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Jim Lehrer

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2012
Jim Lehrer says he accomplished precisely what he wanted while moderating the first presidential debate: He got Mitt Romney and Barack Obama to talk to one another. The former PBS anchor took heavy flak on social media for his light hand during Wednesday's debate. He asked general, open-ended questions and let the candidates go at it. Lehrer said in an interview that it was a conscious effort to encourage a different kind of debate, one he said Monday will be looked back upon as a watershed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff are making history on PBS. They have just been named the co-anchors of the "PBS Newshour. " This marks the first time in history that a major network newscast has been anchored by two women. Ifill and Woodruff will serve as both anchors and managing editors of the PBS broadcast Monday through Thursday each week. Woodruff will anchor solo on Friday while Ifill handles her duties on her other PBS series, "Washington Week. " Hari Sreenivasan, who was previously announced as anchor of the "PBS Newshour Weekend," will also serve as a senior correspondent for the weeknight version of the broadcast.
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NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Doyle McManus
Will Wednesday night's debate have much to offer the dwindling band of undecided voters who could well determine the outcome of the presidential election? Aside from predictable moments of combat, can they expect anything to help make up their minds? That will be up to the third person on stage, PBS' unflappable Jim Lehrer. He'll be trying to get the candidates to focus on issues, but that doesn't mean it will be easy. Here are three questions I hope Lehrer will ask -- and, if he doesn't get an answer the first time, ask again: First, for President Obama: Was the partisan gridlock that made it impossible to fix the federal budget entirely the opposition's fault, or was there anything you could have done to produce a better outcome?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Cable news currently seems to be in a state of disarray, and the traditional network news divisions are struggling to get airtime. Sensing a chance to expand its claim in the highly competitive broadcast-news arena, public television plans to extend its revered "NewsHour" program to weekends. The new program, titled "PBS NewsHour Weekend," will be, strangely, just a half-hour long. Beginning Sept. 7, it is to air every Saturday and Sunday from the studios of WNET in Lincoln Center in New York City.
NEWS
October 9, 2012 | By James Rainey
After an initial burst of criticism, Jim Lehrer said “everybody is pretty well chilled-out” now about his performance as moderator of the first presidential debate this fall, and he believes it will start a new era with less involvement by moderators and more direct interaction by candidates. Lehrer made his remarks Monday night to Sean Hannity on "Fox News. " Hannity pronounced the PBS news veteran's performance “great” and extremely fair. The furor over last Wednesday's debate between President Obama and GOP nominee Mitt Romney has created strange bedfellows.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2011 | By Melissa Maerz, Los Angeles Times
After 36 years as the anchor of "NewsHour" on PBS, Jim Lehrer announced Thursday that he will step down from his post, bringing an end to the longest run of a national anchorman. His last day in that role will be June 6, but he will continue to appear on many Friday evenings to moderate the program's weekly news analysis segment, which also features journalists Mark Shields and David Brooks. In an interview, Lehrer, 76, said he'd been planning his exit since 2009, when he took his name off the program (then called "The NewsHour With Jim Lehrer")
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | SCOTT WILLIAMS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It's not enough that Jim Lehrer, a newsman's newsman and half of PBS' acclaimed "MacNeil-Lehrer NewsHour" anchor team, helps to create an hourlong newscast for about 2 million viewers every night. No, Lehrer has to go out and write books, too. And not your typical Commentator Views With Alarm books, either. He likes to write books that are funny. His latest, "Lost and Found," is his fourth on the One-Eyed Mack, an unnamed, fictional lieutenant governor in the mythical state of Oklahoma.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1994 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert MacNeil confirmed Monday that he will retire as co-anchor of PBS' "MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour" next year and said his decision was influenced by funding difficulties in public television. MacNeil, 63, told "NewsHour" staffers that he intends to leave in October, 1995, the newscast's 20th anniversary. Jim Lehrer, 60, who co-anchors the hourlong weekday broadcasts from Washington, will then become solo anchor, with all operations being consolidated in the nation's capital.
BOOKS
May 22, 1988 | Mark Harris, Harris is the author of numerous books, including "Bang the Drum Slowly" and "Saul Bellow, Drumlin Woodchuck."
