expected to head the House and Senate Banking committees in the new Congress plan intensive investigations into the role of President Clinton in the failed Whitewater real estate venture--inquiries that could become a major headache for the White House. Aides to Rep.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2009 | Mike Boehm
President Obama is now two-for-two in making somewhat unorthodox choices for the top spots in the agencies that help set and fund the nation's cultural agenda. After recently tapping Rocco Landesman, a Broadway producer and theater owner, to head the National Endowment for the Arts, Obama on Wednesday picked a longtime former Republican congressman, Jim Leach of Iowa, to head the National Endowment for the Humanities. "I don't look at it as a partisan circumstance at all," Leach said when reached at Princeton University, where since 2007 he has been a professor of public and international affairs.
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NEWS
March 10, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
After years of plaguing the leaders of his own party, maverick Republican Rep. Jim Leach is emerging as one of President Clinton's most formidable adversaries in the Whitewater controversy. The 51-year-old Iowa lawmaker demonstrated his resolve this week by pushing ahead with plans to turn a planned House Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee hearing into an inquiry into the Whitewater tangle. He is doing so despite special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr.'
NEWS
January 7, 1997 | JANET HOOK and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bucking pressure from Republican leaders to support House Speaker Newt Gingrich despite his ethics problems, a small group of GOP dissidents plans to challenge his reelection to the top leadership post when it comes to a vote today. But after an emotional, 3 1/2-hour meeting Monday night at which Gingrich explained his side of the ethics case to his GOP colleagues, House Republican leaders said that they remained confident there would not be enough defectors to deny him the speakership.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2009 | Mike Boehm
President Obama is now two-for-two in making somewhat unorthodox choices for the top spots in the agencies that help set and fund the nation's cultural agenda. After recently tapping Rocco Landesman, a Broadway producer and theater owner, to head the National Endowment for the Arts, Obama on Wednesday picked a longtime former Republican congressman, Jim Leach of Iowa, to head the National Endowment for the Humanities. "I don't look at it as a partisan circumstance at all," Leach said when reached at Princeton University, where since 2007 he has been a professor of public and international affairs.
NEWS
January 7, 1997 | JANET HOOK and MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bucking pressure from Republican leaders to support House Speaker Newt Gingrich despite his ethics problems, a small group of GOP dissidents plans to challenge his reelection to the top leadership post when it comes to a vote today. But after an emotional, 3 1/2-hour meeting Monday night at which Gingrich explained his side of the ethics case to his GOP colleagues, House Republican leaders said that they remained confident there would not be enough defectors to deny him the speakership.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2009
Re: David Lazarus' consumer column "Chase cardholders call hike a raw deal," July 1: I have an excellent payment history of paying more than the minimum and on time each month. All card issuers agreed to lower my rate except Chase. Now I'm using my good credit to take out a loan to pay them their balance and never do business with them again. Jim Leach Trabuco Canyon
NEWS
May 26, 1996 | Associated Press
President Clinton and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton made three mistakes on their tax returns concerning Whitewater and recently paid $3,400 in taxes and penalties, the White House said Friday. Tax experts commissioned by the Clintons found two incorrect interest deductions and a failure in one instance to declare a capital gain. The experts said the fragmentary record made it impossible to determine whether the Clintons made additional errors.
NEWS
December 8, 1994
THE KEY PLAYERS Matthew Raabe: A 10-year county worker was appointed interim treasurer after previously defending the investment practices of then-Treasurer-Tax Collector Robert L. Citron. John M.W. Moorlach: The former candidate for county treasurer-tax collector made incumbent Robert L. Citron's risky investment policies the centerpiece of his failed campaign in June. Rep. Jim Leach: The Republican from Iowa has called for congressional hearings on the Orange County funding debacle. Rep.
NEWS
November 12, 1994 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two Republicans expected to head the House and Senate Banking committees in the new Congress plan intensive investigations into the role of President Clinton in the failed Whitewater real estate venture--inquiries that could become a major headache for the White House. Aides to Rep.
NEWS
March 10, 1994 | ROBERT SHOGAN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
After years of plaguing the leaders of his own party, maverick Republican Rep. Jim Leach is emerging as one of President Clinton's most formidable adversaries in the Whitewater controversy. The 51-year-old Iowa lawmaker demonstrated his resolve this week by pushing ahead with plans to turn a planned House Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee hearing into an inquiry into the Whitewater tangle. He is doing so despite special counsel Robert B. Fiske Jr.'
NEWS
November 9, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An internal CIA investigation found no evidence the agency knew anything about alleged drug smuggling activities at an airport in Mena, Ark., where the CIA once held a secret training exercise. "No evidence has been found that the CIA was associated with money laundering, narcotics trafficking, arms smuggling or other illegal activities at or around Mena, Ark., at any time," said the report. The investigation was conducted by Frederick P. Hitz, the CIA inspector general.
BUSINESS
February 29, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
House Panel Warned About Money Laundering: Organized crime in the banking system, including money laundering and other financial scams, is raising national security and foreign policy concerns, witnesses told the House Banking Committee. Money laundering--used by drug dealers and other criminals to deposit illegal profits--now moves as much as $500 billion through the system annually.
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