Bad practice, I know, to judge a book by the face of the author, but I can't help myself. Every evening for several evenings I have been running into the TV room to gaze upon the face of Jim Lehrer, my object being to try to understand him, try to match the man with this novel he has written called "Kick the Can." In this novel, a boy named Mack, 16 years old, loses an eye in an accident during a game of Kick the Can.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1998 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jim Lehrer, who was a newspaper columnist and novelist long before TV claimed him as a network anchor, was driving through Texas in 1984 and stopped at a Dairy Queen restaurant, the kind of place that is the biggest thing going between two very small towns. "There was a guy in the restaurant who kept telling the waitress that he'd given her a $20 bill when she'd only given him change for a $10," Lehrer recalls. "He got very angry about it, and I got the hell out of there.
NEWS
October 18, 2012 | By James Rainey
Conventional wisdom might suggest that the moderator of presidential debate No. 3 -- Bob Schieffer of CBS News - will reprise the nearly invisible style adopted by Jim Lehrer in the first debate between President Obama and Mitt Romney. Both Schieffer and Lehrer are old-school newsmen who ascended the ranks in the days before social media and the most aggressive branding of network stars. But don't expect Schieffer, 75, to deliver a performance nearly as passive as Lehrer's.
NEWS
October 9, 2012 | By James Rainey
After an initial burst of criticism, Jim Lehrer said “everybody is pretty well chilled-out” now about his performance as moderator of the first presidential debate this fall, and he believes it will start a new era with less involvement by moderators and more direct interaction by candidates. Lehrer made his remarks Monday night to Sean Hannity on "Fox News. " Hannity pronounced the PBS news veteran's performance “great” and extremely fair. The furor over last Wednesday's debate between President Obama and GOP nominee Mitt Romney has created strange bedfellows.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2012
Jim Lehrer says he accomplished precisely what he wanted while moderating the first presidential debate: He got Mitt Romney and Barack Obama to talk to one another. The former PBS anchor took heavy flak on social media for his light hand during Wednesday's debate. He asked general, open-ended questions and let the candidates go at it. Lehrer said in an interview that it was a conscious effort to encourage a different kind of debate, one he said Monday will be looked back upon as a watershed.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Dan Turner
I'm not really sure who won Wednesday night's presidential debate, but I'm quite certain who lost: Jim Lehrer. The venerable PBS anchor has hosted 12 presidential debates, so you'd think that by now he'd know what he was doing. Yet Lehrer lost all semblance of control over the 90-minute contest. After beginning the debate by laying out its organization into six 15-minute pods on specific topics, within minutes that scheme was in shambles as the candidates -- particularly a remarkably aggressive Mitt Romney -- ran over their allotted speaking time and completely ignored Lehrer's feeble attempts to impose order.
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By James Rainey
Debate moderator Jim Lehrer may have achieved by default in Wednesday night's presidential debate what political aficionados have said they have long wanted - an unfettered debate in which two candidates stood on stage alone. Lehrer's retiring performance came in for a wave of criticism following the first of three confrontations between President Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney. The PBS NewsHour host didn't enforce time limits, gave Obama four more minutes to speak than he gave Romney and didn't clarify some of the arcane terms tossed about by the two combatants.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg
Rules? What debate rules? Both candidates at Wednesday night's presidential debate came out of the gate ignoring directions from moderator Jim Lehrer. Asked to “respond directly to what the governor just said about trickle-down” government spending, President Obama instead said he would “talk specifically about what I think we need to do” -- and spoke at some length about his education and energy policies. Trickle down? Never mind. When Obama finished, Lehrer turned to former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney.
NEWS
October 18, 1992 | Associated Press
Jim Lehrer of PBS will be the moderator for Monday night's final debate of the presidential campaign, the Commission on Presidential Debates said Saturday. He will be joined for half the debate by Helen Thomas of UPI, Gene Gibbons of Reuters and Susan Rook of CNN.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2008 | Matea Gold
PBS anchor Jim Lehrer will be back anchoring "The NewsHour" today for the first time since he underwent a heart valve procedure in late April. Lehrer will initially anchor the evening newscast two to three days a week, but plans to resume his full-time duties, a spokeswoman said. He is set to be the lead anchor of PBS' prime-time coverage of the Democratic and Republican national conventions this summer.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | By Doyle McManus
Will Wednesday night's debate have much to offer the dwindling band of undecided voters who could well determine the outcome of the presidential election? Aside from predictable moments of combat, can they expect anything to help make up their minds? That will be up to the third person on stage, PBS' unflappable Jim Lehrer. He'll be trying to get the candidates to focus on issues, but that doesn't mean it will be easy. Here are three questions I hope Lehrer will ask -- and, if he doesn't get an answer the first time, ask again: First, for President Obama: Was the partisan gridlock that made it impossible to fix the federal budget entirely the opposition's fault, or was there anything you could have done to produce a better outcome?
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